1. Global Cross-Reference

rdf:type Instance
owl:ObjectProperty:
owl:Class:

owl:Class Instance
genre:Genre:
genre:LiteraryGenre:

2. Terms and Details

owl:Class (2)

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genre

Genres are used to classify cultural works within an evolving spectrum of categories often on the basis of form, content, or style. There is debate over whether genre inheres in works themselves or emerges from contexts of reception, but the shifts in historical definitions indicate that genres have a strong social component (Miller 1984).

URI: http://sparql.cwrc.ca/ontologies/genre#Genre
Tag: genre:Genre
owl:sameAs: dbpedia:Genre
rdf:type: owl:Class skos:ConceptScheme
Within Domain: genre:genreOf
Children Classes: genre:LiteraryGenre
Within Range: genre:hasGenre
Instances:

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literary genre

Literary genres are used to classify texts within an ever-evolving spectrum of literary forms and practices. There is debate over whether genre inheres in texts themselves or emerges from contexts of reception, but the shifts in historical definitions indicate that genres, literary and more broadly, have a strong social component (Dubrow, 1982; Miller 1984). Genres are most frequently related to formal features such as the English sonnet's fourteen lines of iambic pentameter, to characteristic subject matter such as themes of romance, horror, comedy, or tragedy, to aspects of style such as hard-boiled detective fiction, or to the purpose of a text. Within the context of literary studies, the question of "purpose," especially when considered within a political context, is of keen interest to literary scholars. For example, feminist literary scholars like Cynthia Huff ("‘That Profoundly Female, and Feminist Genre’: The Diary as Feminist Practice"), Giancarlo Lombardi (Rooms with a View: Feminist Diary Fiction, 1952-1999), Rita Felski (Beyond Feminist Aesthetics: Feminist Literature and Social Change) and others read "diary fiction" as a powerful genre used to spur on women’s movements. For more on literary genre, see the introduction to this ontology.

URI: http://sparql.cwrc.ca/ontologies/genre#LiteraryGenre
Tag: genre:LiteraryGenre
rdf:type: owl:Class skos:ConceptScheme
rdfs:subClassOf: genre:Genre
skos:closeMatch: dbpedia:Literary_genre http://vocab.getty.edu/aat/300055907
Instances:

owl:ObjectProperty (2)

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genre of
URI: http://sparql.cwrc.ca/ontologies/genre#genreOf
Tag: genre:genreOf
owl:inverseOf: genre:hasGenre
rdf:type: owl:ObjectProperty
rdfs:domain: genre:Genre

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has genre

The cultural work in question is classified by this genre. A single work may be classified as belonging to multiple genres, which may overlap or even seem to be contradictory, such as verse novels also classified as poetry and fiction. See literary genre and the CWRC Literary Genres Ontology for information on literary classification.

URI: http://sparql.cwrc.ca/ontologies/genre#hasGenre
Tag: genre:hasGenre
rdf:type: owl:ObjectProperty
rdfs:range: genre:Genre
*owl:inverseOf: genre:genreOf

owl:Class Instances

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chronology

"Tables, lists, or treatises listing events, biographies, milestones, or other items in serial temporal order relative to given dates or time periods." (Getty, 2017)

Comment: The description for this term is indebted to the Getty Art & Architecture Thesaurus.

[skos:altLabel: timeline ]

URI: http://sparql.cwrc.ca/ontologies/genre#chronology
Tag: genre:chronology
prov:wasDerivedFrom: http://vocab.getty.edu/page/aat/300252008
rdf:type: genre:Genre skos:Concept
skos:inScheme: genre:Genre

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music

"Performing arts genre having to do with the combining of vocal or instrumental sounds in measured time to communicate emotions, ideas, or states of mind, usually according to cultural standards of rhythm, melody, and, in most Western music, harmony." (Getty, 2017)

Comment: This term and its description were created from data gathered from the Getty Art & Architecture Thesaurus.

URI: http://sparql.cwrc.ca/ontologies/genre#music
Tag: genre:music
prov:wasDerivedFrom: http://vocab.getty.edu/page/aat/300054146
rdf:type: genre:Genre skos:Concept
skos:inScheme: genre:Genre
skos:narrowerTransitive: genre:ballade

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performance

A capacious and contested category of time-based and usually embodied human expression through actions or processes that may occur in institutionalized locations, more informal cultural contexts, and broader social situations, as in the performance of social identities. Most often applied to literary, artistic, musical, theatrical, or other creative work, or the representation or record of such work. Within the Records of Early English Drama project, "Performance has been broadly defined to encompass nearly every mimetic, musical, or ritualistic form of play used to entertain or otherwise engage an audience." (REED Online, 2018)

Comment: This term and its description were created from data gathered from the Getty Art & Architecture Thesaurus.

URI: http://sparql.cwrc.ca/ontologies/genre#performance
Tag: genre:performance
prov:wasDerivedFrom: http://vocab.getty.edu/page/aat/300054146
rdf:type: genre:Genre skos:Concept
skos:inScheme: genre:Genre

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record

"Evidence about an object or the past, regardless of medium, as preserved in a record or document. As defined by the Library of Congress, records are "Documents in any form created or received by an agency, institution, organization, or individual, accumulated in the normal conduct of business or affairs." (Library of Congress, 2018) Wikipedia says, "A document is a written, drawn, presented or recorded representation of thoughts. Originating from the Latin Documentum meaning lesson - the verb doceō means to teach, and is pronounced similarly, in the past it was usually used as a term for a written proof used as evidence. In the computer age, a document is usually used to describe a primarily textual file, along with its structure and design, such as fonts, colors and additional images." (Wikipedia, 2018) Information scientist Suzanne Breit defines a document as "any concrete or symbolic indication, preserved or recorded, for reconstructing or for proving a phenomenon, whether physical or mental." (Breit, 1951; translated)

Comment: This term and its description were created from data gathered from the Library of Congress.
This term and its description were created from data gathered from DBpedia.

[skos:altLabel: document ]

URI: http://sparql.cwrc.ca/ontologies/genre#record
Tag: genre:record
owl:sameAs: http://id.loc.gov/authorities/genreForms/gf2014026163
prov:wasDerivedFrom: dbpedia:Document
rdf:type: genre:Genre skos:Concept
skos:inScheme: genre:Genre

genre:LiteraryGenre (245)

literary genre

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abridgement

"Versions of written works produced by condensation and omission but with retention of the general meaning and manner of presentation of the original, often prepared by someone other than the author of the original." (Getty, 2017)

Comment: The description for this term is indebted to the Getty Art & Architecture Thesaurus.

URI: http://sparql.cwrc.ca/ontologies/genre#abridgement
Tag: genre:abridgement
prov:wasDerivedFrom: http://vocab.getty.edu/aat/300202489
rdf:type: genre:LiteraryGenre skos:Concept
skos:inScheme: genre:LiteraryGenre

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à clef

"A novel in which the characters and plots are fictionalized, but can actually be recognized as real people and events in disguise. French for "novel with a key."" (DBpedia, 2017)

Comment: This term and its description were created from data gathered from DBpedia.

URI: http://sparql.cwrc.ca/ontologies/genre#aclef
Tag: genre:aclef
prov:wasDerivedFrom: dbpedia:Roman_%C3%A0_clef
rdf:type: genre:LiteraryGenre skos:Concept
skos:broaderTransitive: genre:novel
skos:inScheme: genre:LiteraryGenre

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acrostic

"Short poems or prose compositions in which text is arranged so that the first letters of each line form a word, phrase, or motto." (Getty, 2017)

Comment: The description for this term is indebted to the Getty Art & Architecture Thesaurus.
The description for this term is indebted to DBpedia.

URI: http://sparql.cwrc.ca/ontologies/genre#acrostic
Tag: genre:acrostic
prov:wasDerivedFrom: dbpedia:Acrostic http://vocab.getty.edu/aat/300256198
rdf:type: genre:LiteraryGenre skos:Concept
skos:broaderTransitive: genre:poetry
skos:inScheme: genre:LiteraryGenre

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adaptation

W"ritten works or works derived from written works, where the second work is an alteration or amendment a text to make it suitable for another purpose. An example of an adaptation is a version of an earlier text made to better agree with a philosophy other than that intended by the original. Other examples are written works adapted for another medium, such as film, broadcasting, or stage production."(Getty, 2017)

Comment: The description for this term is indebted to the Getty Art & Architecture Thesaurus.

URI: http://sparql.cwrc.ca/ontologies/genre#adaptation
Tag: genre:adaptation
prov:wasDerivedFrom: http://vocab.getty.edu/aat/300410356
rdf:type: genre:LiteraryGenre skos:Concept
skos:inScheme: genre:LiteraryGenre

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adventure writing

"Action-filled fiction in which a protagonist is removed from her or his ordinary life to undertake some sort of journey or quest. Along the way, the protagonist is exposed to extraordinary events and physical dangers that put his or her virtues, such as bravery, to the test." (Oxford, 2015)

Comment: This term and its description were created from data gathered from the Oxford Dictionary of Literary Terms, 4th ed.

[skos:altLabel: adventure story ]

URI: http://sparql.cwrc.ca/ontologies/genre#adventureWriting
Tag: genre:adventureWriting
prov:wasDerivedFrom: http://www.oxfordreference.com/view/10.1093/acref/9780199208272.001.0001/acref-9780199208272-e-15?rskey=BDrsna%26result=11
rdf:type: genre:LiteraryGenre skos:Concept
skos:broaderTransitive: genre:fiction
skos:inScheme: genre:LiteraryGenre

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advertising copy

"The text of an advertisement for any type of medium. Typically short, and full of attention-grabbing, persuasive language that aims to quickly convince a consumer to make a purchase." (WebFinance Inc., 2017)

Comment: This term and its description were created from data gathered from the WebFinance Inc. Online Business Dictionary.
This term and its description were created from data gathered from DBpedia.

URI: http://sparql.cwrc.ca/ontologies/genre#advertisingCopy
Tag: genre:advertisingCopy
prov:wasDerivedFrom: dbpedia:Advertising_slogan http://www.businessdictionary.com/definition/advertising-copy.html
rdf:type: genre:LiteraryGenre skos:Concept
skos:inScheme: genre:LiteraryGenre

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afterpiece

"A short drama performed after a main play, popularized in the 1700s as justification for a new half-price entrance fee charged to latecomers. Typically a comedic one-act, regardless of the genre of the preceding play." (Penguin, 1999)

Comment: This term and its description were created from data gathered from the Penguin Dictionary of Literary Terms & Literary Theory, 4th ed.

URI: http://sparql.cwrc.ca/ontologies/genre#afterpiece
Tag: genre:afterpiece
prov:wasDerivedFrom: https://www.politicalavenue.com/10862/ENGLISH-LANGUAGE-BOOKS/English%20-%20Penguin%20Dictionary%20Of%20Literary%20Terms%20And%20Literary%20Theory.pdf
rdf:type: genre:LiteraryGenre skos:Concept
skos:broaderTransitive: genre:drama
skos:inScheme: genre:LiteraryGenre

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afterword

"A section that appears towards the end of a book, does not form part of the main body, and often concludes or summarizes." (Oxford, 2015)

Comment: This term and its description were created from data gathered from DBpedia.
This term and its description were created from data gathered from the Oxford Dictionary of English, 3rd ed.

URI: http://sparql.cwrc.ca/ontologies/genre#afterword
Tag: genre:afterword
prov:wasDerivedFrom: dbpedia:Postface http://www.oxfordreference.com/view/10.1093/acref/9780199571123.001.0001/m_en_gb0012830?rskey=tDwp66%26result=1411
rdf:type: genre:LiteraryGenre skos:Concept
skos:broaderTransitive: genre:paratext
skos:inScheme: genre:LiteraryGenre

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agitprop

"Derived from agitation propaganda, meaning intended to inspire political action. With reference to visual art, refers to the specific art movement arising in Soviet Russia following the Bolshevik revolution." (Getty, 2017)

Comment: The description for this term is indebted to the Getty Art & Architecture Thesaurus.

URI: http://sparql.cwrc.ca/ontologies/genre#agitprop
Tag: genre:agitprop
prov:wasDerivedFrom: http://vocab.getty.edu/aat/300055540
rdf:type: genre:LiteraryGenre skos:Concept
skos:broaderTransitive: genre:drama genre:politicalWriting
skos:inScheme: genre:LiteraryGenre

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allegory

"Literary works, art works, or other creative works that employ allegory to express complex abstract ideas, for example works that employ symbolic, fictional figures and actions to express truths or generalizations about human conduct or experience." (Getty, 2017)

Comment: The description for this term is indebted to the Getty Art & Architecture Thesaurus.
The description for this term is indebted to DBpedia.

URI: http://sparql.cwrc.ca/ontologies/genre#allegory
Tag: genre:allegory
prov:wasDerivedFrom: dbpedia:Allegory http://vocab.getty.edu/aat/300202507
rdf:type: genre:LiteraryGenre skos:Concept
skos:inScheme: genre:LiteraryGenre

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anagram

1- "Words or phrases made by transposing the letters of other words or phrases." (Getty, 2017)

2- "Anagrammatic poetry is poetry with the constrained form that either each line or each verse is an anagram of all other lines or verses in the poem. A poet that specializes in anagrams is an anagrammarian. Writing anagrammatic poetry is a form of a constrained writing similar to writing pangrams or long alliterations." (DBpedia, 2017)

Comment: This term and its description were created from data gathered from DBpedia.
The description for this term is indebted to DBpedia.
The description for this term is indebted to the Getty Art & Architecture Thesaurus.

URI: http://sparql.cwrc.ca/ontologies/genre#anagram
Tag: genre:anagram
prov:wasDerivedFrom: dbpedia:Anagram dbpedia:Anagrammatic_poem http://vocab.getty.edu/aat/300202515
rdf:type: genre:LiteraryGenre skos:Concept
skos:broaderTransitive: genre:poetry
skos:inScheme: genre:LiteraryGenre

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annotation

"Notes added as comment or explanation, such as those accompanying an entry in a bibliography, reading list, or catalogue intended to describe, explain, or evaluate the publication referred to." (Getty, 2017)

Comment: The description for this term is indebted to the Getty Art & Architecture Thesaurus.

URI: http://sparql.cwrc.ca/ontologies/genre#annotation
Tag: genre:annotation
prov:wasDerivedFrom: http://vocab.getty.edu/aat/300026100
rdf:type: genre:LiteraryGenre skos:Concept
skos:broaderTransitive: genre:paratext
skos:inScheme: genre:LiteraryGenre

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answer

A form of intertextuality in which an author writes a response to a work by another writer, typically to argue against the statements of that work. Often takes the form of an essay or letter.

URI: http://sparql.cwrc.ca/ontologies/genre#answer
Tag: genre:answer
rdf:type: genre:LiteraryGenre skos:Concept
skos:inScheme: genre:LiteraryGenre

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anthem

"A song in which the lyrics promote pride in and allegiance to the identity and values of a particular group, such as a nation, sports team, or social cause." (Oxford, 2015)

Comment: This term and its description were created from data gathered from the Oxford Dictionary of Literary Terms, 4th ed.

URI: http://sparql.cwrc.ca/ontologies/genre#anthem
Tag: genre:anthem
prov:wasDerivedFrom: http://www.oxfordreference.com/view/10.1093/acref/9780199208272.001.0001/acref-9780199208272-e-61?rskey=9jlyTO%26result=61
rdf:type: genre:LiteraryGenre skos:Concept
skos:broaderTransitive: genre:musicalWriting genre:song
skos:inScheme: genre:LiteraryGenre

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anthology

"Collections of choice extracts, from the writings of one author, or various authors, and usually having a common characteristic such as subject matter or literary form." (Getty, 2017)

Comment: The description for this term is indebted to the Getty Art & Architecture Thesaurus.

URI: http://sparql.cwrc.ca/ontologies/genre#anthology
Tag: genre:anthology
prov:wasDerivedFrom: http://vocab.getty.edu/aat/300026037
rdf:type: genre:LiteraryGenre skos:Concept
skos:inScheme: genre:LiteraryGenre

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anti-romance

A text that rejects in some way the form of the romance novel. Often linked to satirical and picaresque novels.

URI: http://sparql.cwrc.ca/ontologies/genre#antiRomance
Tag: genre:antiRomance
cwrc:contraryTo: genre:romance
rdf:type: genre:LiteraryGenre skos:Concept
skos:inScheme: genre:LiteraryGenre

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aphorism

"Short, pithy statements of principle or precepts, often of known authorship; distinguished from "proverbs" which are statements repeated colloquially and which often embody the folk wisdom of a group or nation." (Getty, 2017)

Comment: The description for this term is indebted to the Getty Art & Architecture Thesaurus.

URI: http://sparql.cwrc.ca/ontologies/genre#aphorism
Tag: genre:aphorism
prov:wasDerivedFrom: http://vocab.getty.edu/aat/300253001
rdf:type: genre:LiteraryGenre skos:Concept
skos:inScheme: genre:LiteraryGenre

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apology

"A text in which a writer defends the possibly controversial opinions contained in his or her writing." (Oxford, 2015)

Comment: This term and its description were created from data gathered from DBpedia.
This term and its description were created from data gathered from the Oxford Dictionary of Literary Terms, 4th ed.

URI: http://sparql.cwrc.ca/ontologies/genre#apology
Tag: genre:apology
prov:wasDerivedFrom: dbpedia:Apologia http://www.oxfordreference.com/view/10.1093/acref/9780199208272.001.0001/acref-9780199208272-e-81?rskey=cEhQEO%26result=81
rdf:type: genre:LiteraryGenre skos:Concept
skos:broaderTransitive: genre:poetry
skos:inScheme: genre:LiteraryGenre

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art criticism

"The study or practice of the analytical description, interpretation, and evaluation of visual art works and exhibitions." (Getty, 2017)

Comment: This term and its description were created from data gathered from the Getty Art & Architecture Thesaurus.

URI: http://sparql.cwrc.ca/ontologies/genre#artCriticism
Tag: genre:artCriticism
prov:wasDerivedFrom: http://vocab.getty.edu/aat/300168233
rdf:type: genre:LiteraryGenre skos:Concept
skos:broaderTransitive: genre:scholarship
skos:inScheme: genre:LiteraryGenre

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autobiography

"Documents of any type that are biographies of individuals written by themselves. For the overall genre, use "autobiography (genre).""(Getty, 2017)

Comment: The description for this term is indebted to the Getty Art & Architecture Thesaurus.

URI: http://sparql.cwrc.ca/ontologies/genre#autobiography
Tag: genre:autobiography
prov:wasDerivedFrom: http://vocab.getty.edu/aat/300080104
rdf:type: genre:LiteraryGenre skos:Concept
skos:inScheme: genre:LiteraryGenre
skos:narrowerTransitive: genre:captivityNarrative genre:diary genre:sexualAwakeningFiction genre:slaveNarrative

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ballad

A ballad /ˈbæləd/ is a form of verse, often a narrative set to music. Ballads derive from the medieval French chanson balladée or ballade, which were originally "dancing songs". Ballads were particularly characteristic of the popular poetry and song of the British Isles from the later medieval period until the 19th century and used extensively across Europe and later the Americas, Australia and North Africa.(DBpedia, 2017)

Comment: The description for this term is indebted to DBpedia.

URI: http://sparql.cwrc.ca/ontologies/genre#ballad
Tag: genre:ballad
owl:comment: This term and its description were created from data gathered from DBpedia.
prov:wasDerivedFrom: dbpedia:Ballad
rdf:type: genre:LiteraryGenre skos:Concept
skos:broaderTransitive: genre:poetry
skos:inScheme: genre:LiteraryGenre

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ballad opera

"A drama combining song and spoken dialogue, popularized in the 1700s by John Gay’s The Beggar’s Opera. It can be seen as a precursor to the modern musical." (Penguin, 1999)

Comment: This term and its description were created from data gathered from DBpedia.
This term and its description were created from data gathered from the Penguin Dictionary of Literary Terms & Literary Theory, 4th ed.

URI: http://sparql.cwrc.ca/ontologies/genre#balladOpera
Tag: genre:balladOpera
prov:wasDerivedFrom: dbpedia:Ballad_opera https://www.politicalavenue.com/10862/ENGLISH-LANGUAGE-BOOKS/English%20-%20Penguin%20Dictionary%20Of%20Literary%20Terms%20And%20Literary%20Theory.pdf
rdf:type: genre:LiteraryGenre skos:Concept
skos:broaderTransitive: genre:drama genre:opera
skos:inScheme: genre:LiteraryGenre

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ballade

"A ballade (from French ballade, [baˈlad], and German Ballade, [baˈlaːdə], both being words for "ballad"), in classical music since the late 18th century, refers to a setting of a literary ballad, a narrative poem, in the musical tradition of the Lied, or to a one-movement instrumental piece with lyrical and dramatic narrative qualities reminiscent of such a song setting, especially a piano ballad." (DBpedia, 2017)

Comment: This term and its description were created from data gathered from DBpedia.
The description for this term is indebted to DBpedia.

URI: http://sparql.cwrc.ca/ontologies/genre#ballade
Tag: genre:ballade
prov:wasDerivedFrom: dbpedia:Ballad dbpedia:Ballade_(classical_music)
rdf:type: genre:LiteraryGenre skos:Concept
skos:broaderTransitive: genre:music
skos:inScheme: genre:LiteraryGenre

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ballet

"Dramatic entertainments consisting of dance and mime performed to music. Ballets are characterized by stylized poses and steps that are combined with light and flowing figures and movements, such as leaps and turns; often combined with music, scenery, costume, and sometimes pantomime or speech to convey a story, theme, or atmosphere to the audience." (Getty, 2017)

Comment: This term and its description were created from data gathered from the Getty Art & Architecture Thesaurus.
This term and its description were created from data gathered from DBpedia.

URI: http://sparql.cwrc.ca/ontologies/genre#ballet
Tag: genre:ballet
prov:wasDerivedFrom: dbpedia:Ballet http://vocab.getty.edu/aat/300389780
rdf:type: genre:LiteraryGenre skos:Concept
skos:inScheme: genre:LiteraryGenre

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bergamasque

"A folk dance originating in Bergamo, Italy, in the 16th century, but often included in theatre productions unrelated to Italian culture." (Merriam-Webster, 2017)

Comment: This term and its description were created from data gathered from the Merriam-Webster dictionary.
This term and its description were created from data gathered from DBpedia.

URI: http://sparql.cwrc.ca/ontologies/genre#bergamasque
Tag: genre:bergamasque
prov:wasDerivedFrom: dbpedia:Bergamask https://www.merriam-webster.com/dictionary/Bergamasque
rdf:type: genre:LiteraryGenre skos:Concept
skos:broaderTransitive: genre:drama
skos:inScheme: genre:LiteraryGenre

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bestiary

"Collections of moralized fables, especially as written in the Middle Ages, about actual or mythical animals." (Getty, 2017)

Comment: This term and its description were created from data gathered from the Getty Art & Architecture Thesaurus and were translated from English by Jade Penancier.
The description for this term is indebted to the Getty Art & Architecture Thesaurus.

URI: http://sparql.cwrc.ca/ontologies/genre#bestiary
Tag: genre:bestiary
prov:wasDerivedFrom: http://vocab.getty.edu/aat/300201056 http://www.universalis.fr/encyclopedie/bestiaires/
rdf:type: genre:LiteraryGenre skos:Concept
skos:inScheme: genre:LiteraryGenre

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biblical paraphrase

A work that rewords the text of the Bible, often to improve clarity or to make it accessible to a wider audience.

URI: http://sparql.cwrc.ca/ontologies/genre#biblicalParaphrase
Tag: genre:biblicalParaphrase
rdf:type: genre:LiteraryGenre skos:Concept
skos:broaderTransitive: genre:religious
skos:inScheme: genre:LiteraryGenre

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bildungsroman

"Novels of a traditional German genre that focuses on the spiritual development or formative years of an individual. Now in broad use to refer to this type of novel written in any language or in any culture." (Getty, 2017)

Comment: The description for this term is indebted to the Getty Art & Architecture Thesaurus.
The description for this term is indebted to DBpedia.

URI: http://sparql.cwrc.ca/ontologies/genre#bildungsroman
Tag: genre:bildungsroman
prov:wasDerivedFrom: dbpedia:Bildungsroman http://vocab.getty.edu/aat/300297857
rdf:type: genre:LiteraryGenre skos:Concept
skos:broaderTransitive: genre:novel
skos:inScheme: genre:LiteraryGenre
skos:narrowerTransitive: genre:kunstlerroman

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biographical dictionary

A reference text containing biographical entries on multiple people, often with a common link between them (for example, a biographical dictionary of women), and typically arranged alphabetically.

URI: http://sparql.cwrc.ca/ontologies/genre#biographicalDictionary
Tag: genre:biographicalDictionary
rdf:type: genre:LiteraryGenre skos:Concept
skos:broaderTransitive: genre:dictionary
skos:inScheme: genre:LiteraryGenre

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biography

1- "The genre of nonfiction that concerns accounts of the lives of individuals." (Getty, 2017)

2- "Brief profiles of a people's life or work." (Getty, 2017)

Comment: The description for this term is indebted to DBpedia.
The description for this term is indebted to the Getty Art & Architecture Thesaurus.

URI: http://sparql.cwrc.ca/ontologies/genre#biography
Tag: genre:biography
prov:wasDerivedFrom: dbpedia:Biography http://vocab.getty.edu/aat/300055908 http://vocab.getty.edu/aat/300404015
rdf:type: genre:LiteraryGenre skos:Concept
skos:inScheme: genre:LiteraryGenre

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bisexual fiction

Fiction dealing with bisexuality.

URI: http://sparql.cwrc.ca/ontologies/genre#bisexualFiction
Tag: genre:bisexualFiction
rdf:type: genre:LiteraryGenre skos:Concept
skos:broaderTransitive: genre:fiction
skos:inScheme: genre:LiteraryGenre

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black comedy

"A black comedy (or dark comedy) is a comic work that employs morbid humor, which, in its simplest form, is humor that makes light of subject matter usually considered taboo. Black humor corresponds to the earlier concept of gallows humor. Black comedy is often controversial due to its subject matter." (DBpedia, 2017)

Comment: The description for this term is indebted to DBpedia.

URI: http://sparql.cwrc.ca/ontologies/genre#blackComedy
Tag: genre:blackComedy
prov:wasDerivedFrom: dbpedia:Black_comedy
rdf:type: genre:LiteraryGenre skos:Concept
skos:broaderTransitive: genre:comedy
skos:inScheme: genre:LiteraryGenre

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bouts-rimés

"The result of a game popularized in 17th-century France in which a poet must write a logical poem using a list of random rhyming words written by someone else." (Oxford, 2015)

Comment: This term and its description were created from data gathered from the Oxford Dictionary of Literary Terms, 4th ed.

URI: http://sparql.cwrc.ca/ontologies/genre#boutsRimés
Tag: genre:boutsRimés
prov:wasDerivedFrom: http://www.oxfordreference.com/view/10.1093/acref/9780199208272.001.0001/acref-9780199208272-e-142?rskey=3RXM0b%26result=141
rdf:type: genre:LiteraryGenre skos:Concept
skos:broaderTransitive: genre:poetry
skos:inScheme: genre:LiteraryGenre

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broadside

"Large sheets of paper with a poem or song, especially a ballad, printed on only one side." (Oxford, 2015)

Comment: This term and its description were created from data gathered from the Oxford Dictionary of Literary Terms, 4th ed.

URI: http://sparql.cwrc.ca/ontologies/genre#broadside
Tag: genre:broadside
prov:wasDerivedFrom: http://www.collectionscanada.gc.ca/gramophone/028011-1038-f.html http://www.oxfordreference.com/view/10.1093/acref/9780199208272.001.0001/acref-9780199208272-e-149?rskey=LdAUjx%26result=141
rdf:type: genre:LiteraryGenre skos:Concept
skos:inScheme: genre:LiteraryGenre

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burletta

"A form of comic drama set to music, first popularized in the 1700s." (Penguin, 1999)

Comment: This term and its description were created from data gathered from the Penguin Dictionary of Literary Terms & Literary Theory, 4th ed.

URI: http://sparql.cwrc.ca/ontologies/genre#burletta
Tag: genre:burletta
prov:wasDerivedFrom: dbpedia:Burletta https://www.politicalavenue.com/10862/ENGLISH-LANGUAGE-BOOKS/English%20-%20Penguin%20Dictionary%20Of%20Literary%20Terms%20And%20Literary%20Theory.pdf
rdf:type: genre:LiteraryGenre skos:Concept
skos:broaderTransitive: genre:comedy
skos:inScheme: genre:LiteraryGenre

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cabaret

"Various forms of entertainment, often involving dancing, singing, or comedy acts, performed at a venue such as a nightclub in which the audience is seated at tables. Live music played in restaurants or public houses would not usually be considered cabaret without an additional component." (Oxford, 2015)

Comment: This term and its description were created from data gathered from the Oxford Dictionary of English, 3rd ed.

URI: http://sparql.cwrc.ca/ontologies/genre#cabaret
Tag: genre:cabaret
prov:wasDerivedFrom: http://www.oxfordreference.com/view/10.1093/acref/9780199571123.001.0001/m_en_gb0114080?rskey=xIWuHx%26result=12581
rdf:type: genre:LiteraryGenre skos:Concept
skos:inScheme: genre:LiteraryGenre

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captivity narrative

"Captivity narratives are usually stories of people captured by enemies whom they consider uncivilized, or whose beliefs and customs they oppose. The best-known captivity narratives are those concerning the indigenous peoples of North America. These narratives (and questions about their accuracy) have an enduring place in literature, history, ethnography, and the study of Native peoples. However, captivity narratives have also come to play a major role in the study of contemporary religious movements, thanks to scholars of religion like David G. Bromley and James R. Lewis. In this article, both main types of captivity narratives are considered. Traditionally, historians have made limited use of certain captivity narratives. They have regarded the genre with suspicion because of its ideological underpinnings. As a result of new scholarly approaches, historians with a more certain grasp of Native American cultures are distinguishing between plausible statements of fact and value-laden judgements in order to study the narratives as rare sources from "inside" Native societies. Contemporary historians such as Linda Colley and anthropologists such as Pauline Turner Strong have also found the narratives useful in analyzing how the colonists constructed the "other", as well as what the narratives reveal about the settlers' sense of themselves and their culture, and the experience of crossing the line to another. Colley has studied the long history of English captivity in other cultures, both the Barbary pirate captives who preceded those in North America, and British captives in cultures such as India, after the North American experience. Certain North American captivity narratives involving Native peoples were published from the 18th through the 19th centuries, but they reflected a well-established genre in English literature. There had already been English accounts of captivity by Barbary pirates, or in the Middle East, which established some of the major elements of the form. Following the American experience, additional accounts were written after British people were captured during exploration and settlement in India and East Asia. Other types of captivity narratives, such as those recounted by apostates from religious movements (i.e. "cult survivor" tales), have remained an enduring feature of modern media, and currently appear in books, periodicals, film, and television. The unifying factor in most captivity narratives, whether they stem from geopolitical or religious conflicts, is that the captive portrays the captors' way of life as alien, undesirable, and incompatible with the captive's own (typically dominant) culture. This underscores the utility of captivity narratives in garnering support for social control measures, such as removing Native Americans to "reservations", or stigmatizing participation in religious movements – whether Catholicism in the nineteenth century, or ISKCON in the twentieth. Captivity narratives tend to be culturally chauvinistic, viewing an "alien" culture through the lens of the narrator's preferred culture, thus making (possibly unfair) value judgements like "Puritans good, Indians bad."" (DBpedia, 2017)

Comment: The description for this term is indebted to DBpedia.

URI: http://sparql.cwrc.ca/ontologies/genre#captivityNarrative
Tag: genre:captivityNarrative
prov:wasDerivedFrom: dbpedia:Captivity_narrative
rdf:type: genre:LiteraryGenre skos:Concept
skos:broaderTransitive: genre:autobiography
skos:inScheme: genre:LiteraryGenre

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catechism

1- "Manuals or guides for instructing through a series of questions and answers, especially for religious instruction." (Getty, 2017)

2- "A catechism (/ˈkætəˌkizəm/; from Greek: κατηχέω, to teach orally), is a summary or exposition of doctrine and served as a learning introduction to the Sacraments traditionally used in catechesis, or Christian religious teaching of children and adult converts. Catechisms are doctrinal manuals - often in the form of questions followed by answers to be memorised - a format in non-religious or secular contexts as well. The term catechumen refers to the designated recipient of the catechetical work or instruction. In the Catholic Church, catachumens were usually placed separately during Holy Mass from those who received the Sacrament of Baptism. Early catecheticals emerged from Graeco-Roman mystery religions, especially the late cult of Mithras meant to educate their members into the secretive teachings, which competed with the Christian Church as an underground religion in the 1st to 4th centuries CE and allegedly shared its many ritual practices. Today, they are characteristic of Western Christianity but are also present in Eastern Christianity." (DBpedia, 2017)

Comment: The description for this term is indebted to DBpedia.
The description for this term is indebted to the Getty Art & Architecture Thesaurus.

URI: http://sparql.cwrc.ca/ontologies/genre#catechism
Tag: genre:catechism
prov:wasDerivedFrom: dbpedia:Catechism http://vocab.getty.edu/aat/300026460
rdf:type: genre:LiteraryGenre skos:Concept
skos:broaderTransitive: genre:religious
skos:inScheme: genre:LiteraryGenre

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chapbook

"Small books or pamphlets, usually cheaply printed and containing such texts as popular tales, treatises, ballads, or nursery rhymes, formerly peddled by chapmen." (Getty, 2017)

Comment: The description for this term is indebted to the Getty Art & Architecture Thesaurus.

URI: http://sparql.cwrc.ca/ontologies/genre#chapbook
Tag: genre:chapbook
prov:wasDerivedFrom: http://vocab.getty.edu/aat/300152367
rdf:type: genre:LiteraryGenre skos:Concept
skos:inScheme: genre:LiteraryGenre

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character sketch

"A character sketch is an abbreviated portrayal of a particular characteristic of people. The term originates in portraiture, where the character sketch is a common academic exercise. Following the translation of Theophrastus's Characters into English, a number of British and American painters attempted to illustrate the "types" of humanity. As late as William Hogarth, portraitists were doing studies of (in his case) Nine heads. The artist performing a character sketch attempts to capture an expression or gesture that goes beyond coincident actions and gets to the essence of the individual." (DBpedia, 2017)

Comment: The description for this term is indebted to DBpedia.

URI: http://sparql.cwrc.ca/ontologies/genre#character
Tag: genre:character
prov:wasDerivedFrom: dbpedia:Character_sketch
rdf:type: genre:LiteraryGenre skos:Concept
skos:inScheme: genre:LiteraryGenre

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charade

"A form of riddle in which clues are given about each syllable of a word so that the entire word may be guessed. Originally, these riddles were written, often in the form of a poem, but it soon gained popularity as a parlour game in which the clues were mimed rather than written in verse." (Encyclopædia Britannica, 2017)

Comment: This term and its description were created from data gathered from the Encyclopædia Britannica.
This term and its description were created from data gathered from the DVLF (Dictionnaire Vivant de la Langue Française).

URI: http://sparql.cwrc.ca/ontologies/genre#charade
Tag: genre:charade
prov:wasDerivedFrom: https://dvlf.uchicago.edu/mot/charade https://www.britannica.com/topic/charade-game
rdf:type: genre:LiteraryGenre skos:Concept
skos:inScheme: genre:LiteraryGenre

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childrens literature

"Literature written and published for children." (Getty, 2017)

Comment: The description for this term is indebted to the Getty Art & Architecture Thesaurus.

URI: http://sparql.cwrc.ca/ontologies/genre#childrensLiterature
Tag: genre:childrensLiterature
prov:wasDerivedFrom: http://vocab.getty.edu/aat/300263209
rdf:type: genre:LiteraryGenre skos:Concept
skos:inScheme: genre:LiteraryGenre
*skos:related: genre:fairytale
skos:narrowerTransitive: genre:nurseryRhyme genre:youngAdultWriting

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clerihew

"A clerihew is a whimsical, four-line biographical poem invented by Edmund Clerihew Bentley. The first line is the name of the poem's subject, usually a famous person put in an absurd light. The rhyme scheme is AABB, and the rhymes are often forced. The line length and metre are irregular. Bentley invented the clerihew in school and then popularized it in books." (DBpedia, 2017)

Comment: The description for this term is indebted to DBpedia.

URI: http://sparql.cwrc.ca/ontologies/genre#clerihew
Tag: genre:clerihew
prov:wasDerivedFrom: dbpedia:Clerihew
rdf:type: genre:LiteraryGenre skos:Concept
skos:broaderTransitive: genre:poetry
skos:inScheme: genre:LiteraryGenre

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closet drama

"A drama, often written in verse and frequently with extensive stage directions, that is meant to be read in private rather than performed for an audience." (Oxford, 2015)

Comment: This term and its description were created from data gathered from the Oxford Dictionary of Literary Terms, 4th ed.

URI: http://sparql.cwrc.ca/ontologies/genre#closetDrama
Tag: genre:closetDrama
prov:wasDerivedFrom: http://www.oxfordreference.com/view/10.1093/acref/9780199208272.001.0001/acref-9780199208272-e-214?rskey=qZ7ZtK%26result=211
rdf:type: genre:LiteraryGenre skos:Concept
skos:broaderTransitive: genre:drama
skos:inScheme: genre:LiteraryGenre

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coloring book

"Books containing outline drawings, for coloring in with crayons, watercolor, colored pencils, or other media, usually intended for use by children." (Getty, 2017)

Comment: The description for this term is indebted to the Getty Art & Architecture Thesaurus.

URI: http://sparql.cwrc.ca/ontologies/genre#colouringBook
Tag: genre:colouringBook
prov:wasDerivedFrom: http://vocab.getty.edu/aat/300026449
rdf:type: genre:LiteraryGenre skos:Concept
skos:inScheme: genre:LiteraryGenre

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comedy

"Genre encompassing forms of theatre, literature, and improvisation with the basic objective to amuse, humor, and induce laughter. In general, it is often contrasted with tragedy and can be applied in the form of social criticism through satire and political or intellectual wit or applied in the form of pure spectacle through farce or burlesque." (Getty, 2017)

Comment: The description for this term is indebted to the Getty Art & Architecture Thesaurus.

URI: http://sparql.cwrc.ca/ontologies/genre#comedy
Tag: genre:comedy
prov:wasDerivedFrom: http://vocab.getty.edu/aat/300055911
rdf:type: genre:LiteraryGenre skos:Concept
skos:broaderTransitive: genre:drama
skos:inScheme: genre:LiteraryGenre
skos:narrowerTransitive: genre:blackComedy genre:burletta genre:comedyOfIntrigue genre:comedyOfManners genre:comedyOfMenace genre:farce

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comedy of intrigue

"A dramatic form popularized in the 16th century in which the comedy depends on complex plots, surprising twists, and ridiculous situations. The characters and their development tend to be secondary to plot in importance." (Penguin, 1999)

Comment: This term and its description were created from data gathered from the Penguin Dictionary of Literary Terms & Literary Theory, 4th ed.

URI: http://sparql.cwrc.ca/ontologies/genre#comedyOfIntrigue
Tag: genre:comedyOfIntrigue
prov:wasDerivedFrom: https://www.politicalavenue.com/10862/ENGLISH-LANGUAGE-BOOKS/English%20-%20Penguin%20Dictionary%20Of%20Literary%20Terms%20And%20Literary%20Theory.pdf
rdf:type: genre:LiteraryGenre skos:Concept
skos:broaderTransitive: genre:comedy
skos:inScheme: genre:LiteraryGenre

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comedy of manners

"The comedy of manners is an entertainment form which satirizes the manners and affectations of a social class or of multiple classes, often represented by stereotypical stock characters. For example, the miles gloriosus ("boastful soldier") in ancient times, the fop and the rake during the English Restoration, or an old person pretending to be young. Restoration comedy is used as a synonym for "comedy of manners". The plot of the comedy, often concerned with scandal, is generally less important than its witty dialogue. A great writer of comedies of manners was Oscar Wilde, his most famous play being The Importance of Being Earnest. The comedy of manners was first developed in the new comedy of the Ancient Greek playwright Menander. His style, elaborate plots, and stock characters were imitated by the Roman playwrights Plautus and Terence, whose comedies were widely known and copied during the Renaissance. The best-known comedies of manners, however, may well be those of the French playwright Molière, who satirized the hypocrisy and pretension of the ancien régime in such plays as L'École des femmes (The School for Wives, 1662), Le Misanthrope (The Misanthrope, 1666), and most famously Tartuffe (1664)." (DBpedia, 2017)

Comment: The description for this term is indebted to DBpedia.

URI: http://sparql.cwrc.ca/ontologies/genre#comedyOfManners
Tag: genre:comedyOfManners
prov:wasDerivedFrom: dbpedia:Comedy_of_manners
rdf:type: genre:LiteraryGenre skos:Concept
skos:broaderTransitive: genre:comedy
skos:inScheme: genre:LiteraryGenre

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comedy of menace

"A type of comedic drama in which the dark humour stems from the main characters’ fear, irrational or not, that some dark force threatens them." (Penguin, 1999)

Comment: This term and its description were created from data gathered from the Penguin Dictionary of Literary Terms & Literary Theory, 4th ed.

URI: http://sparql.cwrc.ca/ontologies/genre#comedyOfMenace
Tag: genre:comedyOfMenace
prov:wasDerivedFrom: https://www.politicalavenue.com/10862/ENGLISH-LANGUAGE-BOOKS/English%20-%20Penguin%20Dictionary%20Of%20Literary%20Terms%20And%20Literary%20Theory.pdf
rdf:type: genre:LiteraryGenre skos:Concept
skos:broaderTransitive: genre:comedy
skos:inScheme: genre:LiteraryGenre

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comicbook

"Sequence of illustrations containing a story or stories (called "comics," because some are humorous), often serialized, published in booklet form." (Getty, 2017)

Comment: The description for this term is indebted to the Getty Art & Architecture Thesaurus.

URI: http://sparql.cwrc.ca/ontologies/genre#comicbook
Tag: genre:comicbook
prov:wasDerivedFrom: http://vocab.getty.edu/aat/300203177
rdf:type: genre:LiteraryGenre skos:Concept
skos:inScheme: genre:LiteraryGenre

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coming out

Pertaining to the process of coming out sexually.

URI: http://sparql.cwrc.ca/ontologies/genre#comingOut
Tag: genre:comingOut
rdf:type: genre:LiteraryGenre skos:Concept
skos:inScheme: genre:LiteraryGenre

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common place book

"Books in which noteworthy literary passages, cogent quotations, poems, comments, recipes, prescriptions, and other miscellaneous document types are written." (Getty, 2017)

Comment: The description for this term is indebted to the Getty Art & Architecture Thesaurus.

URI: http://sparql.cwrc.ca/ontologies/genre#commonPlaceBook
Tag: genre:commonPlaceBook
prov:wasDerivedFrom: http://vocab.getty.edu/aat/300027093
rdf:type: genre:LiteraryGenre skos:Concept
skos:inScheme: genre:LiteraryGenre

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companion

An authoritative and often academic handbook or collection providing a guide to and overview of a subject field, composed of short entries or longer essays, and generally encycopedic in scope or structure.

URI: http://sparql.cwrc.ca/ontologies/genre#companion
Tag: genre:companion
rdf:type: genre:LiteraryGenre skos:Concept
skos:broaderTransitive: genre:scholarship
skos:inScheme: genre:LiteraryGenre

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computer program

"A compilation of coded instructions or sequence of code that, when run, achieves a certain task in a mechanism, usually a computer." (Getty, 2017)

Comment: The description for this term is indebted to the Getty Art & Architecture Thesaurus.

URI: http://sparql.cwrc.ca/ontologies/genre#computerProgram
Tag: genre:computerProgram
prov:wasDerivedFrom: http://vocab.getty.edu/aat/300312188
rdf:type: genre:LiteraryGenre skos:Concept
skos:inScheme: genre:LiteraryGenre

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condition of england novel

A form of narrative fiction, named for a phrase from Thomas Carlyle's “Chartism” (1839), that addresses Victorian social and political issues with a focus on political unrest and class conflict, and typically seeks to instill empathy for the poor and understanding of social iniquities and injustices. Closely related to the industrial novel because of its interest in the impact of the industrial revolution.

URI: http://sparql.cwrc.ca/ontologies/genre#conditionOfEnglandNovel
Tag: genre:conditionOfEnglandNovel
rdf:type: genre:LiteraryGenre skos:Concept
skos:broaderTransitive: genre:novel genre:politicalWriting
skos:inScheme: genre:LiteraryGenre

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conduct literature

"Prescriptive literature, usually directed to a specific gender, that outlines the rules of appropriate behaviour according to the gender roles and societal norms prevalent at the time of writing. Conduct books became very popular in the 18th century." (Penguin, 1999)

Comment: This term and its description were created from data gathered from the Penguin Dictionary of Literary Terms & Literary Theory, 4th ed.
This term and its description were created from data gathered from DBpedia.

URI: http://sparql.cwrc.ca/ontologies/genre#conductLiterature
Tag: genre:conductLiterature
prov:wasDerivedFrom: dbpedia:Conduct_book https://www.politicalavenue.com/10862/ENGLISH-LANGUAGE-BOOKS/English%20-%20Penguin%20Dictionary%20Of%20Literary%20Terms%20And%20Literary%20Theory.pdf
rdf:type: genre:LiteraryGenre skos:Concept
skos:inScheme: genre:LiteraryGenre

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cookbook

1- "Reference publications containing collections of recipes with ancillary content on selection of ingredients or the broader context of the types of cooking presented. Contemporary cookbooks may focus on cultural or regional themes." (Getty, 2017)

2- "A cookbook (sometimes cookery book in Commonwealth English or cook book) is a kitchen reference publication that typically contains a collection of recipes. Modern versions may also include colorful illustrations and advice on purchasing quality ingredients or making substitutions. Cookbooks can also cover a wide variety of topics, including cooking techniques for the home, recipes and commentary from famous chefs, institutional kitchen manuals, and cultural commentary." (DBpedia, 2017)

Comment: The description for this term is indebted to DBpedia.
The description for this term is indebted to the Getty Art & Architecture Thesaurus.

URI: http://sparql.cwrc.ca/ontologies/genre#cookbook
Tag: genre:cookbook
prov:wasDerivedFrom: dbpedia:Cookbook http://vocab.getty.edu/aat/300026109
rdf:type: genre:LiteraryGenre skos:Concept
skos:broaderTransitive: genre:informationalWriting
skos:inScheme: genre:LiteraryGenre

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courtship fiction

Fiction in which courtship is a major part of the plot.

URI: http://sparql.cwrc.ca/ontologies/genre#courtshipFiction
Tag: genre:courtshipFiction
rdf:type: genre:LiteraryGenre skos:Concept
skos:broaderTransitive: genre:fiction genre:romance
skos:inScheme: genre:LiteraryGenre

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criminology

Scholarship, typically non-fiction, dealing with the study of crime, criminals, and criminal justice.

URI: http://sparql.cwrc.ca/ontologies/genre#criminology
Tag: genre:criminology
rdf:type: genre:LiteraryGenre skos:Concept
skos:broaderTransitive: genre:socialScience
skos:inScheme: genre:LiteraryGenre

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dedication

"A short bit of text conventionally appearing before the start of a novel or poem in which the author or poet addresses some individual, invoking his or her gratitude or thanks to that individual. Frequently, the dedication is to a spouse, friend, loved one, child, mentor, or individual who inspired the work. Several of the Inklings dedicated specific fictional works to each other (or in the case of C.S. Lewis, to children of fellow Inklings). Among scholars, one of the most significant types of dedications is a festschrift. A festschrift is a collection of essays or studies in book form, dedicated to a former teacher or professor in his or her advanced age. The individual scholarly writings come from his or her students, who typically collaborate to organize the work and contact the publisher, and they present the collection to the teacher upon its publication." (L. K Wheeler, 2017)

Comment: The description for this term is indebted to Dr. L. Kip Wheeler of Carson-Newman University.
This term and its description were created from data gathered from DBpedia.

URI: http://sparql.cwrc.ca/ontologies/genre#dedication
Tag: genre:dedication
prov:wasDerivedFrom: dbpedia:Dedication_(publishing) http://web.cn.edu/kwheeler/lit_terms_d.html
rdf:type: genre:LiteraryGenre skos:Concept
skos:broaderTransitive: genre:paratext
skos:inScheme: genre:LiteraryGenre

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detective

Detective fiction is a subgenre of crime fiction and mystery fiction in which an investigator or a detective—either professional or amateur—investigates a crime, often murder.

Comment: The description for this term is indebted to DBpedia.
This term and its description were created from data gathered from DBpedia.

URI: http://sparql.cwrc.ca/ontologies/genre#detective
Tag: genre:detective
prov:wasDerivedFrom: dbpedia:Crime_fiction dbpedia:Detective_fiction
rdf:type: genre:LiteraryGenre skos:Concept
skos:broaderTransitive: genre:mystery
skos:inScheme: genre:LiteraryGenre

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devotional

"Christian devotional literature (also called devotionals or Christian living literature) is religious writing that is neither doctrinal nor theological, but designed for individuals to read for their personal edification and spiritual formation. Theologian Karl Holl has suggested that devotional literature came into full development at the time of Pietism during the second half of the 17th century." (DBpedia, 2017)

Comment: The description for this term is indebted to DBpedia.

URI: http://sparql.cwrc.ca/ontologies/genre#devotional
Tag: genre:devotional
prov:wasDerivedFrom: dbpedia:Christian_devotional_literature
rdf:type: genre:LiteraryGenre skos:Concept
skos:broaderTransitive: genre:religious
skos:inScheme: genre:LiteraryGenre

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dialogue of the dead

"A popular style of fiction in the 17th and 18th centuries featuring conversations between the ghosts of well-known figures. Based on the satirical Dialogues of the Dead by Lucian (120-around 180 CE), but not necessarily satirical themselves." (Mazella, 2007)

Comment: This term and its description were created from data gathered from The Making of Modern Cynicism.
This term and its description were created from data gathered from data.bnf.fr.

URI: http://sparql.cwrc.ca/ontologies/genre#dialogueOfTheDead
Tag: genre:dialogueOfTheDead
prov:wasDerivedFrom: http://data.bnf.fr/15609782/dialogues_des_morts/ https://books.google.ca/books?id=8zBk8k35SFEC&printsec=frontcover#v=onepage&q&f=false
rdf:type: genre:LiteraryGenre skos:Concept
skos:broaderTransitive: genre:dialogueOrDebate
skos:inScheme: genre:LiteraryGenre

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dialogue or debate

"A text made up of a conversation between two or more characters, often in which the characters take up opposing sides of an argument." (Oxford, 2015)

Comment: This term and its description were created from data gathered from the Oxford Dictionary of Literary Terms, 4th ed.
This term and its description were created from data gathered from data.bnf.fr.

[skos:altLabel: dialogue ]

URI: http://sparql.cwrc.ca/ontologies/genre#dialogueOrDebate
Tag: genre:dialogueOrDebate
prov:wasDerivedFrom: http://data.bnf.fr/12281035/dialogues/ http://www.oxfordreference.com/view/10.1093/acref/9780199208272.001.0001/acref-9780199208272-e-310?rskey=TydJW0%26result=301
rdf:type: genre:LiteraryGenre skos:Concept
skos:inScheme: genre:LiteraryGenre
skos:narrowerTransitive: genre:dialogueOfTheDead

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diary

"Refers to books containing the daily, personal accounts of the writer's own experiences, attitudes, and observations. Use "journals (accounts)" when referring to an individual's or an organization's account of occurrences or transactions." (Getty, 2017)

Comment: The description for this term is indebted to the Getty Art & Architecture Thesaurus.

URI: http://sparql.cwrc.ca/ontologies/genre#diary
Tag: genre:diary
prov:wasDerivedFrom: http://vocab.getty.edu/aat/300027112
rdf:type: genre:LiteraryGenre skos:Concept
skos:broaderTransitive: genre:autobiography
skos:inScheme: genre:LiteraryGenre

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dictionary

"Reference sources containing alphabetical lists of words with information given for each word; generally including meanings, pronunciation, etymology, and often usage guidance." (Getty, 2017)

Comment: The description for this term is indebted to the Getty Art & Architecture Thesaurus.

URI: http://sparql.cwrc.ca/ontologies/genre#dictionary
Tag: genre:dictionary
prov:wasDerivedFrom: http://vocab.getty.edu/aat/300026186
rdf:type: genre:LiteraryGenre skos:Concept
skos:broaderTransitive: genre:scholarship
skos:inScheme: genre:LiteraryGenre
skos:narrowerTransitive: genre:biographicalDictionary genre:directory genre:encyclopaedia genre:thesaurus

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didactic

"Writing that is "preachy" or seeks overtly to convince a reader of a particular point or lesson. Medieval homilies and Victorian moral essays are often held up as examples of didactic literature, but one might argue that all literature is didactic to one extent or another since the written word frequently implies or suggests an authorial attitude. Sometimes, the lesson is overtly religious, as in the case of sermons or in literature like Milton's Paradise Lost, which seeks to "justify God's ways to men." In a more subtle way, much of Romantic literature hints at a critique of urbanized and mechanized life in 19th-century London." (L. K Wheeler, 2017)

Comment: The description for this term is indebted to Dr. L. Kip Wheeler of Carson-Newman University.

URI: http://sparql.cwrc.ca/ontologies/genre#didactic
Tag: genre:didactic
prov:wasDerivedFrom: http://web.cn.edu/kwheeler/lit_terms_d.html
rdf:type: genre:LiteraryGenre skos:Concept
skos:broaderTransitive: genre:thematicWriting
skos:inScheme: genre:LiteraryGenre

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directory

"Enumerations of names, addresses, and other data about specific groups of persons or organizations; may appear in alphabetic or graphic format." (Getty, 2017)

Comment: The description for this term is indebted to the Getty Art & Architecture Thesaurus.

URI: http://sparql.cwrc.ca/ontologies/genre#directory
Tag: genre:directory
prov:wasDerivedFrom: http://vocab.getty.edu/aat/300026234
rdf:type: genre:LiteraryGenre skos:Concept
skos:broaderTransitive: genre:dictionary
skos:inScheme: genre:LiteraryGenre

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dissertation

"Written treatises, or the records of a discourse on a subject, usually prepared and presented as the final requirement for a degree or diploma and typically based on independent research and giving evidence of the candidate's mastery of the subject and of scholarly method." (Getty, 2017)

Comment: This term and its description were created from data gathered from the Getty Art & Architecture Thesaurus.

URI: http://sparql.cwrc.ca/ontologies/genre#dissertation
Tag: genre:dissertation
prov:wasDerivedFrom: http://vocab.getty.edu/aat/300028029
rdf:type: genre:LiteraryGenre skos:Concept
skos:broaderTransitive: genre:scholarship
skos:inScheme: genre:LiteraryGenre

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documentary

"Written, oral, sound, or photographic recordings, or presentations in other media that explain or re-create actual events, eras, life stories, or other factual information in a manner purporting to be objective and accurate." (Getty, 2017)

Comment: This term and its description were created from data gathered from the Getty Art & Architecture Thesaurus.

URI: http://sparql.cwrc.ca/ontologies/genre#documentary
Tag: genre:documentary
prov:wasDerivedFrom: http://vocab.getty.edu/aat/300249172
rdf:type: genre:LiteraryGenre skos:Concept
skos:broaderTransitive: genre:informationalWriting
skos:inScheme: genre:LiteraryGenre

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domestic

"Domestic realism normally refers to the genre of nineteenth-century novels popular with women readers. This body of writing is also known as "sentimental fiction" or "woman's fiction". The genre is mainly reflected in the novel though short-stories and non-fiction works such as Harriet Beecher Stowe's "Our Country Neighbors" and The New Housekeeper's Manual written by Stowe and her sister-in-law Catharine Beecher are works of domestic realism. The style's particular characteristics are: "1. Plot focuses on a heroine who embodies one of two types of exemplar: the angel and the practical woman (Reynolds) who sometimes exist in the same work. Baym says that this heroine is contrasted with the passive woman (incompetent, cowardly, ignorant; often the heroine's mother is this type) and the "belle," who is deprived of a proper education. 2. The heroine struggles for self-mastery, learning the pain of conquering her own passions (Tompkins, Sensational Designs, 172). 3. The heroine learns to balance society's demands for self-denial with her own desire for autonomy, a struggle often addressed in terms of religion. 4. She suffers at the hands of abusers of power before establishing a network of surrogate kin. 5. The plots "repeatedly identify immersion in feeling as one of the great temptations and dangers for a developing woman. They show that feeling must be controlled. . . " (Baym 25). Frances Cogan notes that the heroines thus undergo a full education within which to realize feminine obligations (The All-American Girl). 6. The tales generally end with marriage, usually one of two possible kinds: A. Reforming the bad or "wild" male, as in Augusta Evans's St. Elmo (1867) B. Marrying the solid male who already meets her qualifications.Examples: Maria Cummins, The Lamplighter (1854) and Susan Warner, The Wide, Wide World (1850) 7. The novels may use a "language of tears" that evokes sympathy from the readers. 8. Richard Brodhead (Cultures of Letters) sees class as an important issue, as the ideal family or heroine is poised between a lower-class family exemplifying poverty and domestic disorganization and upper-class characters exemplifying an idle, frivolous existence (94)." An example of this style of novel is Jane Smiley's A Thousand Acres in which the main character's confinement is emphasized in such a way. Some early exponents of the genre of domestic realism were Jane Austen and Elizabeth Barrett Browning." (DBpedia, 2017)

Comment: The description for this term is indebted to DBpedia.

URI: http://sparql.cwrc.ca/ontologies/genre#domestic
Tag: genre:domestic
prov:wasDerivedFrom: dbpedia:Domestic_realism
rdf:type: genre:LiteraryGenre skos:Concept
skos:broaderTransitive: genre:novel genre:thematicWriting
skos:inScheme: genre:LiteraryGenre

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drama

"A composition in prose or verse presenting, in pantomime and dialogue, a narrative involving conflict between a character or characters and some external or internal force (see conflict). Playwrights usually design dramas for presentation on a stage in front of an audience. Aristotle called drama "imitated human action." Drama may have originated in religious ceremonies. Thespis of Attica (sixth century BCE) was the first recorded composer of a tragedy. Tragedies in their earliest stage were performed by a single actor who interacted with the chorus. The playwright Aeschylus added a second actor on the stage (deuteragonist) to allow additional conflict and dialogue. Sophocles and Euripides added a third (tritagonist). Medieval drama may have evolved independently from rites commemorating the birth and death of Christ. During the late medieval period and the early Renaissance, drama gradually altered to the form we know today. The mid-sixteenth century in England in particular was one of the greatest periods of world drama. In traditional Greek drama, as defined by Aristotle, a play was to consist of five acts and follow the three dramatic unities. In more recent drama (i.e., during the last two centuries), plays have frequently consisted of three acts, and playwrights have felt more comfortable disregarding the confines of Aristotelian rules involving verisimilitude. See also unities, comedy, tragedy, revenge play, miracle play, morality play, and mystery play. An individual work of drama is called a play." (L. K Wheeler, 2017)

Comment: The description for this term is indebted to Dr. L. Kip Wheeler of Carson-Newman University.

URI: http://sparql.cwrc.ca/ontologies/genre#drama
Tag: genre:drama
prov:wasDerivedFrom: http://web.cn.edu/kwheeler/lit_terms_d.html
rdf:type: genre:LiteraryGenre skos:Concept
skos:inScheme: genre:LiteraryGenre
skos:narrowerTransitive: genre:afterpiece genre:agitprop genre:balladOpera genre:bergamasque genre:closetDrama genre:comedy genre:kitchenSinkDrama genre:melodrama genre:monologue genre:moralityOrMysteryPlay genre:oneActPlay genre:pageant genre:panegyric genre:pantomime genre:radioDrama genre:theatreOfCruelty genre:theatreOfTheAbsurd genre:thematicWriting genre:tragedy genre:tragicomedy

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dramatic monologue

"Dramatic monologue, also known as a persona poem, is a type of poetry written in the form of a speech of an individual character. M.H. Abrams notes the following three features of the dramatic monologue as it applies to poetry." (DBpedia, 2017)

Comment: The description for this term is indebted to DBpedia.

URI: http://sparql.cwrc.ca/ontologies/genre#dramaticMonologue
Tag: genre:dramaticMonologue
prov:wasDerivedFrom: dbpedia:Dramatic_monologue
rdf:type: genre:LiteraryGenre skos:Concept
skos:broaderTransitive: genre:poetry
skos:inScheme: genre:LiteraryGenre

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dream vision

"Literature, typically a poem and frequently an allegory or symbolic tale, in which the plot is a dream recounted by a narrator who dreamed it." (Oxford, 2015)

Comment: This term and its description were created from data gathered from the Oxford Dictionary of Literary Terms, 4th ed.

URI: http://sparql.cwrc.ca/ontologies/genre#dreamVision
Tag: genre:dreamVision
prov:wasDerivedFrom: http://www.oxfordreference.com/view/10.1093/acref/9780199208272.001.0001/acref-9780199208272-e-351?rskey=MMt5zw%26result=351
rdf:type: genre:LiteraryGenre skos:Concept
skos:inScheme: genre:LiteraryGenre

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dystopia

"(from Greek, dys topos, "bad place"): The opposite of a utopia, a dystopia is an imaginary society in fictional writing that represents, as M. H. Abrams puts it, "a very unpleasant imaginary world in which ominous tendencies of our present social, political, and technological order are projected in some disastrous future culmination" (Glossary 218). For instance, while a utopia presents readers with a place where all the citizens are happy and ruled by a virtuous, efficient, rational government, a dystopia presents readers with a world where all citizens are universally unhappy, manipulated, and repressed by a sinister, sadistic totalitarian state. This government exists at best to further its own power and at worst seeks actively to destroy its own citizens' creativity, health, and happiness. Examples of fictional dystopias include Aldous Huxley's Brave New World, George Orwell's 1984, Margaret Atwood's The Handmaid's Tale, and Ursula Le Guin's The Dispossessed." (L. K Wheeler, 2017)

Comment: The description for this term is indebted to Dr. L. Kip Wheeler of Carson-Newman University.

URI: http://sparql.cwrc.ca/ontologies/genre#dystopia
Tag: genre:dystopia
cwrc:contraryTo: genre:utopia
prov:wasDerivedFrom: http://web.cn.edu/kwheeler/lit_terms_d.html
rdf:type: genre:LiteraryGenre skos:Concept
skos:broaderTransitive: genre:fiction
skos:inScheme: genre:LiteraryGenre

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eclogue

"An eclogue is a poem in a classical style on a pastoral subject. Poems in the genre are sometimes also called bucolics." (DBpedia, 2017)

Comment: The description for this term is indebted to DBpedia.

URI: http://sparql.cwrc.ca/ontologies/genre#eclogue
Tag: genre:eclogue
prov:wasDerivedFrom: dbpedia:Eclogue
rdf:type: genre:LiteraryGenre skos:Concept
skos:inScheme: genre:LiteraryGenre

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elegy

"Mournful, melancholy, or plaintive poems, especially funeral songs or laments for the dead." (Getty, 2017)

Comment: The description for this term is indebted to the Getty Art & Architecture Thesaurus.
The description for this term is indebted to DBpedia.

URI: http://sparql.cwrc.ca/ontologies/genre#elegy
Tag: genre:elegy
prov:wasDerivedFrom: dbpedia:Elegy http://vocab.getty.edu/aat/300026285
rdf:type: genre:LiteraryGenre skos:Concept
skos:broaderTransitive: genre:poetry
skos:inScheme: genre:LiteraryGenre

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encyclopaedia

"Books, set of books, or disks, containing informational articles on subjects in every field of knowledge, or limited to a special field or subject, usually arranged in alphabetical order." (Getty, 2017)

Comment: The description for this term is indebted to the Getty Art & Architecture Thesaurus.

URI: http://sparql.cwrc.ca/ontologies/genre#encyclopaedia
Tag: genre:encyclopaedia
prov:wasDerivedFrom: http://vocab.getty.edu/aat/300129439
rdf:type: genre:LiteraryGenre skos:Concept
skos:broaderTransitive: genre:dictionary
skos:inScheme: genre:LiteraryGenre

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epic

"Meaning extended from "epic poetry," in modern usage refers to literary art forms, such as prose, poetry, plays, films, and other works where the story has a theme of grandeur and heroism." (Getty, 2017)

Comment: The description for this term is indebted to the Getty Art & Architecture Thesaurus.

URI: http://sparql.cwrc.ca/ontologies/genre#epic
Tag: genre:epic
prov:wasDerivedFrom: http://vocab.getty.edu/aat/300404209
rdf:type: genre:LiteraryGenre skos:Concept
skos:inScheme: genre:LiteraryGenre

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epigram

"Refers to short satiric poems or any similar pointed sayings." (Getty, 2017)

Comment: The description for this term is indebted to DBpedia.
The description for this term is indebted to the Getty Art & Architecture Thesaurus.

URI: http://sparql.cwrc.ca/ontologies/genre#epigram
Tag: genre:epigram
prov:wasDerivedFrom: dbpedia:Epigram http://vocab.getty.edu/aat/300202533
rdf:type: genre:LiteraryGenre skos:Concept
skos:inScheme: genre:LiteraryGenre

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epilogue

"A conclusion added to a literary work such as a novel, play, or long poem. It is the opposite of a prologue. Often, the epilogue refers to the moral of a fable. Sometimes, it is a speech made by one of the actors at the end of a play asking for the indulgence of the critics and the audience. Shakespeare's A Midsummer Night's Dream contains one of the most famous epilogues. Contrast with prologue. Do not confuse the term with eclogue." (L. K Wheeler, 2017)

Comment: The description for this term is indebted to Dr. L. Kip Wheeler of Carson-Newman University.

URI: http://sparql.cwrc.ca/ontologies/genre#epilogue
Tag: genre:epilogue
prov:wasDerivedFrom: dbpedia:Epilogue http://web.cn.edu/kwheeler/lit_terms_e.html
rdf:type: genre:LiteraryGenre skos:Concept
skos:broaderTransitive: genre:paratext
skos:inScheme: genre:LiteraryGenre

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epistle

"Literary genre taking the form of letters, usually of a literary, formal, or public nature. Examples are the epistles in the Biblical New Testament." (Getty, 2017)

Comment: The description for this term is indebted to the Getty Art & Architecture Thesaurus.
The description for this term is indebted to DBpedia.

URI: http://sparql.cwrc.ca/ontologies/genre#epistle
Tag: genre:epistle
prov:wasDerivedFrom: dbpedia:Epistle http://vocab.getty.edu/aat/300404697
rdf:type: genre:LiteraryGenre skos:Concept
skos:broaderTransitive: genre:epistolary
skos:inScheme: genre:LiteraryGenre

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epistolary

"Novels written by using the device of a series of letters, diary entries, newspaper clippings, or other documents." (Getty, 2017)

Comment: The description for this term is indebted to DBpedia.
The description for this term is indebted to the Getty Art & Architecture Thesaurus.

URI: http://sparql.cwrc.ca/ontologies/genre#epistolary
Tag: genre:epistolary
prov:wasDerivedFrom: dbpedia:Epistolary_poem http://vocab.getty.edu/aat/300410324
rdf:type: genre:LiteraryGenre skos:Concept
skos:inScheme: genre:LiteraryGenre
skos:narrowerTransitive: genre:epistle genre:letter genre:lettersfromthedeadtotheliving

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epitaph

"An epitaph (from Greek ἐπιτάφιος epitaphios "a funeral oration" from ἐπί epi "at, over" and τάφος taphos "tomb") is a short text honoring a deceased person. Strictly speaking, it refers to text that is inscribed on a tombstone or plaque, but it may also be used in a figurative sense. Some epitaphs are specified by the person themselves before their death, while others are chosen by those responsible for the burial. An epitaph may be written in prose or in poem verse; poets have been known to compose their own epitaphs prior to their death." (DBpedia, 2018)

Comment: This term and its description were created from data gathered from DBpedia.

URI: http://sparql.cwrc.ca/ontologies/genre#epitaph
Tag: genre:epitaph
prov:wasDerivedFrom: dbpedia:Epitaph
rdf:type: genre:LiteraryGenre skos:Concept
skos:inScheme: genre:LiteraryGenre
skos:narrower: http://vocab.getty.edu/aat/300028729

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epithalamium

"An epithalamiumLatin form of Greek (ἐπιθαλάμιον epithalamion from ἐπί epi "upon," and θάλαμος thalamos nuptial chamber) is a poem written specifically for the bride on the way to her marital chamber. This form continued in popularity through the history of the classical world; the Roman poet Catullus wrote a famous epithalamium, which was translated from or at least inspired by a now-lost work of Sappho. According to Origen, Song of Songs, might be an epithalamium on the marriage of Solomon with Pharaoh’s daughter." (DBpedia, 2017)

Comment: The description for this term is indebted to DBpedia.

URI: http://sparql.cwrc.ca/ontologies/genre#epithalamium
Tag: genre:epithalamium
prov:wasDerivedFrom: dbpedia:Epithalamium
rdf:type: genre:LiteraryGenre skos:Concept
skos:broaderTransitive: genre:poetry
skos:inScheme: genre:LiteraryGenre

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epyllion

"Brief narrative poems in dactylic hexameter of ancient Greece, imitated by Romans and others. Usually dealing with mythological and romantic themes. They are characterized by lively description, miniaturistic attitude, scholarly allusion, and an elevated tone similar to that of the elegy." (Getty, 2017)

Comment: This term and its description were created from data gathered from DBpedia.
The description for this term is indebted to the Getty Art & Architecture Thesaurus.

URI: http://sparql.cwrc.ca/ontologies/genre#epyllion
Tag: genre:epyllion
prov:wasDerivedFrom: dbpedia:Epyllion http://vocab.getty.edu/aat/300410360
rdf:type: genre:LiteraryGenre skos:Concept
skos:inScheme: genre:LiteraryGenre

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erotica pornography

"Literature, graphic art, or moving images in which much or all of the content is of a sexual nature. While pornography tends to be exclusively intended to arouse the reader or viewer, erotica typically uses sexual content to express the beauty of the human body as a form of art." (Encyclopædia Britannica, 2017)

Comment: This term and its description were created from data gathered from the Encyclopædia Britannica.

[skos:altLabel: erotica ]

URI: http://sparql.cwrc.ca/ontologies/genre#eroticaPornography
Tag: genre:eroticaPornography
prov:wasDerivedFrom: https://www.britannica.com/art/erotica
rdf:type: genre:LiteraryGenre skos:Concept
skos:inScheme: genre:LiteraryGenre

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essay

"Short literary compositions on single subjects, often presenting the personal view of the author." (Getty, 2017)

Comment: The description for this term is indebted to the Getty Art & Architecture Thesaurus.
The description for this term is indebted to DBpedia.

URI: http://sparql.cwrc.ca/ontologies/genre#essay
Tag: genre:essay
prov:wasDerivedFrom: dbpedia:Essay http://vocab.getty.edu/aat/300026291
rdf:type: genre:LiteraryGenre skos:Concept
skos:inScheme: genre:LiteraryGenre

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eulogy

"A eulogy (from εὐλογία, eulogia, Classical Greek for "praise") is a speech or writing in praise of a person(s) or thing(s), especially one who recently died or retired or as a term of endearment. Eulogies may be given as part of funeral services. They take place in a funeral home during or after a wake. However, some denominations either discourage or do not permit eulogies at services to maintain respect for traditions. Eulogies can also praise people who are still alive. This normally takes place on special occasions like birthdays, office parties, retirement celebrations, etc. Eulogies should not be confused with elegies, which are poems written in tribute to the dead; nor with obituaries, which are published biographies recounting the lives of those who have recently died; nor with obsequies, which refer generally to the rituals surrounding funerals. Catholic priests are prohibited by the rubrics of the Mass from presenting a eulogy for the deceased in place of a homily during a funeral Mass. The modern use of the word eulogy was first documented in the 15th century and came from the Medieval Latin term “eulogium” (Merriam-Webster 2012). “Eulogium” at that time has since turned into the shorter “eulogy” of today. Eulogies are usually delivered by a family member or a close family friend in the case of a dead person. For a living eulogy given in such cases as a retirement, a senior colleague could perhaps deliver it. On occasions, eulogies are given to those who are severely ill or elderly in order to express words of love and gratitude before they die. Eulogies are not limited to merely people, however; Places or things can also be given eulogies (which anyone can deliver), but these are less common than those delivered to people, whether living or deceased." (DBpedia, 2017)

Comment: The description for this term is indebted to DBpedia.

URI: http://sparql.cwrc.ca/ontologies/genre#eulogy
Tag: genre:eulogy
prov:wasDerivedFrom: dbpedia:Eulogy
rdf:type: genre:LiteraryGenre skos:Concept
skos:inScheme: genre:LiteraryGenre

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exhibition catalogue

"Publications that document the works displayed in an exhibition." (Getty, 2017)

Comment: The description for this term is indebted to the Getty Art & Architecture Thesaurus.

URI: http://sparql.cwrc.ca/ontologies/genre#exhibitionCatalogue
Tag: genre:exhibitionCatalogue
prov:wasDerivedFrom: http://vocab.getty.edu/aat/300026096
rdf:type: genre:LiteraryGenre skos:Concept
skos:broaderTransitive: genre:informationalWriting
skos:inScheme: genre:LiteraryGenre

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fable

1- "A brief story illustrating human tendencies through animal characters. Unlike the parables, fables often include talking animals or animated objects as the principal characters. The interaction of these animals or objects reveals general truths about human nature, i.e., a person can learn practical lessons from the fictional antics in a fable. However, unlike a parable, the lesson learned is not necessarily allegorical. Each animal is not necessarily a symbol for something else. Instead, the reader learns the lesson as an exemplum--an example of what one should or should not do. The sixth century (BCE) Greek writer Aesop is most credited as an author of fables, but Phaedrus and Babrius in the first century (CE) expanded on his works to produce the tales we know today. A famous collection of Indian fables was the Sanskrit Bidpai (circa 300 CE), and in the medieval period, Marie de France (c. 1200 CE) composed 102 fables in verse. After the 1600s, fables increasingly became common as a form of children's literature. See also allegory, beast fable, and parable. Click here for a PDF handout discussing the difference between fables and parables." (L. K Wheeler, 2017)

2- "Fictitious narratives usually with animals or inanimate objects as protagonists, intended to convey a hidden meaning regarding human conduct." (Getty, 2017)

Comment: The description for this term is indebted to the Getty Art & Architecture Thesaurus.
The description for this term is indebted to Dr. L. Kip Wheeler of Carson-Newman University.

URI: http://sparql.cwrc.ca/ontologies/genre#fable
Tag: genre:fable
prov:wasDerivedFrom: http://vocab.getty.edu/aat/300055917 http://web.cn.edu/kwheeler/lit_terms_f.html
rdf:type: genre:LiteraryGenre skos:Concept
skos:inScheme: genre:LiteraryGenre

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fabliau

"A humorous, frequently ribald or "dirty" narrative popular with French poets, who traditionally wrote the story in octosyllabic couplets. The tales frequently revolve around trickery, practical jokes, sexual mishaps, scatology, mistaken identity, and bodily humor. Chaucer included several fabliaux in The Canterbury Tales, including the stories of the Shipman, the Friar, the Miller, the Reeve, and the Cook. Examples from French literature include Les Quatre Souhais Saint Martin, Audigier, and Beranger au Long Cul (Beranger of the Long Ass)." (L. K Wheeler, 2017)

Comment: This term and its description were created from data gathered from DBpedia.
The description for this term is indebted to Dr. L. Kip Wheeler of Carson-Newman University.

URI: http://sparql.cwrc.ca/ontologies/genre#fabliau
Tag: genre:fabliau
prov:wasDerivedFrom: dbpedia:Fabliau http://web.cn.edu/kwheeler/lit_terms_f.html
rdf:type: genre:LiteraryGenre skos:Concept
skos:inScheme: genre:LiteraryGenre

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fairytale

1- "Fairytale fantasy is distinguished from other subgenres of fantasy by the works' heavy use of motifs, and often plots, from folklore." (DBpedia, 2017)

2- "Narratives set in the distant past recounting events impossible in the real world, often magical and with fairies, but with humans as heroes and heroines." (Getty, 2017)

Comment: The description for this term is indebted to the Getty Art & Architecture Thesaurus.
The description for this term is indebted to DBpedia.

URI: http://sparql.cwrc.ca/ontologies/genre#fairytale
Tag: genre:fairytale
prov:wasDerivedFrom: dbpedia:Fairytale_fantasy http://vocab.getty.edu/aat/300185684
rdf:type: genre:LiteraryGenre skos:Concept
skos:inScheme: genre:LiteraryGenre
skos:related: genre:childrensLiterature

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fantasy

"Literary genre in which works are of a whimsical or visionary nature, having suppositions that are speculation or resting on no solid grounds." (Getty, 2017)

Comment: The description for this term is indebted to DBpedia.
The description for this term is indebted to the Getty Art & Architecture Thesaurus.

URI: http://sparql.cwrc.ca/ontologies/genre#fantasy
Tag: genre:fantasy
prov:wasDerivedFrom: dbpedia:Fantasy http://vocab.getty.edu/aat/300380290
rdf:type: genre:LiteraryGenre skos:Concept
skos:broaderTransitive: genre:fiction
skos:inScheme: genre:LiteraryGenre
*skos:related: genre:scienceFiction

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farce

"(from Latin Farsus, "stuffed"): A farce is a form of low comedy designed to provoke laughter through highly exaggerated caricatures of people in improbable or silly situations. Traits of farce include (1) physical bustle such as slapstick, (2) sexual misunderstandings and mix-ups, and (3) broad verbal humor such as puns. Many literary critics (especially in the Victorian period) have tended to view farce as inferior to "high comedy" that involves brilliant dialogue. Many of Shakespeare's early works, such as The Taming of the Shrew, are considered farces. Contrast with comedy of manners." (L. K Wheeler, 2017)

Comment: This term and its description were created from data gathered from DBpedia.
The description for this term is indebted to Dr. L. Kip Wheeler of Carson-Newman University.

URI: http://sparql.cwrc.ca/ontologies/genre#farce
Tag: genre:farce
prov:wasDerivedFrom: dbpedia:Farce http://web.cn.edu/kwheeler/lit_terms_f.html
rdf:type: genre:LiteraryGenre skos:Concept
skos:broaderTransitive: genre:comedy
skos:inScheme: genre:LiteraryGenre

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feminist

"Writing concerned with the unique experience of being a woman or alternatively writing designed to challenge existing preconceptions of gender. Examples of feminist writings include Christine de Pisan's medieval work, The City of Ladies; Aemilia Lanyer's Renaissance treatise, Salve Deus, Rex Judaeorum (which presented the then-shocking idea that Adam was just as much to blame for the fall of man as Eve was in the Genesis account); Mary Wollstonecraft's Vindication, and Susan B. Anthony's nineteenth-century essays (which presented the equally shocking idea that women in America and Canada should have the right to vote). Many female students in my class preface their discussions of feminist writings by stating, "I'm not a feminist, but ..." This tendency always puzzled me, since it implies that feminism is something negative, radical, or always liberal. Worse yet, it implies that it's bad for women to want crazy, misguided things like education, equal health insurance, similar pay to what men earn in similar professions, freedom from harassment, and funding for medical problems concerning women, such as breast and uterine cancer research, which are the primary concerns of feminism. Somewhere toward the end of the twentieth-century, detractors of such writers have caricatured these demands as "man-hating" or "anti-family." As an antidote to such thinking, keep in mind the broader definition: a feminist is anyone who thinks that women are people too." (L. K Wheeler, 2017)

Comment: The description for this term is indebted to Dr. L. Kip Wheeler of Carson-Newman University.

URI: http://sparql.cwrc.ca/ontologies/genre#feminist
Tag: genre:feminist
prov:wasDerivedFrom: http://web.cn.edu/kwheeler/lit_terms_f.html
rdf:type: genre:LiteraryGenre skos:Concept
skos:broaderTransitive: genre:politicalWriting
skos:inScheme: genre:LiteraryGenre
skos:narrowerTransitive: genre:feministTheory

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feminist theory

"Feminist theory is the extension of feminism into theoretical, fictional, or philosophical discourse. It aims to understand the nature of gender inequality. It examines women's and men's social roles, experience, interests, chores, and feminist politics in a variety of fields, such as anthropology and sociology, communication, psychoanalysis, home economics, literature, education, and philosophy." (DBpedia, 2017)

Comment: This term and its description were created from data gathered from DBpedia.

URI: http://sparql.cwrc.ca/ontologies/genre#feministTheory
Tag: genre:feministTheory
prov:wasDerivedFrom: dbpedia:Feminist_theory
rdf:type: genre:LiteraryGenre skos:Concept
skos:broaderTransitive: genre:feminist genre:philosophical genre:scholarship
skos:inScheme: genre:LiteraryGenre

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fiction

"Genre that refers to works evoked from the imagination of the writer and not conferred as fact. In literature, fiction generally refers to the novel, novella, short story, and poetic forms." (Getty, 2017)

Comment: The description for this term is indebted to the Getty Art & Architecture Thesaurus.

URI: http://sparql.cwrc.ca/ontologies/genre#fiction
Tag: genre:fiction
prov:wasDerivedFrom: http://vocab.getty.edu/aat/300055918
rdf:type: genre:LiteraryGenre skos:Concept
skos:inScheme: genre:LiteraryGenre
skos:narrowerTransitive: genre:adventureWriting genre:bisexualFiction genre:courtshipFiction genre:dystopia genre:fantasy genre:ghostStory genre:magicRealist genre:mystery genre:novel genre:picaresque genre:realist genre:schoolFiction genre:scienceFiction genre:shortStory genre:thriller genre:utopia genre:verseNovel

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film tv script

"Written texts of stage plays, screenplays, and radio or television broadcasts." (Getty, 2017)

Comment: This term and its description were created from data gathered from the Getty Art & Architecture Thesaurus.

[skos:altLabel: films script ]

URI: http://sparql.cwrc.ca/ontologies/genre#filmTvScript
Tag: genre:filmTvScript
prov:wasDerivedFrom: http://vocab.getty.edu/aat/300026487
rdf:type: genre:LiteraryGenre skos:Concept
skos:inScheme: genre:LiteraryGenre

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folk song

"A song recorded or transcribed after being preserved for generations by a particular culture through an oral tradition, or more recent songs composed in the style of that tradition." (Oxford, 2015)

Comment: This term and its description were created from data gathered from the Oxford Dictionary of Literary Terms, 4th ed.

URI: http://sparql.cwrc.ca/ontologies/genre#folkSong
Tag: genre:folkSong
prov:wasDerivedFrom: http://www.oxfordreference.com/view/10.1093/acref/9780199208272.001.0001/acref-9780199208272-e-470?rskey=icg8D9%26result=461
rdf:type: genre:LiteraryGenre skos:Concept
skos:broaderTransitive: genre:song
skos:inScheme: genre:LiteraryGenre

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gardening

A text, typically non-fiction, dealing with the subject of gardening.

[skos:altLabel: GARDENINGBOOK ]

URI: http://sparql.cwrc.ca/ontologies/genre#gardeningBook
Tag: genre:gardeningBook
rdf:type: genre:LiteraryGenre skos:Concept
skos:broaderTransitive: genre:informationalWriting
skos:inScheme: genre:LiteraryGenre

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genealogy

"Accounts or histories of the descent of persons, families, or other groups, from an ancestor or ancestors; enumerations of ancestors and their descendants in the natural order of succession." (Getty, 2017)

Comment: This term and its description were created from data gathered from DBpedia.
The description for this term is indebted to the Getty Art & Architecture Thesaurus.

URI: http://sparql.cwrc.ca/ontologies/genre#genealogy
Tag: genre:genealogy
prov:wasDerivedFrom: dbpedia:Genealogy http://vocab.getty.edu/aat/300027015
rdf:type: genre:LiteraryGenre skos:Concept
skos:inScheme: genre:LiteraryGenre

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georgic

"Poetry about rural life that gives practical advice on the subject of agriculture. Unlike pastoral poetry, it does not portray the countryside as an idyllic escape, but rather focuses on the necessity of outdoor labour." (Oxford, 2015)

Comment: This term and its description were created from data gathered from the Oxford Dictionary of Literary Terms, 4th ed.

URI: http://sparql.cwrc.ca/ontologies/genre#georgic
Tag: genre:georgic
prov:wasDerivedFrom: http://www.oxfordreference.com/view/10.1093/acref/9780199208272.001.0001/acref-9780199208272-e-496?rskey=qEr6Vu%26result=491
rdf:type: genre:LiteraryGenre skos:Concept
skos:broaderTransitive: genre:poetry
skos:inScheme: genre:LiteraryGenre

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ghost story

"Prose tales of the supernatural in which the living encounter manifestations of the spirits of the dead." (Getty, 2017)

Comment: The description for this term is indebted to the Getty Art & Architecture Thesaurus.
The description for this term is indebted to DBpedia.

URI: http://sparql.cwrc.ca/ontologies/genre#ghostStory
Tag: genre:ghostStory
prov:wasDerivedFrom: dbpedia:Ghost_story http://vocab.getty.edu/aat/300254823
rdf:type: genre:LiteraryGenre skos:Concept
skos:broaderTransitive: genre:fiction
skos:inScheme: genre:LiteraryGenre

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giftbook

"Books, usually illustrated literary anthologies, intended to be given as gifts and often published annually; popular in the 19th century. For works produced to mark an occasion, use "keepsakes (books)." (Getty, 2017)

Comment: The description for this term is indebted to the Getty Art & Architecture Thesaurus.

URI: http://sparql.cwrc.ca/ontologies/genre#giftbook
Tag: genre:giftbook
prov:wasDerivedFrom: http://vocab.getty.edu/aat/300202541
rdf:type: genre:LiteraryGenre skos:Concept
skos:inScheme: genre:LiteraryGenre

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gothic

"Romantic fictions having a prevailing atmosphere of mystery and terror, often combined with a love story. The genre was introduced in England ca. 1765, but soon became popular elsewhere in Europe, reaching its heyday in the 1790s. The genre has undergone frequent revivals in subsequent centuries. It is called "Gothic" because the early examples were often set in part among medieval buildings and ruins, such as castles or monasteries." (Getty, 2017)

Comment: The description for this term is indebted to the Getty Art & Architecture Thesaurus.

URI: http://sparql.cwrc.ca/ontologies/genre#gothic
Tag: genre:gothic
prov:wasDerivedFrom: http://vocab.getty.edu/aat/300266777
rdf:type: genre:LiteraryGenre skos:Concept
skos:broaderTransitive: genre:thematicWriting
skos:inScheme: genre:LiteraryGenre

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government report

An official government publication covering any of a wide variety of subjects.

[skos:altLabel: governmental report ]

URI: http://sparql.cwrc.ca/ontologies/genre#governmentReport
Tag: genre:governmentReport
rdf:type: genre:LiteraryGenre skos:Concept
skos:broaderTransitive: genre:informationalWriting
skos:inScheme: genre:LiteraryGenre

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grammar

"GRAMMAR: Another term for transformational grammar." (L. K Wheeler, 2017)

Comment: This term and its description were created from data gathered from DBpedia.
The description for this term is indebted to Dr. L. Kip Wheeler of Carson-Newman University.

URI: http://sparql.cwrc.ca/ontologies/genre#grammar
Tag: genre:grammar
prov:wasDerivedFrom: dbpedia:Grammar http://web.cn.edu/kwheeler/lit_terms_g.html
rdf:type: genre:LiteraryGenre skos:Concept
skos:broaderTransitive: genre:pedagogy
skos:inScheme: genre:LiteraryGenre

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graveyard poetry

"An 18th-century poetic form dealing with the subjects of death and immortality. The name originates from the setting typical of these poems: the graveyard." (Oxford, 2015)

Comment: This term and its description were created from data gathered from the Oxford Dictionary of Literary Terms, 4th ed.

URI: http://sparql.cwrc.ca/ontologies/genre#graveyardPoetry
Tag: genre:graveyardPoetry
prov:wasDerivedFrom: http://www.oxfordreference.com/view/10.1093/acref/9780199208272.001.0001/acref-9780199208272-e-511?rskey=ejri5r%26result=511
rdf:type: genre:LiteraryGenre skos:Concept
skos:broaderTransitive: genre:poetry
skos:inScheme: genre:LiteraryGenre

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guidebook

"Handbooks for the guidance of strangers or visitors in a district, town, building, etc., giving a description of the roads, places, or objects of interest to be found there." (Getty, 2017)

Comment: The description for this term is indebted to the Getty Art & Architecture Thesaurus.

URI: http://sparql.cwrc.ca/ontologies/genre#guidebook
Tag: genre:guidebook
prov:wasDerivedFrom: http://vocab.getty.edu/aat/300026300
rdf:type: genre:LiteraryGenre skos:Concept
skos:broaderTransitive: genre:informationalWriting
skos:inScheme: genre:LiteraryGenre

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hagiography

1- Biographies of saints, usually written, but includes oral or visual works as well.

2- "Saints' lives as a branch of literature or legend." (Getty, 2017)

Comment: The description for this term is indebted to the Getty Art & Architecture Thesaurus.
The description for this term is indebted to DBpedia.

URI: http://sparql.cwrc.ca/ontologies/genre#hagiography
Tag: genre:hagiography
prov:wasDerivedFrom: dbpedia:Hagiography http://vocab.getty.edu/aat/300055909 http://vocab.getty.edu/aat/300201063
rdf:type: genre:LiteraryGenre skos:Concept
skos:broaderTransitive: genre:religious
skos:inScheme: genre:LiteraryGenre

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haiku

"(plural: haiku, from archaic Japanese): The term haiku is a fairly late addition to Japanese poetry. The poet Shiki coined the term in the nineteenth century from a longer, more traditional phrase, haikai renga no hokku ("the introductory lines of light linked verse"). To understand the haiku's history as a genre, peruse the vocabulary entries for its predecessors, the hokku and the haikai renga or renku. The haiku follows several conventions: Many Japanese poets have used the form, the two acknowledged masters being Bashó (a nom de plume for Matsuo Munefusa, 1644-94); and Kobayashi Issa (a nom de plume for Kobayashi Nobuyuki). The Imagist Movement in 20th century English literature has been profoundly influenced by haiku. The list of poets who attempted the haiku or admired the genre includes Ezra Pound, Amy Lowell, Robert Frost, Conrad Aiken, and W. B. Yeats. Contrast haiku with the tanka and the senryu. See also hokku, below, and haikai, above. See also kigo and imagism. You can click here to download a PDF handout summarizing this discussion of haiku, or you can click here to download PDF samples of haiku." (L. K Wheeler, 2017)

Comment: This term and its description were created from data gathered from DBpedia.
The description for this term is indebted to Dr. L. Kip Wheeler of Carson-Newman University.

URI: http://sparql.cwrc.ca/ontologies/genre#haiku
Tag: genre:haiku
prov:wasDerivedFrom: dbpedia:Haiku http://web.cn.edu/kwheeler/lit_terms_h.html
rdf:type: genre:LiteraryGenre skos:Concept
skos:broaderTransitive: genre:poetry
skos:inScheme: genre:LiteraryGenre

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harlequinade

"Books popular in the 18th and 19th centuries, originally often depicting harlequins, in which folded parts of pages are lifted to reveal new pictures, fitted neatly onto the remaining parts of the previous pictures." (Getty, 2017)

Comment: This term and its description were created from data gathered from the Getty Art & Architecture Thesaurus.

URI: http://sparql.cwrc.ca/ontologies/genre#harlequinade
Tag: genre:harlequinade
prov:wasDerivedFrom: http://vocab.getty.edu/aat/300212205
rdf:type: genre:LiteraryGenre skos:Concept
skos:inScheme: genre:LiteraryGenre

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heroic

"Form of poetry comprising long narratives celebrating on a grand scale the adventures and deeds of one or more heroic figures, ordinarily concerning a serious subject significant to a culture or nation. Classical epic poetry employs dactylic hexameter and recounts a journey." (Getty, 2017)

Comment: The description for this term is indebted to the Getty Art & Architecture Thesaurus.

URI: http://sparql.cwrc.ca/ontologies/genre#heroic
Tag: genre:heroic
prov:wasDerivedFrom: http://vocab.getty.edu/aat/300404208
rdf:type: genre:LiteraryGenre skos:Concept
skos:broaderTransitive: genre:poetry
skos:inScheme: genre:LiteraryGenre

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historical writing

"Refers to maps that indicate political administrative boundaries or other characteristics of a region at periods of time before the present. They typically include historical names for places, historical population dispositions, and the historical state of physical features." (Getty, 2017)

Comment: This term and its description were created from data gathered from DBpedia.
The description for this term is indebted to the Getty Art & Architecture Thesaurus.

URI: http://sparql.cwrc.ca/ontologies/genre#historical
Tag: genre:historical
prov:wasDerivedFrom: dbpedia:Historical_fiction http://vocab.getty.edu/aat/300028233
rdf:type: genre:LiteraryGenre skos:Concept
skos:inScheme: genre:LiteraryGenre
skos:narrowerTransitive: genre:history genre:nationalTale

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history

"Chronological records of significant events, as of the life or development of a people, country, or institution, often with an explanation of the causes." (Getty, 2017)

Comment: The description for this term is indebted to the Getty Art & Architecture Thesaurus.

[skos:altLabel: historical overview ]

URI: http://sparql.cwrc.ca/ontologies/genre#history
Tag: genre:history
prov:wasDerivedFrom: http://vocab.getty.edu/aat/300026358
rdf:type: genre:LiteraryGenre skos:Concept
skos:broaderTransitive: genre:historical
skos:inScheme: genre:LiteraryGenre

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hymn

"A religious song consisting of one or more repeating rhythmical stanzas. In classical Roman literature, hymns to Minerva and Jupiter survive. The Greek poet Sappho wrote a number of hymns to Aphrodite. More recently a vast number of hymns appear in Catholic and Protestant religious lyrics. A particularly vibrant tradition of hymn-writing comes from the South's African-American population during the nineteenth century. In the realm of fiction, C.S. Lewis creates hymns for the Solid Ones in The Great Divorce, and Tolkien creates Elvish hymns such as "O Elbereth" in The Lord of the Rings, typically with quatrain structure alternating with couplet stanzas. In the example of "O Elbereth," the hymn honors one of the Maiar spirits. See also paean." (L. K Wheeler, 2017)

Comment: The description for this term is indebted to Dr. L. Kip Wheeler of Carson-Newman University.

URI: http://sparql.cwrc.ca/ontologies/genre#hymn
Tag: genre:hymn
prov:wasDerivedFrom: http://web.cn.edu/kwheeler/lit_terms_h.html
rdf:type: genre:LiteraryGenre skos:Concept
skos:broaderTransitive: genre:musicalWriting genre:poetry genre:religious
skos:inScheme: genre:LiteraryGenre

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imitation

"A form of intertextuality in which a writer intentionally adopts the style of another writer or borrows important elements of someone else's work." (Penguin, 1999)

Comment: This term and its description were created from data gathered from the Penguin Dictionary of Literary Terms & Literary Theory, 4th ed.

URI: http://sparql.cwrc.ca/ontologies/genre#imitation
Tag: genre:imitation
prov:wasDerivedFrom: https://www.politicalavenue.com/10862/ENGLISH-LANGUAGE-BOOKS/English%20-%20Penguin%20Dictionary%20Of%20Literary%20Terms%20And%20Literary%20Theory.pdf
rdf:type: genre:LiteraryGenre skos:Concept
skos:inScheme: genre:LiteraryGenre

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industrial novel

"A novel that exposes the living or working conditions of the 19th century-working class as a result of the industrial revolution. The shocking circumstances—extreme poverty, deplorable factory conditions, widespread disease, over-crowded housing, etc.—are typically described in great detail. Solutions are often proposed, but the main goal of an industrial novel is to make the plight of the lower class known to the middle and upper classes in order to promote social change." (Penguin, 1999)

Comment: This term and its description were created from data gathered from DBpedia.
This term and its description were created from data gathered from the Penguin Dictionary of Literary Terms & Literary Theory, 4th ed.

URI: http://sparql.cwrc.ca/ontologies/genre#industrialNovel
Tag: genre:industrialNovel
prov:wasDerivedFrom: dbpedia:Industrial_novel https://www.politicalavenue.com/10862/ENGLISH-LANGUAGE-BOOKS/English%20-%20Penguin%20Dictionary%20Of%20Literary%20Terms%20And%20Literary%20Theory.pdf
rdf:type: genre:LiteraryGenre skos:Concept
skos:broaderTransitive: genre:novel genre:thematicWriting
skos:inScheme: genre:LiteraryGenre

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informational writing

A broad category of writing, often considered nonfictional, designed to convey specific content on a wide range of topics. That content may not be true, and informational texts like other forms of writing are vehicles for persuasion and ideology. Informational writing may possess literary qualities and may or may not be scholarly.

URI: http://sparql.cwrc.ca/ontologies/genre#informationalWriting
Tag: genre:informationalWriting
prov:wasDerivedFrom: https://www.politicalavenue.com/10862/ENGLISH-LANGUAGE-BOOKS/English%20-%20Penguin%20Dictionary%20Of%20Literary%20Terms%20And%20Literary%20Theory.pdf
rdf:type: genre:LiteraryGenre skos:Concept
skos:inScheme: genre:LiteraryGenre
skos:narrowerTransitive: genre:cookbook genre:documentary genre:exhibitionCatalogue genre:gardeningBook genre:governmentReport genre:guidebook genre:manual genre:review genre:scholarship genre:travelWriting

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introduction

"The opening section of a text, often in the form of an essay, that usually provides an overview of the text's subject matter and explains the author's reason for writing." (Penguin, 1999)

Comment: This term and its description were created from data gathered from the Penguin Dictionary of Literary Terms & Literary Theory, 4th ed.

URI: http://sparql.cwrc.ca/ontologies/genre#introduction
Tag: genre:introduction
prov:wasDerivedFrom: https://www.politicalavenue.com/10862/ENGLISH-LANGUAGE-BOOKS/English%20-%20Penguin%20Dictionary%20Of%20Literary%20Terms%20And%20Literary%20Theory.pdf
rdf:type: genre:LiteraryGenre skos:Concept
skos:broaderTransitive: genre:paratext
skos:inScheme: genre:LiteraryGenre

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journalism

"Content prepared for a newspaper, magazine, news website, or other form of news media, typically with the purpose of recording facts about a person or event." (Merriam-Webster, 2017)

Comment: This term and its description were created from data gathered from the Merriam-Webster dictionary.
This term and its description were created from data gathered from DBpedia.

URI: http://sparql.cwrc.ca/ontologies/genre#journalism
Tag: genre:journalism
prov:wasDerivedFrom: dbpedia:Journalism https://www.merriam-webster.com/dictionary/journalism
rdf:type: genre:LiteraryGenre skos:Concept
skos:inScheme: genre:LiteraryGenre
skos:narrowerTransitive: genre:revue

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juvenilia

"Literary or artistic works produced by persons in their childhood or youth; usually used to set those works apart from later, mature works." (Getty, 2017)

Comment: The description for this term is indebted to the Getty Art & Architecture Thesaurus.

URI: http://sparql.cwrc.ca/ontologies/genre#juvenilia
Tag: genre:juvenilia
prov:wasDerivedFrom: http://vocab.getty.edu/aat/300028883
rdf:type: genre:LiteraryGenre skos:Concept
skos:inScheme: genre:LiteraryGenre

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kitchen sink drama

"Originating in Britain in the 1950s, realistic drama centred on the domestic lives of working-class characters." (Oxford, 2015)

Comment: This term and its description were created from data gathered from the Oxford Dictionary of Literary Terms, 4th ed.

URI: http://sparql.cwrc.ca/ontologies/genre#kitchenSinkDrama
Tag: genre:kitchenSinkDrama
prov:wasDerivedFrom: http://www.oxfordreference.com/view/10.1093/acref/9780199208272.001.0001/acref-9780199208272-e-629?rskey=HtykbC%26result=621
rdf:type: genre:LiteraryGenre skos:Concept
skos:broaderTransitive: genre:drama
skos:inScheme: genre:LiteraryGenre

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kunstlerroman

"German for “artist-novel.” A novel in which an artist is the main character, often following the development of his or her life and artistic growth, as in a bildungsroman." (Oxford, 2015)

Comment: This term and its description were created from data gathered from the Oxford Dictionary of Literary Terms, 4th ed.

URI: http://sparql.cwrc.ca/ontologies/genre#kunstlerroman
Tag: genre:kunstlerroman
prov:wasDerivedFrom: http://www.oxfordreference.com/view/10.1093/acref/9780199208272.001.0001/acref-9780199208272-e-632?rskey=HtykbC%26result=624
rdf:type: genre:LiteraryGenre skos:Concept
skos:broaderTransitive: genre:bildungsroman
skos:inScheme: genre:LiteraryGenre

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lais

"A laisse is a type of stanza, of varying length, found in medieval French literature, specifically medieval French epic poetry (the chanson de geste), such as The Song of Roland. In early works, each laisse was made up of (mono) assonanced verses, although the appearance of (mono) rhymed laisses was increasingly common in later poems. Within a poem, the length of each separate laisse is variable (whereas the metric length of the verses is invariable, each verse having the same syllable length, typically decasyllables or, occasionally, alexandrines. The laisse is characterized by stereotyped phrases and formulas and frequently repeated themes and motifs, including repetitions of material from one laisse to another. Such repetitions and formulaic structures are common of orality and oral-formulaic composition. When medieval poets repeated content (with different wording or assonance/rhyme) from one laisse to another, such "similar" laisses are called laisses similaires in French." (DBpedia, 2017)

Comment: The description for this term is indebted to DBpedia.
This term and its description were created from data gathered from DBpedia.

URI: http://sparql.cwrc.ca/ontologies/genre#lais
Tag: genre:lais
prov:wasDerivedFrom: dbpedia:Lai dbpedia:Laisse
rdf:type: genre:LiteraryGenre skos:Concept
skos:broaderTransitive: genre:poetry
skos:inScheme: genre:LiteraryGenre

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lampoon

"A coarse or crude satire ridiculing the appearance or character of another person." (L. K Wheeler, 2017)

Comment: This term and its description were created from data gathered from DBpedia.
The description for this term is indebted to Dr. L. Kip Wheeler of Carson-Newman University.

URI: http://sparql.cwrc.ca/ontologies/genre#lampoon
Tag: genre:lampoon
prov:wasDerivedFrom: dbpedia:Libelle_(literary_genre) http://web.cn.edu/kwheeler/lit_terms_l.html
rdf:type: genre:LiteraryGenre skos:Concept
skos:broaderTransitive: genre:satire
skos:inScheme: genre:LiteraryGenre

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legal writing

"Legal writing is a type of technical writing used by lawyers, judges, legislators, and others in law to express legal analysis and legal rights and duties. Legal writing in practice is used to advocate for or to express the resolution of a client's legal matter." (DBpedia, 2017)

Comment: This term and its description were created from data gathered from DBpedia.

[skos:altLabel: legal ]

URI: http://sparql.cwrc.ca/ontologies/genre#legalWriting
Tag: genre:legalWriting
prov:wasDerivedFrom: dbpedia:Legal_writing
rdf:type: genre:LiteraryGenre skos:Concept
skos:broaderTransitive: genre:scholarship
skos:inScheme: genre:LiteraryGenre

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legend folktale

"Stories that have been maintained over time, usually by a particular culture through an oral tradition. Often understood within originating cultures as historical accounts although they differ from Western record-keeping." (Getty, 2017)

Comment: This term and its description were created from data gathered from the Getty Art & Architecture Thesaurus.

[skos:altLabel: legend ]

URI: http://sparql.cwrc.ca/ontologies/genre#legendFolktale
Tag: genre:legendFolktale
prov:wasDerivedFrom: http://vocab.getty.edu/aat/300055922 http://vocab.getty.edu/aat/300055923
rdf:type: genre:LiteraryGenre skos:Concept
skos:inScheme: genre:LiteraryGenre

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lesbian writing

Lesbian literature is a subgenre of literature addressing lesbian themes. It includes poetry, plays, fiction addressing lesbian characters, and non-fiction about lesbian-interest topics.

Comment: The description for this term is indebted to DBpedia.

URI: http://sparql.cwrc.ca/ontologies/genre#lesbian
Tag: genre:lesbian
prov:wasDerivedFrom: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Lesbian_literature
rdf:type: genre:LiteraryGenre skos:Concept
skos:broaderTransitive: genre:lgbtq genre:thematicWriting
skos:inScheme: genre:LiteraryGenre

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letter

"Pieces of correspondence that are somewhat more formal than memoranda or notes, usually on paper and delivered." (Getty, 2017)

Comment: This term and its description were created from data gathered from the Getty Art & Architecture Thesaurus.
The description for this term is indebted to the Getty Art & Architecture Thesaurus.

URI: http://sparql.cwrc.ca/ontologies/genre#letter
Tag: genre:letter
prov:wasDerivedFrom: http://vocab.getty.edu/aat/300026879 http://vocab.getty.edu/aat/300343729
rdf:type: genre:LiteraryGenre skos:Concept
skos:broaderTransitive: genre:epistolary
skos:inScheme: genre:LiteraryGenre

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letters from the dead to the living

Moralised case-histories in the form of letters in which the dead strive to reclaim the living beloved by persuading them to repent and reform. Often include features of lively fiction: character-drawing, narrative, suspense, surprise, humour, and love-situations including transgression of all kinds.

URI: http://sparql.cwrc.ca/ontologies/genre#lettersfromthedeadtotheliving
Tag: genre:lettersfromthedeadtotheliving
rdf:type: genre:LiteraryGenre skos:Concept
skos:broaderTransitive: genre:epistolary
skos:inScheme: genre:LiteraryGenre

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LGBTQ

"LGBT, or GLBT, is an initialism that stands for lesbian, gay, bisexual, and transgender. In use since the 1990s, the term is an adaptation of the initialism LGB, which was used to replace the term gay in reference to the LGBT community beginning in the mid-to-late 1980s. Activists believed that the term gay community did not accurately represent all those to whom it referred. Whether or not LGBT people openly identify themselves may depend on local political concerns and whether they live in a discriminatory environment, as well as on the status of LGBT rights where they live." (DBpedia, 2017)

Comment: This term and its description were created from data gathered from DBpedia.

URI: http://sparql.cwrc.ca/ontologies/genre#lgbtq
Tag: genre:lgbtq
prov:wasDerivedFrom: http://dbpedia.org/page/LGBT
rdf:type: genre:LiteraryGenre skos:Concept
skos:inScheme: genre:LiteraryGenre
skos:narrowerTransitive: genre:lesbian

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libretto

"Books or booklets containing the text or words of an opera or similar extended musical composition." (Getty, 2017)

Comment: This term and its description were created from data gathered from DBpedia.
The description for this term is indebted to the Getty Art & Architecture Thesaurus.

URI: http://sparql.cwrc.ca/ontologies/genre#libretto
Tag: genre:libretto
prov:wasDerivedFrom: dbpedia:Libretto http://vocab.getty.edu/aat/300026424
rdf:type: genre:LiteraryGenre skos:Concept
skos:broaderTransitive: genre:opera
skos:inScheme: genre:LiteraryGenre

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life writing

"Life writing is the recording of memories, and experiences, whether one's own or another's. This applies to many genres and practices, under which can be found autobiography, biography, memoir, diaries, letters, testimonies, personal essays and, more recently, digital forms such as blogs and email." (DBpedia, 2017)

Comment: The description for this term is indebted to DBpedia.

URI: http://sparql.cwrc.ca/ontologies/genre#lifeWriting
Tag: genre:lifeWriting
prov:wasDerivedFrom: dbpedia:Life_writing
rdf:type: genre:LiteraryGenre skos:Concept
skos:inScheme: genre:LiteraryGenre

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literary criticism

Writing that analyzes or critiques a literary work, often through the use of a particular literary theory, and typically in the form of an essay.

Comment: This term and its description were created from data gathered from DBpedia.

URI: http://sparql.cwrc.ca/ontologies/genre#literaryCriticism
Tag: genre:literaryCriticism
prov:wasDerivedFrom: dbpedia:Literary_criticism
rdf:type: genre:LiteraryGenre skos:Concept
skos:broaderTransitive: genre:scholarship
skos:inScheme: genre:LiteraryGenre

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liturgy

"Writing, typically in the form of a prayer or a song, to be used by a particular religious community for the purpose of worship." (Getty, 2017)

Comment: This term and its description were created from data gathered from DBpedia.
This term and its description were created from data gathered from the Getty Art & Architecture Thesaurus.

URI: http://sparql.cwrc.ca/ontologies/genre#liturgy
Tag: genre:liturgy
prov:wasDerivedFrom: dbpedia:Liturgy http://vocab.getty.edu/aat/300055983
rdf:type: genre:LiteraryGenre skos:Concept
skos:broaderTransitive: genre:religious
skos:inScheme: genre:LiteraryGenre

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love

Generic modifier for a representation that deals primarily with the subject of love.

Comment: The description for this term is indebted to DBpedia.

URI: http://sparql.cwrc.ca/ontologies/genre#love
Tag: genre:love
prov:wasDerivedFrom: dbpedia:Christo
rdf:type: genre:LiteraryGenre skos:Concept
skos:inScheme: genre:LiteraryGenre

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lyric

"Lyric Essay is a subgenre of essay writing, which combines qualities of poetry, essay, memoir, and research writing. The lyric essay is considered high art, and often requires work and association on behalf of the reader. Proponents of the lyric essay classification insist it differs from prose poetry in its reliance on association rather than line breaks and juxtaposition." (DBpedia, 2017)

Comment: This term and its description were created from data gathered from Encyclopaedia Universalis.
The description for this term is indebted to DBpedia.

URI: http://sparql.cwrc.ca/ontologies/genre#lyric
Tag: genre:lyric
prov:wasDerivedFrom: dbpedia:Lyric_essay http://www.universalis.fr/encyclopedie/lyrisme/
rdf:type: genre:LiteraryGenre skos:Concept
skos:broaderTransitive: genre:poetry
skos:inScheme: genre:LiteraryGenre

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magic realist

"A style of fiction popularized in Latin-American writing from the mid-twentieth century, in which magical or fantastical elements are not treated as unusual, but rather occur alongside realistic elements as a natural part of the narrative." (Encyclopædia Britannica, 2017)

Comment: This term and its description were created from data gathered from the Encyclopædia Britannica.
This term and its description were created from data gathered from DBpedia.

URI: http://sparql.cwrc.ca/ontologies/genre#magicRealist
Tag: genre:magicRealist
prov:wasDerivedFrom: dbpedia:Magic_realism https://www.britannica.com/art/magic-realism
rdf:type: genre:LiteraryGenre skos:Concept
skos:broaderTransitive: genre:fiction
skos:inScheme: genre:LiteraryGenre

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manifesto

"Formal written declarations, promulgated by a sovereign or by the executive authority of a state or nation, such as to proclaim its reasons and motives for declaring a war, or other international action; also public declarations or proclamations of political, social, artistic, or other principles." (Getty, 2017)

Comment: The description for this term is indebted to the Getty Art & Architecture Thesaurus.
This term and its description were created from data gathered from DBpedia.

URI: http://sparql.cwrc.ca/ontologies/genre#manifesto
Tag: genre:manifesto
prov:wasDerivedFrom: dbpedia:Manifesto http://vocab.getty.edu/aat/300026393
rdf:type: genre:LiteraryGenre skos:Concept
skos:broaderTransitive: genre:politicalWriting
skos:inScheme: genre:LiteraryGenre

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manual

"Books or treatises, often compendious, containing rules or instructions needed to perform tasks, operations, processes, occupations, arts, or studies, and intended to be used as reference while the task or study is performed." (Getty, 2017)

Comment: The description for this term is indebted to the Getty Art & Architecture Thesaurus.

URI: http://sparql.cwrc.ca/ontologies/genre#manual
Tag: genre:manual
prov:wasDerivedFrom: http://vocab.getty.edu/aat/300026395
rdf:type: genre:LiteraryGenre skos:Concept
skos:broaderTransitive: genre:informationalWriting
skos:inScheme: genre:LiteraryGenre

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map

"Refers to graphic or photogrammetric representations of the Earth's surface or a part of it, including physical features and political boundaries, where each point corresponds to a geographical or celestial position according to a definite scale or projection. The term may also refer to similar depictions of other planets, suns, other heavenly bodies, or areas of the heavens. Maps are typically depicted on a flat medium, such as on paper, a wall, or a computer screen." (Getty, 2017)

Comment: This term and its description were created from data gathered from the Getty Art & Architecture Thesaurus.

URI: http://sparql.cwrc.ca/ontologies/genre#map
Tag: genre:map
prov:wasDerivedFrom: http://vocab.getty.edu/aat/300028094
rdf:type: genre:LiteraryGenre skos:Concept
skos:inScheme: genre:LiteraryGenre

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masque

"Not to be confused with a masquerade, a masque is a type of elaborate court entertainment popular in the times of Queen Elizabeth I, King James I, and Charles I--i.e., the early 17th Century after Queen Elizabeth's death. The masque as a performance grew out of medieval plays, but it was more spectacle than drama proper. The content was suitable for amateur actors rather than professional performers. The masques tended to use long speeches and little action. They combined poetic drama, singing, dancing, music, and splendid costumes and settings. The imagery was influential on later poets and poems, such as Andrew Marvell, who makes use of masque-imagery in "Upon Appleton House." (L. K Wheeler, 2017)

Comment: The description for this term is indebted to Dr. L. Kip Wheeler of Carson-Newman University.
This term and its description were created from data gathered from DBpedia.

URI: http://sparql.cwrc.ca/ontologies/genre#masque
Tag: genre:masque
prov:wasDerivedFrom: dbpedia:Masque http://web.cn.edu/kwheeler/lit_terms_m.html
rdf:type: genre:LiteraryGenre skos:Concept
skos:inScheme: genre:LiteraryGenre

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medical writing

Writing, typically of a scientific nature, relating to the field of medicine.

URI: http://sparql.cwrc.ca/ontologies/genre#medicalWriting
Tag: genre:medicalWriting
rdf:type: genre:LiteraryGenre skos:Concept
skos:broaderTransitive: genre:scholarship
skos:inScheme: genre:LiteraryGenre

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melodrama

"A dramatic form characterized by excessive sentiment, exaggerated emotion, sensational and thrilling action, and an artificially happy ending. Melodramas originally referred to romantic plays featuring music, singing, and dancing, but by the eighteenth century they connoted simplified and coincidental plots, bathos, and happy endings. These melodramatic traits are present in Gothic novels, western stories, popular films, and television crime shows, to name but a few more recent examples." (L. K Wheeler, 2017)

Comment: The description for this term is indebted to Dr. L. Kip Wheeler of Carson-Newman University.

URI: http://sparql.cwrc.ca/ontologies/genre#melodrama
Tag: genre:melodrama
prov:wasDerivedFrom: dbpedia:Melodrama http://web.cn.edu/kwheeler/lit_terms_m.html
rdf:type: genre:LiteraryGenre skos:Concept
skos:broaderTransitive: genre:drama
skos:inScheme: genre:LiteraryGenre

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mixed media

"Visual works created using multiple media." (Getty, 2017)

Comment: This term and its description were created from data gathered from the Getty Art & Architecture Thesaurus.

URI: http://sparql.cwrc.ca/ontologies/genre#mixedMedia
Tag: genre:mixedMedia
prov:wasDerivedFrom: http://vocab.getty.edu/aat/300404586
rdf:type: genre:LiteraryGenre skos:Concept
skos:inScheme: genre:LiteraryGenre

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mock forms

Writing that uses the conventions of a specific genre satirically in order to mock or parody that genre.

URI: http://sparql.cwrc.ca/ontologies/genre#mockForms
Tag: genre:mockForms
rdf:type: genre:LiteraryGenre skos:Concept
skos:broaderTransitive: genre:satire
skos:inScheme: genre:LiteraryGenre

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monologue

"In theatre, a monologue (from Greek μονόλογος from μόνος mónos, "alone, solitary" and λόγος lógos, "speech") is a speech presented by a single character, most often to express their mental thoughts aloud, though sometimes also to directly address another character or the audience. Monologues are common across the range of dramatic media (plays, films, etc.), as well as in non-dramatic media such as poetry. Monologues share much in common with several other literary devices including soliloquies, apostrophes, and aside. There are, however, distinctions between each of these devices." (DBpedia, 2017)

Comment: The description for this term is indebted to DBpedia.

URI: http://sparql.cwrc.ca/ontologies/genre#monologue
Tag: genre:monologue
prov:wasDerivedFrom: dbpedia:Monologue
rdf:type: genre:LiteraryGenre skos:Concept
skos:broaderTransitive: genre:drama
skos:inScheme: genre:LiteraryGenre

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morality or mystery play

"Religious dramas or pageants, typically written anonymously, that were popular in medieval Europe. Mystery plays represent one or more scenes from the Bible, and were first performed in the 13th century, often using a wagon as a stage to allow a performance to take place in various locations, . Morality plays were first popularized in the 15th century, and are allegorical rather than directly representational works in which personified vices and virtues compete to win a human soul for eternity." (Oxford, 2015)

Comment: This term and its description were created from data gathered from the Oxford Dictionary of Literary Terms, 4th ed.

[skos:altLabel: morality play ]

URI: http://sparql.cwrc.ca/ontologies/genre#moralityOrMysteryPlay
Tag: genre:moralityOrMysteryPlay
prov:wasDerivedFrom: http://www.oxfordreference.com/view/10.1093/acref/9780199208272.001.0001/acref-9780199208272-e-745?rskey=1MnHpb%26result=741 http://www.oxfordreference.com/view/10.1093/acref/9780199208272.001.0001/acref-9780199208272-e-753?rskey=XphoRT%26result=751
rdf:type: genre:LiteraryGenre skos:Concept
skos:broaderTransitive: genre:drama
skos:inScheme: genre:LiteraryGenre

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multimedia

"Contemporary works of art that employ several distinct art forms, such as sculpture and music or painting and light art." (Getty, 2017)

Comment: This term and its description were created from data gathered from the Getty Art & Architecture Thesaurus.
This term and its description were created from data gathered from the Thésaurus de la désignation des objets mobiliers (2014).

URI: http://sparql.cwrc.ca/ontologies/genre#multimedia
Tag: genre:multimedia
prov:wasDerivedFrom: http://data.culture.fr/thesaurus/page/ark:/67717/T69-7979 http://vocab.getty.edu/aat/300047910
rdf:type: genre:LiteraryGenre skos:Concept
skos:inScheme: genre:LiteraryGenre

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musical writing

Writing associated with some form of music.

URI: http://sparql.cwrc.ca/ontologies/genre#musicalWriting
Tag: genre:musicalWriting
rdf:type: genre:LiteraryGenre skos:Concept
skos:inScheme: genre:LiteraryGenre
skos:narrowerTransitive: genre:anthem genre:hymn genre:opera genre:oriental

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musicology

"Writing dealing with the scientific study of music." (Getty, 2017)

Comment: This term and its description were created from data gathered from the Getty Art & Architecture Thesaurus.
This term and its description were created from data gathered from DBpedia.

URI: http://sparql.cwrc.ca/ontologies/genre#musicology
Tag: genre:musicology
prov:wasDerivedFrom: dbpedia:Musicology http://vocab.getty.edu/aat/300054240
rdf:type: genre:LiteraryGenre skos:Concept
skos:broaderTransitive: genre:scholarship
skos:inScheme: genre:LiteraryGenre

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mystery

"A novel focused on suspense and solving a mystery--especially a murder, theft, kidnapping, or some other crime. The protagonist faces inexplicable events, threats, assaults, and unknown forces or antagonists. Conventionally, the hero is a keenly observant individual (such as Sherlock Holmes) and the police are depicted as incompetent or incapable of solving the crime by themselves. Many of the works of Sir Arthur Conan Doyle, Edgar Allan Poe, and Agatha Christie are mystery novels." (L. K Wheeler, 2017)

Comment: This term and its description were created from data gathered from polars.org.
The description for this term is indebted to Dr. L. Kip Wheeler of Carson-Newman University.

URI: http://sparql.cwrc.ca/ontologies/genre#mystery
Tag: genre:mystery
prov:wasDerivedFrom: http://web.cn.edu/kwheeler/lit_terms_m.html https://www.polars.org/spip.php?article12
rdf:type: genre:LiteraryGenre skos:Concept
skos:broaderTransitive: genre:fiction
skos:inScheme: genre:LiteraryGenre
skos:narrowerTransitive: genre:detective

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myth

"Legendary stories without a determinable basis of fact or natural explanation, typically concerning a being, hero, deity, or event and explains some practice, rite, or phenomenon of nature." (Getty, 2017)

Comment: The description for this term is indebted to DBpedia.
The description for this term is indebted to the Getty Art & Architecture Thesaurus.

URI: http://sparql.cwrc.ca/ontologies/genre#myth
Tag: genre:myth
prov:wasDerivedFrom: dbpedia:Myth http://vocab.getty.edu/aat/300201023
rdf:type: genre:LiteraryGenre skos:Concept
skos:inScheme: genre:LiteraryGenre

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narrative poetry

"Narrative poetry is a form of poetry that tells a story, often making use of the voices of a narrator and characters as well; the entire story is usually written in metred verse. Narrative poems do not have to follow rhythmic patterns. The poems that make up this genre may be short or long, and the story it relates to may be complex. It is usually well it normally dramatic, with objectives, diverse characters, and metre. Narrative poems include epics, ballads, idylls, and lays. Some narrative poetry takes the form of a novel in verse. An example of this is The Ring and the Book by Robert Browning. In terms of narrative poetry, a romance is a narrative poem that tells a story of chivalry. Examples include the Romance of the Rose or Tennyson's Idylls of the King. Although these examples use medieval and Arthurian materials, romances may also tell stories from classical mythology. Shorter narrative poems are often similar in style to the short story. Sometimes these short narratives are collected into interrelated groups, as with Chaucer's The Canterbury Tales. Some literatures contain prose naose narratives, and the Old Norse sagas include both incidental poetry and the biographies of poets. An example is "The Cremation of Sam McGee" by Robert Service." (DBpedia, 2017)

Comment: The description for this term is indebted to DBpedia.

[skos:altLabel: narrative poem ]

URI: http://sparql.cwrc.ca/ontologies/genre#narrativePoetry
Tag: genre:narrativePoetry
prov:wasDerivedFrom: dbpedia:Narrative_poetry
rdf:type: genre:LiteraryGenre skos:Concept
skos:broaderTransitive: genre:poetry
skos:inScheme: genre:LiteraryGenre

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national tale

"A romantic genre developed in early nineteenth-century, particularly associated with Ireland and Scotland, in which historical content is woven into narratives treating such subjects as the formation or defence of a nation, political conflict with a bearing on nationhood, and national identity or culture." (Foster, 2006)

Comment: This term and its description were created from data gathered from The Cambridge Companion to the Irish Novel.

URI: http://sparql.cwrc.ca/ontologies/genre#nationalTale
Tag: genre:nationalTale
prov:wasDerivedFrom: https://books.google.ca/books?id=b2uvkN2taiQC&printsec=frontcover&redir_esc=y#v=onepage&q&f=false
rdf:type: genre:LiteraryGenre skos:Concept
skos:broaderTransitive: genre:historical genre:novel
skos:inScheme: genre:LiteraryGenre

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notebook

"Notebook is a style of writing where people jot down what they have thought or heard at the spur of moment. The contents of a notebook are unorganized, and the number of subjects covered in a notebook are unlimited: a paragraph of autobiography can be followed immediately by one on astronomy or one on history. Some famous authors are also famous for the notebooks they left. The Italian poet Giacomo Leopardi kept a notebook, called Zibaldone, from 1817 to 1832. The idea of keeping that, which contains no fewer than 4,526 pages, was possibly suggested by a priest who fled from the French Revolution and came to live in the poet's hometown. The priest suggested that "every literary man should have a written chaos such as this: notebook containing sottiseries, adrersa, excerpta, pugillares, commentaria... the store-house out of which fine literature of every kind may come, as the sun, moon, and stars issued out of chaos." There are writers who earned their posthumous fame solely by their notebooks, such as the German scientist and humorous writer Georg Lichtenberg. He called his notebooks "waste book," using the English book-keeping term. He explains the purpose of his "waste book" in his notebook E: The notebooks of scientists, such as those of Michael Faraday and Charles Darwin, can reveal the development of their scientific theories. On the other hand, the notebooks used by scientists for recording their experiments are called lab notebooks. The notebooks used by artists are usually referred as sketchbooks, which may contain more than sketches. Leonardo da Vinci's notebooks contain his writings on painting, sculpture, architecture, anatomy, mining, inventions and music, as well as his sketches, his grocery lists and the names of people who owed him money. In Chinese literature, "notebook" or biji is a distinct genre, and has a broader meaning." (DBpedia, 2017)

Comment: This term and its description were created from data gathered from CRHQ CNRS.
The description for this term is indebted to DBpedia.

URI: http://sparql.cwrc.ca/ontologies/genre#notebook
Tag: genre:notebook
prov:wasDerivedFrom: dbpedia:Notebook_(style) http://www.ego.1939-1945.crhq.cnrs.fr/genreslitteraires.pdf
rdf:type: genre:LiteraryGenre skos:Concept
skos:inScheme: genre:LiteraryGenre
skos:related: genre:commonplaceBook

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novel

"Invented prose narratives of considerable length and a certain complexity that deal imaginatively with human experience through a connected sequence of events involving a group of persons in a specific setting." (Getty, 2017)

Comment: This term and its description were created from data gathered from DBpedia.
The description for this term is indebted to the Getty Art & Architecture Thesaurus.

URI: http://sparql.cwrc.ca/ontologies/genre#novel
Tag: genre:novel
prov:wasDerivedFrom: http://dbpedia.org/ontology/Novel http://vocab.getty.edu/aat/300202580
rdf:type: genre:LiteraryGenre skos:Concept
skos:broaderTransitive: genre:fiction
skos:inScheme: genre:LiteraryGenre
skos:narrowerTransitive: genre:aclef genre:bildungsroman genre:conditionOfEnglandNovel genre:domestic genre:industrialNovel genre:nationalTale genre:novella genre:sensationNovel genre:silverForkNovel genre:verseNovel

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novella

"Short prose tales popular in the Renaissance and for later prose narratives intermediate between novels and short stories." (Getty, 2017)

Comment: The description for this term is indebted to the Getty Art & Architecture Thesaurus.

URI: http://sparql.cwrc.ca/ontologies/genre#novella
Tag: genre:novella
prov:wasDerivedFrom: http://vocab.getty.edu/aat/300202569
rdf:type: genre:LiteraryGenre skos:Concept
skos:broaderTransitive: genre:novel
skos:inScheme: genre:LiteraryGenre

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nursery rhyme

"Tales in rhymed verse for children." (Getty, 2017)

Comment: The description for this term is indebted to the Getty Art & Architecture Thesaurus.

URI: http://sparql.cwrc.ca/ontologies/genre#nurseryRhyme
Tag: genre:nurseryRhyme
prov:wasDerivedFrom: http://vocab.getty.edu/aat/300202593
rdf:type: genre:LiteraryGenre skos:Concept
skos:broaderTransitive: genre:childrensLiterature genre:poetry
skos:inScheme: genre:LiteraryGenre

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obituary

"An obituary (obit for short) is a news article that reports the recent death of a person, typically along with an account of the person's life and information about the upcoming funeral." (DBpedia, 2018)

Comment: This term and its description were created from data gathered from DBpedia.
The description for this term is indebted to DBpedia.

URI: http://sparql.cwrc.ca/ontologies/genre#obituary
Tag: genre:obituary
prov:wasDerivedFrom: http://dbpedia.org/page/Obituary
rdf:type: genre:LiteraryGenre skos:Concept
skos:inScheme: genre:LiteraryGenre

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occasional poetry

Occasional poetry is poetry composed for a particular occasion. In the history of literature, it is often studied in connection with orality, performance, and patronage.

Comment: The description for this term is indebted to DBpedia.

URI: http://sparql.cwrc.ca/ontologies/genre#occasionalPoetry
Tag: genre:occasionalPoetry
prov:wasDerivedFrom: dbpedia:Occasional_poetry
rdf:type: genre:LiteraryGenre skos:Concept
skos:broaderTransitive: genre:poetry
skos:inScheme: genre:LiteraryGenre

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ode

"Lyric poems of exalted emotion devoted to the praise or celebration of its subject; often employing complex or irregular metrical form." (Getty, 2017)

Comment: The description for this term is indebted to the Getty Art & Architecture Thesaurus.

URI: http://sparql.cwrc.ca/ontologies/genre#ode
Tag: genre:ode
prov:wasDerivedFrom: http://vocab.getty.edu/aat/300253045
rdf:type: genre:LiteraryGenre skos:Concept
skos:broaderTransitive: genre:poetry
skos:inScheme: genre:LiteraryGenre

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one-act play

"A theatre production of only one act, typically under an hour in length and with a very small cast." (Penguin, 1999)

Comment: This term and its description were created from data gathered from the Penguin Dictionary of Literary Terms & Literary Theory, 4th ed.

[skos:altLabel: one-act-drama ]

URI: http://sparql.cwrc.ca/ontologies/genre#oneActPlay
Tag: genre:oneActPlay
prov:wasDerivedFrom: https://www.politicalavenue.com/10862/ENGLISH-LANGUAGE-BOOKS/English%20-%20Penguin%20Dictionary%20Of%20Literary%20Terms%20And%20Literary%20Theory.pdf
rdf:type: genre:LiteraryGenre skos:Concept
skos:broaderTransitive: genre:drama
skos:inScheme: genre:LiteraryGenre

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opera

"Dramatic musical performances in which most roles are sung with instrumental accompanyment, usually including arias, recitives, and choruses. Typically, they are intended to be staged with costumes, sets, and dramatic movement." (Getty, 2017)

Comment: This term and its description were created from data gathered from the Getty Art & Architecture Thesaurus.
This term and its description were created from data gathered from DBpedia.

URI: http://sparql.cwrc.ca/ontologies/genre#opera
Tag: genre:opera
prov:wasDerivedFrom: dbpedia:Opera http://vocab.getty.edu/aat/300054147
rdf:type: genre:LiteraryGenre skos:Concept
skos:broaderTransitive: genre:musicalWriting
skos:inScheme: genre:LiteraryGenre
skos:narrowerTransitive: genre:balladOpera genre:libretto

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oratorio

"A lengthy musical composition for voice and orchestra, typically narrative and religious in nature. Unlike an opera, it is not a theatrical performance and does not include costumes or sets." (Oxford, 2015)

Comment: This term and its description were created from data gathered from the Oxford Dictionary of English, 3rd ed.
This term and its description were created from data gathered from DBpedia.

URI: http://sparql.cwrc.ca/ontologies/genre#oratorio
Tag: genre:oratorio
prov:wasDerivedFrom: dbpedia:Oratorio http://www.oxfordreference.com/view/10.1093/acref/9780199571123.001.0001/m_en_gb0584450?rskey=HQtgpp%26result=65571
rdf:type: genre:LiteraryGenre skos:Concept
skos:broaderTransitive: genre:song
skos:inScheme: genre:LiteraryGenre

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orientalist

"Writing about the East by Western writers and with a Western perspective, encompassing everything from fiction to scientific writing. In Orientalist writing, even if not looked down upon as inferior, Eastern cultures are represented as foreign and exotic, and in need of translation, interpretation, or explanation." (Penguin, 1999)

Comment: This term and its description were created from data gathered from DBpedia.
This term and its description were created from data gathered from the Penguin Dictionary of Literary Terms & Literary Theory, 4th ed.

URI: http://sparql.cwrc.ca/ontologies/genre#oriental
Tag: genre:oriental
prov:wasDerivedFrom: dbpedia:Orientalism https://www.politicalavenue.com/10862/ENGLISH-LANGUAGE-BOOKS/English%20-%20Penguin%20Dictionary%20Of%20Literary%20Terms%20And%20Literary%20Theory.pdf
rdf:type: genre:LiteraryGenre skos:Concept
skos:broaderTransitive: genre:musicalWriting genre:thematicWriting
skos:inScheme: genre:LiteraryGenre

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pageant

"Entertainments, frequently held in the open air, illustrating themes by means of spectacle rather than by consecutive narrative and dramatic characterization." (Getty, 2017)

Comment: This term and its description were created from data gathered from the Getty Art & Architecture Thesaurus.

URI: http://sparql.cwrc.ca/ontologies/genre#pageant
Tag: genre:pageant
prov:wasDerivedFrom: http://vocab.getty.edu/aat/300069240
rdf:type: genre:LiteraryGenre skos:Concept
skos:broaderTransitive: genre:drama
skos:inScheme: genre:LiteraryGenre

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panegyric

"A speech or poem designed to praise another person or group. In ancient Greek and Roman rhetoric, it was one branch of public speaking, with established rules and conventions found in the works of Menander and Hermogenes. Famous examples include Pliny's eulogy on Emperor Trajan and Isocrates' oration on the Olympic games of 380." (L. K Wheeler, 2017)

Comment: The description for this term is indebted to Dr. L. Kip Wheeler of Carson-Newman University.
This term and its description were created from data gathered from DBpedia.

URI: http://sparql.cwrc.ca/ontologies/genre#panegyric
Tag: genre:panegyric
prov:wasDerivedFrom: dbpedia:Panegyric http://web.cn.edu/kwheeler/lit_terms_p.html
rdf:type: genre:LiteraryGenre skos:Concept
skos:broaderTransitive: genre:drama
skos:inScheme: genre:LiteraryGenre

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pantomime

"Pantomime (informally panto) is a type of musical comedy stage production, designed for family entertainment. It was developed in England and is still performed there, generally during the Christmas and New Year season and, to a lesser extent, in other English-speaking countries. Modern pantomime includes songs, slapstick comedy and dancing, employs gender-crossing actors, and combines topical humour with a story loosely based on a well-known fairy tale, fable or folk tale. It is a participatory form of theatre, in which the audience is expected to sing along with certain parts of the music and shout out phrases to the performers." (DBpedia, 2017)

Comment: This term and its description were created from data gathered from DBpedia.
This term and its description were created from data gathered from the Dictionnaire Vivant de la Langue Française.

URI: http://sparql.cwrc.ca/ontologies/genre#pantomime
Tag: genre:pantomime
prov:wasDerivedFrom: dbpedia:Pantomime https://dvlf.uchicago.edu/mot/pantomime
rdf:type: genre:LiteraryGenre skos:Concept
skos:broaderTransitive: genre:drama
skos:inScheme: genre:LiteraryGenre

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parable

"Short, fictitious stories that illustrate a moral attitude or religious principle." (Getty, 2017)

Comment: The description for this term is indebted to the Getty Art & Architecture Thesaurus.
The description for this term is indebted to DBpedia.

URI: http://sparql.cwrc.ca/ontologies/genre#parable
Tag: genre:parable
prov:wasDerivedFrom: dbpedia:Parable http://vocab.getty.edu/aat/300185342
rdf:type: genre:LiteraryGenre skos:Concept
skos:BroaderTransitive: genre:Didactic
skos:inScheme: genre:LiteraryGenre

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paratext

"Text surrounding the main body of a written work that contains supplementary information about the body, such as a preface, afterword, footnote, or glossary." (Oxford, 2015)

Comment: This term and its description were created from data gathered from the Oxford Dictionary of Literary Terms, 4th ed.

URI: http://sparql.cwrc.ca/ontologies/genre#paratext
Tag: genre:paratext
prov:wasDerivedFrom: https://books.google.ca/books?id=s4FMCAAAQBAJ&printsec=frontcover&source=gbs_ge_summary_r&cad=0#v=onepage&q&f=false
rdf:type: genre:LiteraryGenre skos:Concept
skos:inScheme: genre:LiteraryGenre
skos:narrowerTransitive: genre:afterword genre:annotation genre:dedication genre:epilogue genre:introduction genre:prefatoryPiece genre:prologue

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parody

"A parody (/ˈpærədi/; also called spoof, send-up, take-off or lampoon), in use, is a work created to imitate, make fun of, or comment on an original work, its subject, author, style, or some other target, by means of satiric or ironic imitation. As the literary theorist Linda Hutcheon puts it, "parody … is imitation, not always at the expense of the parodied text." Another critic, Simon Dentith, defines parody as "any cultural practice which provides a relatively polemical allusive imitation of another cultural production or practice."Parody may be found in art or culture, including literature, music (although "parody" in music has an earlier, somewhat different meaning than for other art forms), animation, gaming and film. The writer and critic John Gross observes in his Oxford Book of Parodies, that parody seems to flourish on territory somewhere between pastiche ("a composition in another artist's manner, without satirical intent") and burlesque (which "fools around with the material of high literature and adapts it to low ends"). Meanwhile, the Encyclopédie of Denis Diderot distinguishes between the parody and the burlesque, "A good parody is a fine amusement, capable of amusing and instructing the most sensible and polished minds; the burlesque is a miserable buffoonery which can only please the populace." Historically, when a formula grows tired, as in the case of the moralistic melodramas in the 1910s, it retains value only as a parody, as demonstrated by the Buster Keaton shorts that mocked that genre. In his 1960 anthology of parody from the 14th through 20th centuries, critic Dwight Macdonald offered this metaphor: "Parody is making a new wine that tastes like the old but has a slightly lethal effect." (DBpedia, 2017)

Comment: The description for this term is indebted to DBpedia.

URI: http://sparql.cwrc.ca/ontologies/genre#parody
Tag: genre:parody
prov:wasDerivedFrom: dbpedia:Parody
rdf:type: genre:LiteraryGenre skos:Concept
skos:inScheme: genre:LiteraryGenre

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pastoral

"Genre that depicts or evokes idyllic life in the country; in works of pictorial art, often scenes of shepherds and shepherdesses in idealized arcadian landscapes." (Getty, 2017)

Comment: The description for this term is indebted to the Getty Art & Architecture Thesaurus.

URI: http://sparql.cwrc.ca/ontologies/genre#pastoral
Tag: genre:pastoral
prov:wasDerivedFrom: http://vocab.getty.edu/aat/300250491
rdf:type: genre:LiteraryGenre skos:Concept
skos:broaderTransitive: genre:thematicWriting
skos:inScheme: genre:LiteraryGenre

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pedagogy

"Writing dealing with the theory and practice of teaching." (Oxford, 2015)

Comment: This term and its description were created from data gathered from the Oxford Dictionary of English, 3rd ed.
This term and its description were created from data gathered from DBpedia.

URI: http://sparql.cwrc.ca/ontologies/genre#pedagogy
Tag: genre:pedagogy
prov:wasDerivedFrom: dbpedia:Pedagogy http://www.oxfordreference.com/view/10.1093/acref/9780199571123.001.0001/m_en_gb0614030?rskey=II64E5%26result=68781
rdf:type: genre:LiteraryGenre skos:Concept
skos:broaderTransitive: genre:scholarship
skos:inScheme: genre:LiteraryGenre
skos:narrowerTransitive: genre:grammar genre:quiz genre:textbook

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performance poetry

"Performance poetry is poetry that is specifically composed for or during a performance before an audience. During the 1980s, the term came into popular usage to describe poetry written or composed for performance rather than print distribution." (DBpedia, 2017)

Comment: The description for this term is indebted to DBpedia.

URI: http://sparql.cwrc.ca/ontologies/genre#performancePoetry
Tag: genre:performancePoetry
prov:wasDerivedFrom: dbpedia:Performance_poetry
rdf:type: genre:LiteraryGenre skos:Concept
skos:broaderTransitive: genre:poetry
skos:inScheme: genre:LiteraryGenre

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periodical

"Publications issued at regular intervals, but not daily, containing articles on various subjects by different authors for the general reader." (Getty, 2017)

Comment: The description for this term is indebted to the Getty Art & Architecture Thesaurus.

URI: http://sparql.cwrc.ca/ontologies/genre#periodical
Tag: genre:periodical
prov:wasDerivedFrom: http://vocab.getty.edu/aat/300026657
rdf:type: genre:LiteraryGenre skos:Concept
skos:inScheme: genre:LiteraryGenre

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petition

"Includes any written requests and lists of signatures submitted to an authority to appeal for the performance of specific action." (Getty, 2017)

Comment: This term and its description were created from data gathered from DBpedia.
The description for this term is indebted to the Getty Art & Architecture Thesaurus.

URI: http://sparql.cwrc.ca/ontologies/genre#petition
Tag: genre:petition
prov:wasDerivedFrom: dbpedia:Petition http://vocab.getty.edu/aat/300027219
rdf:type: genre:LiteraryGenre skos:Concept
skos:broaderTransitive: genre:politicalWriting
skos:inScheme: genre:LiteraryGenre

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philosophical

Writing engaging in philosophical questions, that may or may not be considered philosophy per se.

URI: http://sparql.cwrc.ca/ontologies/genre#philosophical
Tag: genre:philosophical
rdf:type: genre:LiteraryGenre skos:Concept
skos:broaderTransitive: genre:scholarship
skos:inScheme: genre:LiteraryGenre
skos:narrowerTransitive: genre:feministTheory genre:philosophy

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philosophy

"(Greek, "Love of wisdom"): The methodical and systematic exploration of what we know, how we know it, and why it is important that we know it. Too frequently, students use the term somewhat nebulously. They often mistakenly state, "My philosophy about X is . . ." when they really mean, "My opinion about X is . . ." or "My attitude toward X is . . ." Traditional areas of Western philosophic inquiry include the following areas." (L. K Wheeler, 2017)

Comment: The description for this term is indebted to Dr. L. Kip Wheeler of Carson-Newman University.
This term and its description were created from data gathered from DBpedia.

URI: http://sparql.cwrc.ca/ontologies/genre#philosophy
Tag: genre:philosophy
prov:wasDerivedFrom: dbpedia:Philosophy http://web.cn.edu/kwheeler/lit_terms_p.html
rdf:type: genre:LiteraryGenre skos:Concept
skos:broaderTransitive: genre:philosophical
skos:inScheme: genre:LiteraryGenre

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picaresque

"The picaresque novel (Spanish: "picaresca," from "pícaro," for "rogue" or "rascal") is a genre of prose fiction which depicts the adventures of a roguish hero of low social class who lives by his wits in a corrupt society. Picaresque novels typically adopt a realistic style, with elements of comedy and satire. This style of novel originated in 16th-century Spain and flourished throughout Europe in the 17th and 18th centuries. It continues to influence modern literature. According to the traditional view of Thrall and Hibbard (first published in 1936), seven qualities distinguish the picaresque novel or narrative form, all or some of which may be employed for effect by the author. (1) A picaresque narrative is usually written in first person as an autobiographical account. (2) The main character is often of low character or social class. He or she gets by with wit and rarely deigns to hold a job. (3) There is no plot. The story is told in a series of loosely connected adventures or episodes. (4) There is little if any character development in the main character. Once a picaro, always a picaro. His or her circumstances may change but they rarely result in a change of heart. (5) The picaro's story is told with a plainness of language or realism. (6) Satire might sometimes be a prominent element. (7) The behavior of a picaresque hero or heroine stops just short of criminality. Carefree or immoral rascality positions the picaresque hero as a sympathetic outsider, untouched by the false rules of society. However, Trall and Hibbert's thesis has been questioned by scholars[specify] interested in how genre functions, rather than how it looks on the surface." (DBpedia, 2017)

Comment: The description for this term is indebted to DBpedia.

URI: http://sparql.cwrc.ca/ontologies/genre#picaresque
Tag: genre:picaresque
prov:wasDerivedFrom: dbpedia:Picaresque_novel
rdf:type: genre:LiteraryGenre skos:Concept
skos:broaderTransitive: genre:fiction
skos:inScheme: genre:LiteraryGenre

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pindaric

"Pindarics (alternatively Pindariques or Pindaricks) was a term for a class of loose and irregular odes greatly in fashion in England during the close of the 17th and the beginning of the 18th century. Abraham Cowley, who published fifteen Pindarique Odes in 1656, was the poet most identified with the form though many others had composed irregular verses before him. The term is derived from the name of a Greek archaic poet, Pindar, but is based on a misconception since Pindar's odes were in fact very formal, obeying a triadic structure, in which the form of the first stanza (strophe) was repeated in the second stanza (antistrophe), followed by a third stanza (epode) that introduced variations but whose form was repeated by other epodes in subsequent triads." (DBpedia, 2017)

Comment: Encyclopædia Universalis This term and its description were created from data gathered from Encyclopaedia Universalis.
This term and its description were created from data gathered from DBpedia.

URI: http://sparql.cwrc.ca/ontologies/genre#pindaric
Tag: genre:pindaric
prov:wasDerivedFrom: dbpedia:Pindarics http://www.universalis.fr/encyclopedie/ode-pindarique/
rdf:type: genre:LiteraryGenre skos:Concept
skos:broaderTransitive: genre:poetry
skos:inScheme: genre:LiteraryGenre

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poetry

"Poetry is a form of literature that uses aesthetic and rhythmic qualities of language—such as phonaesthetics, sound symbolism, and metre—to evoke meanings in addition to, or in place of, the prosaic ostensible meaning." (DBpedia, 2017)

Comment: The description for this term is indebted to DBpedia.

URI: http://sparql.cwrc.ca/ontologies/genre#poetry
Tag: genre:poetry
prov:wasDerivedFrom: dbpedia:Poetry
rdf:type: genre:LiteraryGenre skos:Concept
skos:inScheme: genre:LiteraryGenre
skos:narrowerTransitive: genre:acrostic genre:anagram genre:apology genre:ballad genre:boutsRimés genre:clerihew genre:dramaticMonologue genre:elegy genre:epithalamium genre:georgic genre:graveyardPoetry genre:haiku genre:heroic genre:hymn genre:lais genre:lyric genre:narrativePoetry genre:nurseryRhyme genre:occasionalPoetry genre:ode genre:performancePoetry genre:pindaric genre:psalm genre:sonnet genre:topographicalPoetry genre:verseNovel genre:villanelle

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polemic

"Aggressive, forcefully presented arguments, often disputing a policy or opinion." (Getty, 2017)

Comment: The description for this term is indebted to DBpedia.
The description for this term is indebted to the Getty Art & Architecture Thesaurus.

[skos:altLabel: polemics ]

URI: http://sparql.cwrc.ca/ontologies/genre#polemic
Tag: genre:polemic
prov:wasDerivedFrom: dbpedia:Polemic http://vocab.getty.edu/aat/300252982
rdf:type: genre:LiteraryGenre skos:Concept
skos:inScheme: genre:LiteraryGenre

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political writing

Writing on the subject of politics, often persuasive in tone and written in favour of a particular political party or cause.

[skos:altLabel: political ]

URI: http://sparql.cwrc.ca/ontologies/genre#politicalWriting
Tag: genre:politicalWriting
rdf:type: genre:LiteraryGenre skos:Concept
skos:inScheme: genre:LiteraryGenre
skos:narrowerTransitive: genre:agitprop genre:conditionOfEnglandNovel genre:feminist genre:manifesto genre:petition genre:proletarianWriting genre:propaganda genre:tractPamphlet

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prayer

"Reverent petitions, usually in verse or prose, to a deity or other spiritual entity." (Getty, 2017)

Comment: This term and its description were created from data gathered from the Getty Art & Architecture Thesaurus.

URI: http://sparql.cwrc.ca/ontologies/genre#prayer
Tag: genre:prayer
prov:wasDerivedFrom: http://vocab.getty.edu/aat/300026452
rdf:type: genre:LiteraryGenre skos:Concept
skos:broaderTransitive: genre:religious
skos:inScheme: genre:LiteraryGenre

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prefatory piece

"Texts preceding the main literary work and containing comments about such matters as the reason for or circumstances of the author's writing the work, or comments by another about the author or the work." (Getty, 2017)

Comment: This term and its description were created from data gathered from DBpedia.
This term and its description were created from data gathered from the Getty Art & Architecture Thesaurus.

URI: http://sparql.cwrc.ca/ontologies/genre#prefatoryPiece
Tag: genre:prefatoryPiece
prov:wasDerivedFrom: dbpedia:Preface http://vocab.getty.edu/aat/300055032
rdf:type: genre:LiteraryGenre skos:Concept
skos:broaderTransitive: genre:paratext
skos:inScheme: genre:LiteraryGenre

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proletarian writing

Writing by members of the working-classes or poor, including that by those who consider themselves members of the proletariat, and sometimes also writing produced to raise awareness of poor economic or labour conditions.

Comment: This term and its description were created from data gathered from DBpedia.

URI: http://sparql.cwrc.ca/ontologies/genre#proletarianWriting
Tag: genre:proletarianWriting
prov:wasDerivedFrom: dbpedia:Proletarian_literature
rdf:type: genre:LiteraryGenre skos:Concept
skos:broaderTransitive: genre:politicalWriting
skos:inScheme: genre:LiteraryGenre

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prologue

"(1) In original Greek tragedy, the prologue was either the action or a set of introductory speeches before the first entry (parados) of the chorus. Here, a single actor's monologue or a dialogue between two actors would establish the play's background events. (2) In later literature, a prologue is a section of any introductory material before the first chapter or the main material of a prose work, or any such material before the first stanza of a poetic work." (L. K Wheeler, 2017)

Comment: This term and its description were created from data gathered from DBpedia.
The description for this term is indebted to Dr. L. Kip Wheeler of Carson-Newman University.

URI: http://sparql.cwrc.ca/ontologies/genre#prologue
Tag: genre:prologue
prov:wasDerivedFrom: dbpedia:Prologue http://web.cn.edu/kwheeler/lit_terms_p.html
rdf:type: genre:LiteraryGenre skos:Concept
skos:broaderTransitive: genre:paratext
skos:inScheme: genre:LiteraryGenre

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propaganda

1- "(Latin, "things that must be sent forth"): In its original use, the term referred to a committee of cardinals the Roman Catholic church founded in 1622 (the Congregatio de propaganda fide). This group established specific educational materials to be sent with priests-in-training for foreign missions . The term is today used to refer to information, rumors, ideas, and artwork spread deliberately to help or harm another specific group, movement, belief, institution, or government. The term's connotations are mostly negative. When literature or journalism is propaganda and when it is not is hotly debated. For instance, the Roman Emperor Augustus commissioned Virgil to write The Aeneid for specific goals. He wanted Virgil to glorify Rome's greatness, instill public pride in Rome's past, and cultivate traditional Roman virtues such as loyalty to the family, the Empire, and the gods. Is this propaganda? Or patriotism? Typically, readers claim a work is propaganda when it sets forth an argument with which they personally disagree. In other cases, readers will call a work propagandistic if they can perceive that the characters or the author advances particular doctrines or principles. Harry Shaw notes: "Propaganda is attacked by most critics and general readers because it is an attempt to influence opinions and actions deliberately, but by this definition all education and most literature are propagandistic" (220)." (L. K Wheeler, 2017)

2- "Ideas, facts, or allegations spread deliberately to support one cause or individual or to damage another." (Getty, 2017)

Comment: The description for this term is indebted to the Getty Art & Architecture Thesaurus.
This term and its description were created from data gathered from DBpedia.
The description for this term is indebted to Dr. L. Kip Wheeler of Carson-Newman University.

URI: http://sparql.cwrc.ca/ontologies/genre#propaganda
Tag: genre:propaganda
prov:wasDerivedFrom: dbpedia:Propaganda http://vocab.getty.edu/aat/300055539 http://web.cn.edu/kwheeler/lit_terms_p.html
rdf:type: genre:LiteraryGenre skos:Concept
skos:broaderTransitive: genre:politicalWriting
skos:inScheme: genre:LiteraryGenre

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prophecy

"Prophecy involves a process in which one or more messages allegedly communicated to a prophet are then communicated to other people. Such messages typically involve] inspiration, interpretation, or revelation of events to come (compare divine knowledge). Historically, clairvoyance has been used[by whom?] as an adjunct to prophecy." (DBpedia, 2017)

Comment: The description for this term is indebted to DBpedia.

URI: http://sparql.cwrc.ca/ontologies/genre#prophecy
Tag: genre:prophecy
prov:wasDerivedFrom: dbpedia:Prophecy
rdf:type: genre:LiteraryGenre skos:Concept
skos:broaderTransitive: genre:religious
skos:inScheme: genre:LiteraryGenre

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psalm

"Sacred songs that may be sung or recited in religious worship, particularly those contained in the Book of Psalms in the Old Testament and Hebrew Scriptures." (Getty, 2017)

Comment: This term and its description were created from data gathered from the Getty Art & Architecture Thesaurus.
This term and its description were created from data gathered from the Dictionnaire Vivant de la Langue Française.

URI: http://sparql.cwrc.ca/ontologies/genre#psalm
Tag: genre:psalm
prov:wasDerivedFrom: http://vocab.getty.edu/aat/300400527 https://dvlf.uchicago.edu/mot/psaume
rdf:type: genre:LiteraryGenre skos:Concept
skos:broaderTransitive: genre:poetry genre:religious
skos:inScheme: genre:LiteraryGenre

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psychoanalytical

Writing related to the field of psychology or psychiatry, particularly in connection with Sigmund Freud’s theories of psychoanalysis.

URI: http://sparql.cwrc.ca/ontologies/genre#psychoanalytical
Tag: genre:psychoanalytical
rdf:type: genre:LiteraryGenre skos:Concept
skos:broaderTransitive: genre:scholarship
skos:inScheme: genre:LiteraryGenre

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quiz

A brief, interactive text that poses questions for the reader to answer, often as an assessment of knowledge in the form of questionnaire.

Comment: This term and its description were created from data gathered from DBpedia.

URI: http://sparql.cwrc.ca/ontologies/genre#quiz
Tag: genre:quiz
prov:wasDerivedFrom: dbpedia:Quiz
rdf:type: genre:LiteraryGenre skos:Concept
skos:broaderTransitive: genre:pedagogy
skos:inScheme: genre:LiteraryGenre

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radio drama

"Radio drama (or audio drama, audio play, radio play, radio theater, or audio theater) is a dramatized, purely acoustic performance, broadcast on radio. With no visual component, radio drama depends on dialogue, music and sound effects to help the listener imagine the characters and story." (DBpedia, 2017)

Comment: This term and its description were created from data gathered from DBpedia.

URI: http://sparql.cwrc.ca/ontologies/genre#radioDrama
Tag: genre:radioDrama
prov:wasDerivedFrom: dbpedia:Radio_drama
rdf:type: genre:LiteraryGenre skos:Concept
skos:broaderTransitive: genre:drama
skos:inScheme: genre:LiteraryGenre

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realist

1- "General term for a quality of art works in which the depiction is based on or seems to be based on the direct observation of the external world, including or even emphasizing flaws and imperfections rather than the beauty or idealized characteristics. Although a work may be both realistic and naturalistic, naturalism may somewhat idealize the flaws or ugliness of the subject depicted." (Getty, 2017)

2- "Fiction that attempts to capture life as it is, rejecting idealism in favour of exposing in detail the realities, including the flaws, of its characters and their lives." (Oxford, 2015)

Comment: This term and its description were created from data gathered from the Oxford Dictionary of Literary Terms, 4th ed.
The description for this term is indebted to the Getty Art & Architecture Thesaurus.
This term and its description were created from data gathered from the Getty Art & Architecture Thesaurus and were translated from English by Jade Penancier.

URI: http://sparql.cwrc.ca/ontologies/genre#realist
Tag: genre:realist
prov:wasDerivedFrom: http://vocab.getty.edu/aat/300056550 http://www.oxfordreference.com/view/10.1093/acref/9780199208272.001.0001/acref-9780199208272-e-954?rskey=CNr3ZX%26result=951
rdf:type: genre:LiteraryGenre skos:Concept
skos:broaderTransitive: genre:fiction
skos:inScheme: genre:LiteraryGenre

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regional

Regional writing reflects the details of a specific region, whether in prose or poetry. Regionalism is often associated with rural areas and "local colour", and often allied with realism insofar as it seeks to distinguish one region clearly from others. At its best, as when practiced by Thomas Hardy, William Faulkner, Sara Jeannette Duncan, or Margaret Laurence, regionalism conveys not merely the superficialities or prosaic details of an area but a profound sense of the impact of place on individual characters and destinies.

Comment: Encyclopédie du Canada

URI: http://sparql.cwrc.ca/ontologies/genre#regional
Tag: genre:regional
prov:wasDerivedFrom: http://www.encyclopediecanadienne.ca/fr/article/regionalisme-dans-la-litterature/
rdf:type: genre:LiteraryGenre skos:Concept
skos:broaderTransitive: genre:thematicWriting
skos:inScheme: genre:LiteraryGenre

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religious

Writing dealing with religion or spirituality.

URI: http://sparql.cwrc.ca/ontologies/genre#religious
Tag: genre:religious
rdf:type: genre:LiteraryGenre skos:Concept
skos:inScheme: genre:LiteraryGenre
skos:narrowerTransitive: genre:biblicalParaphrase genre:catechism genre:devotional genre:hagiography genre:hymn genre:liturgy genre:prayer genre:prophecy genre:psalm genre:sermon genre:theology

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review

"Periodicals, reports, or essays giving critical estimates and appraisals of art, a performance, or event." (Getty, 2017)

Comment: This term and its description were created from data gathered from the Getty Art & Architecture Thesaurus.

URI: http://sparql.cwrc.ca/ontologies/genre#review
Tag: genre:review
prov:wasDerivedFrom: http://vocab.getty.edu/aat/300026480
rdf:type: genre:LiteraryGenre skos:Concept
skos:broaderTransitive: genre:informationalWriting
skos:inScheme: genre:LiteraryGenre

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revue

"Periodicals, reports, or essays giving critical estimates and appraisals of art, a performance, or event. For other critical descriptions and analyses, prefer "criticism." (Getty, 2017)

Comment: This term and its description were created from data gathered from DBpedia.
The description for this term is indebted to the Getty Art & Architecture Thesaurus.

URI: http://sparql.cwrc.ca/ontologies/genre#revue
Tag: genre:revue
prov:wasDerivedFrom: dbpedia:Revue http://vocab.getty.edu/aat/300026480
rdf:type: genre:LiteraryGenre skos:Concept
skos:broaderTransitive: genre:journalism
skos:inScheme: genre:LiteraryGenre

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riddle

"(from Old English roedel, from roedan meaning "to give council" or "to read"): A universal form of literature in which a puzzling question or a conundrum is presented to the reader. The reader is often challenged to solve this enigma, which requires ingenuity in discovering the hidden meaning. A riddle may involve puns, symbolism, synecdoche, personification (especially prosopopoeia), or unusual imagery. For instance, a Norse riddle asks, "Tell me what I am. Thirty white horses round a red hill. First they champ. Then they stamp. Now they stand still." The answer is the speaker's teeth; these thirty white horses circle the "red hill" of the tongue; they champ and stamp while the riddler speaks, but stand still at the end of his riddle. Another famous example is the riddle of the sphinx from Sophocles' Oedipus Trilogy. The sphinx asks Oedipus, "What goes on four feet, on two feet, and then three. But the more feet it goes on, the weaker is he?" The answer is a human being, which crawls as an infant, walks erect on two feet as an adult, and totters on a staff (the third leg) in old age. The earliest known English riddles are recorded in the Exeter Book, and they probably date back to the 8th century. Examples, however, can be found in Greek, Sanskrit, Hebrew, Arabic, Persian, and Chinese, and many other languages. Authors of Anglo-Latin riddles include Aldhelm of Sherborne, Archbishop Tatwine of Canterbury, and Abbot Eusebius of Wearmouth. A large Renaissance collection can also be found in Nicolas Reusner's Aenigmatographia (1602)." (L. K Wheeler, 2017)

Comment: The description for this term is indebted to Dr. L. Kip Wheeler of Carson-Newman University.
This term and its description were created from data gathered from the Dictionnaire Vivant de la Langue Française.

URI: http://sparql.cwrc.ca/ontologies/genre#riddle
Tag: genre:riddle
prov:wasDerivedFrom: http://web.cn.edu/kwheeler/lit_terms_r.html https://dvlf.uchicago.edu/mot/%C3%A9nigme
rdf:type: genre:LiteraryGenre skos:Concept
skos:inScheme: genre:LiteraryGenre

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romance

"Poetic or prosaic literary forms derived from medieval narratives of love, legendary or heroic adventures, and chivalry. Extends to narratives about important religious figures, or fantastic or supernatural events." (Getty, 2017)

Comment: The description for this term is indebted to the Getty Art & Architecture Thesaurus.

URI: http://sparql.cwrc.ca/ontologies/genre#romance
Tag: genre:romance
cwrc:contraryTo: genre:antiRomance
prov:wasDerivedFrom: http://vocab.getty.edu/aat/300191065
rdf:type: genre:LiteraryGenre skos:Concept
skos:inScheme: genre:LiteraryGenre
skos:narrowerTransitive: genre:courtshipFiction

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sage writing

"Sage writing was a genre of creative nonfiction popular in the Victorian era. The concept originates with John Holloway's 1953 book The Victorian Sage: Studies in Argument. Sage writing is a development from ancient wisdom literature in which the writer chastises and instructs the reader about contemporary social issues, often utilizing discourses of philosophy, history, politics, and economics in non-technical ways. Prominent examples of the genre include writings by Thomas Carlyle, Matthew Arnold, John Ruskin, and Henry David Thoreau. Some 20th-century writers, such as Joan Didion and New Journalists such as Norman Mailer and Tom Wolfe, have also been identified as sage writers." (DBpedia, 2017)

Comment: The description for this term is indebted to DBpedia.

URI: http://sparql.cwrc.ca/ontologies/genre#sageWriting
Tag: genre:sageWriting
prov:wasDerivedFrom: dbpedia:Sage_writing
rdf:type: genre:LiteraryGenre skos:Concept
skos:inScheme: genre:LiteraryGenre

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satire

"Literary compositions in verse or prose, or ideas expressed as the subjects of art works, in which human folly and vice are held up to scorn, derision, or ridicule." (Getty, 2017)

Comment: The description for this term is indebted to DBpedia.
The description for this term is indebted to the Getty Art & Architecture Thesaurus.

URI: http://sparql.cwrc.ca/ontologies/genre#satire
Tag: genre:satire
prov:wasDerivedFrom: dbpedia:Satire http://vocab.getty.edu/aat/300251297
rdf:type: genre:LiteraryGenre skos:Concept
skos:inScheme: genre:LiteraryGenre
skos:narrowerTransitive: genre:lampoon genre:mockForms

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scholarly writing

Writing by a scholar, either amateur or professional, typically focused on a specific field or topic in which the author is an expert.

[skos:altLabel: scholarship ]

URI: http://sparql.cwrc.ca/ontologies/genre#scholarship
Tag: genre:scholarship
rdf:type: genre:LiteraryGenre skos:Concept
skos:broaderTransitive: genre:informationalWriting
skos:inScheme: genre:LiteraryGenre
skos:narrowerTransitive: genre:artCriticism genre:companion genre:dictionary genre:dissertation genre:feministTheory genre:legalWriting genre:literaryCriticism genre:medicalWriting genre:musicology genre:pedagogy genre:philosophical genre:psychoanalytical genre:scientificWriting genre:socialScience

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school fiction

"The school story is a fiction genre centering on older pre-adolescent and adolescent school life, at its most popular in the first half of the twentieth century. While examples do exist in other countries, it is most commonly set in English boarding schools and mostly written in girls' and boys' subgenres, reflecting the single-sex education typical until the 1950s. It focuses largely on friendship, honor and loyalty between pupils. Plots involving sports events, bullies, secrets, rivalry and bravery are often used to shape the school story." (DBpedia, 2017)

Comment: This term and its description were created from data gathered from DBpedia.

[skos:altLabel: school story ]

URI: http://sparql.cwrc.ca/ontologies/genre#schoolFiction
Tag: genre:schoolFiction
prov:wasDerivedFrom: dbpedia:School_story
rdf:type: genre:LiteraryGenre skos:Concept
skos:broaderTransitive: genre:fiction
skos:inScheme: genre:LiteraryGenre

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science fiction

"Science fiction is a genre of speculative fiction dealing with imaginative concepts such as futuristic settings, futuristic science and technology, space travel, time travel, faster than light travel, parallel universes and extraterrestrial life. Science fiction often explores the potential consequences of scientific and other innovations, and has been called a "literature of ideas." It usually eschews the supernatural, and unlike the related genre of fantasy, historically science fiction stories were intended to have at least a faint grounding in science-based fact or theory at the time the story was created, but this connection has become tenuous or non-existent in much of science fiction." (DBpedia, 2017)

Comment: The description for this term is indebted to DBpedia.

URI: http://sparql.cwrc.ca/ontologies/genre#scienceFiction
Tag: genre:scienceFiction
prov:wasDerivedFrom: dbpedia:Science_fiction
rdf:type: genre:LiteraryGenre skos:Concept
skos:broaderTransitive: genre:fiction
skos:inScheme: genre:LiteraryGenre
skos:related: genre:fantasy

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scientific writing

Writing relating to scientific research, often reporting the findings of a particular scientific study.

URI: http://sparql.cwrc.ca/ontologies/genre#scientificWriting
Tag: genre:scientificWriting
rdf:type: genre:LiteraryGenre skos:Concept
skos:broaderTransitive: genre:scholarship
skos:inScheme: genre:LiteraryGenre

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scrapbook

"Blank books or albums designed so that a variety of items may be affixed to the pages, including photographs, clippings, and other memorabilia." (Getty, 2017)

Comment: This term and its description were created from data gathered from the Getty Art & Architecture Thesaurus.
This term and its description were created from data gathered from DBpedia.

URI: http://sparql.cwrc.ca/ontologies/genre#scrapbook
Tag: genre:scrapbook
prov:wasDerivedFrom: dbpedia:Photograph_album http://vocab.getty.edu/aat/300027341
rdf:type: genre:LiteraryGenre skos:Concept
skos:inScheme: genre:LiteraryGenre

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sensation novel

"The sensation novel was a literary genre of fiction popular in Great Britain in the 1860s and 1870s, following on from earlier melodramatic novels and the Newgate novels, which focused on tales woven around criminal biographies. It also drew on the gothic and romantic genres of fiction. The sensation novel's appearance notably follows the Industrial Revolution, which made books available on a mass scale for people of all social standings and increased the sensation novel's popularity. Sensation novels used both modes of romance and realism to the extreme where in the past they had traditionally been contradictory modes of literature. The sensation novelists commonly wrote stories that were allegorical and abstract; the abstract nature of the stories gave the authors room to explore scenarios that wrestled with the social anxieties of the Victorian Era. The loss of identity is seen in many sensation fiction stories because this was a common social anxiety; in Britain, there was an increased use in record keeping and therefore people questioned the meaning and permanence of identity. The social anxiety regarding identity is reflected in stories, such as, The Woman in White and Lady Audley's Secret. The genre of sensation fiction was established by the publications of the following novels The Woman in White by Wilkie Collins in 1859; East Lynne by Ellen Wood in 1861; Lady Audley's Secret by Mary Elizabeth Braddon in 1862. Perhaps the earliest use of the term, sensation fiction, as a name for such novels appears in the 1861 edition of the Saunders, Otley, & co.'s Literary Budget. The neo-Victorian novel of New Zealand author Eleanor Catton, The Luminaries, which won the 2013 Man Booker Prize, has been described as being heavily based on sensation literature, with its plot devices of "suspect wills and forged documents, secret marriages, illegitimacy and opium" (DBpedia, 2017)

Comment: The description for this term is indebted to DBpedia.

[skos:altLabel: sensational ]

URI: http://sparql.cwrc.ca/ontologies/genre#sensationNovel
Tag: genre:sensationNovel
prov:wasDerivedFrom: dbpedia:Sensation_novel
rdf:type: genre:LiteraryGenre skos:Concept
skos:broaderTransitive: genre:novel
skos:inScheme: genre:LiteraryGenre

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sentimental

"The sentimental novel or the novel of sensibility is an 18th-century literary genre which celebrates the emotional and intellectual concepts of sentiment, sentimentalism, and sensibility. Sentimentalism, which is to be distinguished from sensibility, was a fashion in both poetry and prose fiction beginning in the eighteenth century in reaction to the rationalism of the Augustan Age. Sentimental novels relied on emotional response, both from their readers and characters. They feature scenes of distress and tenderness, and the plot is arranged to advance both emotions and actions. The result is a valorization of "fine feeling," displaying the characters as a model for refined, sensitive emotional effect. The ability to display feelings was thought to show character and experience, and to shape social life and relations." (DBpedia, 2017)

Comment: The description for this term is indebted to DBpedia.
This term and its description were created from data gathered from Encyclopaedia Universalis.

URI: http://sparql.cwrc.ca/ontologies/genre#sentimental
Tag: genre:sentimental
prov:wasDerivedFrom: dbpedia:Sentimental_novel http://www.universalis.fr/encyclopedie/roman-sentimental/1-une-litterature-populaire/
rdf:type: genre:LiteraryGenre skos:Concept
skos:inScheme: genre:LiteraryGenre

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sequel

"(from Latin sequi, to follow): A literary work complete in itself, but continuing the narrative of an earlier work. It is a new story that extends or develops characters and situations found in an earlier work. Two sequels following an original work (together) are called a trilogy. Three sequels following an original work together are called a tetralogy.Often sequels have a reputation for inferior artistry compared to the original publication since they are often hastily written from the desire to capitalize on earlier financial success. Examples include Mark Twain's Tom Sawyer Abroad, which is a sequel to The Adventures of Tom Sawyer, and Alexandra Ripley's Scarlett, which is a sequel to Mitchell's Gone With the Wind. In the late twentieth century, it became common retroactively to write "prequels," a later book with the same geographic setting or characters, but which takes place in an earlier time." (L. K Wheeler, 2017)

Comment: This term and its description were created from data gathered from DBpedia.
The description for this term is indebted to Dr. L. Kip Wheeler of Carson-Newman University.

URI: http://sparql.cwrc.ca/ontologies/genre#sequel
Tag: genre:sequel
prov:wasDerivedFrom: dbpedia:Sequel http://web.cn.edu/kwheeler/lit_terms_s.html
rdf:type: genre:LiteraryGenre skos:Concept
skos:inScheme: genre:LiteraryGenre

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sermon

"A sermon is an oration, lecture, or talk by a member of a religious institution or clergy. Sermons address a Biblical, theological, religious, or moral topic, usually expounding on a type of belief, law or behavior within both past and present contexts. Elements of the sermon often include exposition, exhortation and practical application. In Christianity, a sermon (also known as a homily within some churches) is usually delivered in a place of worship from an elevated architectural feature, variously known as a pulpit, a lectern, or an ambo. The word "sermon" comes from a Middle English word which was derived from Old French, which in turn came from the Latin word sermō meaning "discourse". The word can mean "conversation", which could mean that early sermons were delivered in the form of question and answer, and that only later did it come to mean a monologue. However, the Bible contains many speeches without interlocution, which some take to be sermons: Moses in Deuteronomy 1-33 ; Jesus' sermon on the mount in Matthew 5-7 (though the gospel writers do not specifically call it a sermon; the popular descriptor for Christ's speech there came much later); Peter after Pentecost in Acts 2:14-40 (though this speech was delivered to nonbelievers and as such is not quite parallel to the popular definition of a sermon). In modern language, the word "sermon" is used in secular terms, pejoratively, to describe a lengthy or tedious speech delivered with great passion, by any person, to an uninterested audience. A sermonette is a short sermon (usually associated with television broadcasting, as stations would present a sermonette before signing off for the night)." (DBpedia, 2017)

Comment: The description for this term is indebted to DBpedia.

URI: http://sparql.cwrc.ca/ontologies/genre#sermon
Tag: genre:sermon
prov:wasDerivedFrom: dbpedia:Sermon
rdf:type: genre:LiteraryGenre skos:Concept
skos:broaderTransitive: genre:religious
skos:inScheme: genre:LiteraryGenre

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sexual awakening fiction

Fiction in which a character, typically an adolescent, experiences sexual desires for the first time or has a first sexual encounter.

URI: http://sparql.cwrc.ca/ontologies/genre#sexualAwakeningFiction
Tag: genre:sexualAwakeningFiction
rdf:type: genre:LiteraryGenre skos:Concept
skos:broaderTransitive: genre:autobiography
skos:inScheme: genre:LiteraryGenre

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short story

"Relatively brief invented prose narratives." (Getty, 2017)

Comment: This term and its description were created from data gathered from DBpedia.
The description for this term is indebted to the Getty Art & Architecture Thesaurus.

URI: http://sparql.cwrc.ca/ontologies/genre#shortStory
Tag: genre:shortStory
prov:wasDerivedFrom: dbpedia:Short_story http://vocab.getty.edu/aat/300202607
rdf:type: genre:LiteraryGenre skos:Concept
skos:broaderTransitive: genre:fiction
skos:inScheme: genre:LiteraryGenre

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silver-fork novel

"A mocking term for a popular literary genre depicting life in upper-class British society in the 1820s-1840s." (Oxford, 2015)

Comment: This term and its description were created from data gathered from the Oxford Dictionary of Literary Terms, 4th ed.

URI: http://sparql.cwrc.ca/ontologies/genre#silverForkNovel
Tag: genre:silverForkNovel
prov:wasDerivedFrom: http://www.oxfordreference.com/view/10.1093/acref/9780199208272.001.0001/acref-9780199208272-e-1057?rskey=bq3DDS%26result=1061
rdf:type: genre:LiteraryGenre skos:Concept
skos:broaderTransitive: genre:novel
skos:inScheme: genre:LiteraryGenre

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sketch

"Short literary compositions on single subjects, often presenting the personal view of the author." (Getty, 2017)

Comment: The description for this term is indebted to the Getty Art & Architecture Thesaurus.
This term and its description were created from data gathered from DBpedia.

URI: http://sparql.cwrc.ca/ontologies/genre#sketch
Tag: genre:sketch
prov:wasDerivedFrom: dbpedia:Croquis http://vocab.getty.edu/aat/300026291
rdf:type: genre:LiteraryGenre skos:Concept
skos:inScheme: genre:LiteraryGenre

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sketch book

"Books or pads of blank sheets used or intended for sketching, which are informal or rough drawings." (Getty, 2017)

Comment: The description for this term is indebted to the Getty Art & Architecture Thesaurus.
This term and its description were created from data gathered from DBpedia.

URI: http://sparql.cwrc.ca/ontologies/genre#sketchbook
Tag: genre:sketchbook
prov:wasDerivedFrom: dbpedia:Sketchbook http://vocab.getty.edu/aat/300027354
rdf:type: genre:LiteraryGenre skos:Concept
skos:inScheme: genre:LiteraryGenre

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slave narrative

"An autobiographical account of the life of an escaped or freed slave. Typically written and published in the Americas and used as a form of protest against the slave trade." (Oxford, 2015)

Comment: This term and its description were created from data gathered from the Oxford Dictionary of Literary Terms, 4th ed.
This term and its description were created from data gathered from DBpedia.

[skos:altLabel: slavery ]

URI: http://sparql.cwrc.ca/ontologies/genre#slaveNarrative
Tag: genre:slaveNarrative
prov:wasDerivedFrom: dbpedia:Slave_narrative http://www.oxfordreference.com/view/10.1093/acref/9780199208272.001.0001/acref-9780199208272-e-1065?rskey=YxMTtm%26result=1061
rdf:type: genre:LiteraryGenre skos:Concept
skos:broaderTransitive: genre:autobiography
skos:inScheme: genre:LiteraryGenre

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social science

Writing dealing with the study of human societies and relationships across several fields of scientific study, including anthropology, political science, and sociology.

URI: http://sparql.cwrc.ca/ontologies/genre#socialScience
Tag: genre:socialScience
rdf:type: genre:LiteraryGenre skos:Concept
skos:broaderTransitive: genre:scholarship
skos:inScheme: genre:LiteraryGenre
skos:narrowerTransitive: genre:criminology

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song

"A lyric poem with a number of repeating stanzas (called refrains), written to be set to music in either vocal performance or with accompaniment of musical instruments." (L. K Wheeler, 2017)

Comment: This term and its description were created from data gathered from DBpedia.
The description for this term is indebted to Dr. L. Kip Wheeler of Carson-Newman University.

URI: http://sparql.cwrc.ca/ontologies/genre#song
Tag: genre:song
prov:wasDerivedFrom: dbpedia:Song http://web.cn.edu/kwheeler/lit_terms_s.html
rdf:type: genre:LiteraryGenre skos:Concept
skos:inScheme: genre:LiteraryGenre
skos:narrowerTransitive: genre:anthem genre:folkSong genre:oratorio

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sonnet

"Poems consisting of 14 decasyllabic lines, often in a rhyming scheme. The sonnet form is considered to be of Italian origin, appearing in the 13th century in Sicily, after which it spread to Tuscany, where Petrarch perfected the form with his Canzioniere, a series of 317 sonnets to his idealized love, Laura. The Petrarchian sonnet has historically been the most widely used of the form, although the Elizabethan form (3 quatrains, with a final rhyming couplet) is also common." (Getty, 2017)

Comment: The description for this term is indebted to the Getty Art & Architecture Thesaurus.
This term and its description were created from data gathered from DBpedia.

URI: http://sparql.cwrc.ca/ontologies/genre#sonnet
Tag: genre:sonnet
prov:wasDerivedFrom: dbpedia:Sonnet http://vocab.getty.edu/aat/300266382
rdf:type: genre:LiteraryGenre skos:Concept
skos:broaderTransitive: genre:poetry
skos:inScheme: genre:LiteraryGenre

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speech

"Documents containing the text of any public address or talk" (Getty, 2017)

Comment: The description for this term is indebted to the Getty Art & Architecture Thesaurus.

URI: http://sparql.cwrc.ca/ontologies/genre#speech
Tag: genre:speech
prov:wasDerivedFrom: http://vocab.getty.edu/aat/300026671
rdf:type: genre:LiteraryGenre skos:Concept
skos:inScheme: genre:LiteraryGenre

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testimony

"Solemn declarations, written or verbal; usually made orally by a witness under oath in response to interrogation by a lawyer or authorized public official, then reduced to writing for the record." (Getty, 2017)

Comment: The description for this term is indebted to the Getty Art & Architecture Thesaurus.

URI: http://sparql.cwrc.ca/ontologies/genre#testimony
Tag: genre:testimony
prov:wasDerivedFrom: http://vocab.getty.edu/aat/300027861
rdf:type: genre:LiteraryGenre skos:Concept
skos:inScheme: genre:LiteraryGenre

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textbook

"Books used as standard works for the formal study of a particular subject." (Getty, 2017)

Comment: This term and its description were created from data gathered from DBpedia.
The description for this term is indebted to the Getty Art & Architecture Thesaurus.

URI: http://sparql.cwrc.ca/ontologies/genre#textbook
Tag: genre:textbook
prov:wasDerivedFrom: dbpedia:Textbook http://vocab.getty.edu/aat/300026384
rdf:type: genre:LiteraryGenre skos:Concept
skos:broaderTransitive: genre:pedagogy
skos:inScheme: genre:LiteraryGenre

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theatre of cruelty

"The Theatre of Cruelty (French: Théâtre de la Cruauté) is a form of theatre developed by avant-garde playwright, actor, essayist, and theorist, Antonin Artaud, in The Theatre and its Double. Originally a member of the surrealist movement, Artaud eventually began to develop his own theatrical theories. The Theatre of Cruelty can be seen as break with traditional Western theatre, and a means by which artists assault the senses of the audience, and allow them to feel the unexpressed emotions of the subconscious. While Artaud was only able to produce one play in his lifetime that reflected the tenets of the Theatre of Cruelty, the works of many theatre artists reflect his theories." (DBpedia, 2017)

Comment: This term and its description were created from data gathered from DBpedia.

URI: http://sparql.cwrc.ca/ontologies/genre#theatreOfCruelty
Tag: genre:theatreOfCruelty
prov:wasDerivedFrom: dbpedia:Theatre_of_Cruelty
rdf:type: genre:LiteraryGenre skos:Concept
skos:broaderTransitive: genre:drama
skos:inScheme: genre:LiteraryGenre

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theatre of the absurd

"The Theatre of the Absurd (French: théâtre de l'absurde) is a post–World War II designation for particular plays of absurdist fiction written by a number of primarily European playwrights in the late 1950s, as well as one for the style of theatre which has evolved from their work. Their work focused largely on the idea of existentialism and expressed what happens when human existence has no meaning or purpose and therefore all communication breaks down, in fact alerting their audiences to pursue the opposite. Logical construction and argument gives way to irrational and illogical speech and to its ultimate conclusion, silence." (DBpedia, 2017)

Comment: This term and its description were created from data gathered from DBpedia.

URI: http://sparql.cwrc.ca/ontologies/genre#theatreOfTheAbsurd
Tag: genre:theatreOfTheAbsurd
prov:wasDerivedFrom: dbpedia:Theatre_of_the_Absurd
rdf:type: genre:LiteraryGenre skos:Concept
skos:broaderTransitive: genre:drama
skos:inScheme: genre:LiteraryGenre

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thematic writing

"Indicates a type of writing associated with some aspect of the text’s content or purpose, broadly conceived." (DBpedia, 2017)

Comment: This term and its description were created from data gathered from DBpedia.

URI: http://sparql.cwrc.ca/ontologies/genre#thematicWriting
Tag: genre:thematicWriting
rdf:type: genre:LiteraryGenre skos:Concept
skos:broaderTransitive: genre:drama
skos:inScheme: genre:LiteraryGenre
skos:narrowerTransitive: genre:didactic genre:domestic genre:gothic genre:industrialNovel genre:lesbian genre:oriental genre:pastoral genre:popular genre:regional

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theology

A branch of religious writing attempting to deal systematically with the study of a deity or deities or religious beliefs; the science of religion.

Comment: This term and its description were created from data gathered from DBpedia.

URI: http://sparql.cwrc.ca/ontologies/genre#theology
Tag: genre:theology
prov:wasDerivedFrom: dbpedia:Theology
rdf:type: genre:LiteraryGenre skos:Concept
skos:broaderTransitive: genre:religious
skos:inScheme: genre:LiteraryGenre

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thesaurus

"A semantic network of unique concepts, including relationships between synonyms, broader and narrower contexts, and other related concepts. Thesauri may be monolingual or multilingual. Thesauri may have the following three relationships between terms: equivalence (synonyms), hierarchical (whole/part), and associative (various types of other relationships)." (Getty, 2017)

Comment: This term and its description were created from data gathered from DBpedia.
This term and its description were created from data gathered from the Getty Art & Architecture Thesaurus.

URI: http://sparql.cwrc.ca/ontologies/genre#thesaurus
Tag: genre:thesaurus
prov:wasDerivedFrom: dbpedia:Thesaurus http://vocab.getty.edu/aat/300026677
rdf:type: genre:LiteraryGenre skos:Concept
skos:broaderTransitive: genre:dictionary
skos:inScheme: genre:LiteraryGenre

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thriller

"Fiction full of action and suspense in which the protagonist is threatened by some sort of danger, often through the actions of a villain or criminal. The protagonist must usually employ both physical skill and wit to escape danger and outsmart the villain." (Oxford, 2015)

Comment: This term and its description were created from data gathered from the Oxford Dictionary of Literary Terms, 4th ed.
This term and its description were created from data gathered from DBpedia.

URI: http://sparql.cwrc.ca/ontologies/genre#thriller
Tag: genre:thriller
prov:wasDerivedFrom: dbpedia:Thriller_(genre) http://www.oxfordreference.com/view/10.1093/acref/9780199208272.001.0001/acref-9780199208272-e-1146?rskey=Bizyon%26result=1151
rdf:type: genre:LiteraryGenre skos:Concept
skos:broaderTransitive: genre:fiction
skos:inScheme: genre:LiteraryGenre

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topographical poetry

"Topographical poetry or loco-descriptive poetry is a genre of poetry that describes, and often praises, a landscape or place. John Denham's 1642 poem "Cooper's Hill" established the genre, which peaked in popularity in 18th-century England. Examples of topographical verse date, however, to the late classical period, and can be found throughout the medieval era and during the Renaissance. Though the earliest examples come mostly from continental Europe, the topographical poetry in the tradition originating with Denham concerns itself with the classics, and many of the various types of topographical verse, such as river, ruin, or hilltop poems were established by the early 17th century. Alexander Pope's "Windsor Forest" (1713) and John Dyer's "Grongar Hill' (1762) are two other oft-mentioned examples. More recently, Matthew Arnold's "The Scholar Gipsy" (1853) praises the Oxfordshire countryside, and W. H. Auden's "In Praise of Limestone" (1948) uses a limestone landscape as an allegory. Subgenres of topographical poetry include the country house poem, written in 17th-century England to compliment a wealthy patron, and the prospect poem, describing the view from a distance or a temporal view into the future, with the sense of opportunity or expectation. When understood broadly as landscape poetry and when assessed from its establishment to the present, topographical poetry can take on many formal situations and types of places. Kenneth Baker identifies 37 varieties and compiles poems from the 16th through the 20th centuries—from Edmund Spenser to Sylvia Plath—correspondent to each type, from "Walks and Surveys," to "Mountains, Hills, and the View from Above," to "Violation of Nature and the Landscape," to "Spirits and Ghosts." Common aesthetic registers of which topographical poetry make use include pastoral imagery, the sublime, and the picturesque. These latter two registers subsume imagery of rivers, ruins, moonlight, birdsong, and clouds, peasants, mountains, caves, and waterscapes." (DBpedia, 2017)

Comment: This term and its description were created from data gathered from data.bnf.
The description for this term is indebted to DBpedia.

URI: http://sparql.cwrc.ca/ontologies/genre#topographicalPoetry
Tag: genre:topographicalPoetry
prov:wasDerivedFrom: http://data.bnf.fr/11978314/poesie_des_lieux/ dbpedia:Topographical_poetry
rdf:type: genre:LiteraryGenre skos:Concept
skos:broaderTransitive: genre:poetry
skos:inScheme: genre:LiteraryGenre

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tract pamphlet

"Writing printed on a single sheet of paper or in a small booklet, designed to be distributed to the public. The subject matter is typically religious or political, and aims to persuade the reader of a certain point of view." (Getty, 2017)

Comment: This term and its description were created from data gathered from DBpedia.
This term and its description were created from data gathered from the Getty Art & Architecture Thesaurus.

URI: http://sparql.cwrc.ca/ontologies/genre#tractPamphlet
Tag: genre:tractPamphlet
prov:wasDerivedFrom: dbpedia:Flyer_(pamphlet) http://vocab.getty.edu/aat/300027211 http://vocab.getty.edu/aat/300220572
rdf:type: genre:LiteraryGenre skos:Concept
skos:broaderTransitive: genre:politicalWriting
skos:inScheme: genre:LiteraryGenre

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tragedy

"Literary works of serious and dignified character that reach disastrous or sorrowful conclusions." (Getty, 2017)

Comment: The description for this term is indebted to DBpedia.
The description for this term is indebted to the Getty Art & Architecture Thesaurus.

URI: http://sparql.cwrc.ca/ontologies/genre#tragedy
Tag: genre:tragedy
prov:wasDerivedFrom: dbpedia:Tragedy http://vocab.getty.edu/aat/300201026
rdf:type: genre:LiteraryGenre skos:Concept
skos:broaderTransitive: genre:drama
skos:inScheme: genre:LiteraryGenre

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tragicomedy

1- "A experimental literary work--either a play or prose piece of fiction--containing elements common to both comedies and tragedies. The genre is marked by characters of both high and low degree, even though classical drama required upper-class characters for tragedy and lower-class characters for comedy. Tragicomedies were of some interest in the Renaissance, but some modern dramas might be considered examples as well. Typically, the early stages of the play resembled those of a tragedy, but an abrupt reversal of circumstance prevent the tragedy." (L. K Wheeler, 2017)

2- "Tragicomedy is a literary genre that blends aspects of both tragic and comic forms. Most often seen in dramatic literature, the term can variously describe either a tragic play which contains enough comic elements to lighten the overall mood or a serious play with a happy ending." (DBpedia, 2017)

Comment: The description for this term is indebted to Dr. L. Kip Wheeler of Carson-Newman University.
The description for this term is indebted to DBpedia.

URI: http://sparql.cwrc.ca/ontologies/genre#tragicomedy
Tag: genre:tragicomedy
prov:wasDerivedFrom: dbpedia:Tragicomedy http://web.cn.edu/kwheeler/lit_terms_t.html
rdf:type: genre:LiteraryGenre skos:Concept
skos:broaderTransitive: genre:drama
skos:inScheme: genre:LiteraryGenre

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translation

1- "The act of conveying the meaning of words in one language by attempting to say the same thing in another language, as opposed to paraphrasing, summarizing, and transliteration." (L. K Wheeler, 2017)

2- Translated versions of a text.

Comment: The description for this term is indebted to the Getty Art & Architecture Thesaurus.
The description for this term is indebted to Dr. L. Kip Wheeler of Carson-Newman University.

URI: http://sparql.cwrc.ca/ontologies/genre#translation
Tag: genre:translation
prov:wasDerivedFrom: http://vocab.getty.edu/aat/300027389 http://web.cn.edu/kwheeler/lit_terms_t.html
rdf:type: genre:LiteraryGenre skos:Concept
skos:inScheme: genre:LiteraryGenre

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travel writing

Writing about time spent abroad, typically containing descriptions of the scenery and culture of places visited. Sometimes includes biographical content, such as travel literature written in the form of a personal journal or diary.

Comment: This term and its description were created from data gathered from Wikipedia.

URI: http://sparql.cwrc.ca/ontologies/genre#travelWriting
Tag: genre:travelWriting
prov:wasDerivedFrom: https://fr.wikipedia.org/wiki/R%C3%A9cit_de_voyage
rdf:type: genre:LiteraryGenre skos:Concept
skos:broaderTransitive: genre:informationalWriting
skos:inScheme: genre:LiteraryGenre

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treatise

"Formal and systematic written expositions of the principles of a subject, generally longer and more detailed than essays." (Getty, 2017)

Comment: The description for this term is indebted to DBpedia.
The description for this term is indebted to the Getty Art & Architecture Thesaurus.

URI: http://sparql.cwrc.ca/ontologies/genre#treatise
Tag: genre:treatise
prov:wasDerivedFrom: dbpedia:Treatise http://vocab.getty.edu/aat/300026681
rdf:type: genre:LiteraryGenre skos:Concept
skos:inScheme: genre:LiteraryGenre

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utopia

"An imaginary place or government in which political and social perfection has been reached in the material world as opposed to some spiritual afterlife as discussed in the Christian Bible or the Elysian fields of The Odyssey. The citizens of such utopias are typically universally clean, virtuous, healthy, and happy, or at least those who are criminals are always captured and appropriately punished. A utopian society is one that has cured all social ills. See discussion under Utopian literature, below. Contrast with dystopia. UTOPIAN" (L. K Wheeler, 2017)

Comment: This term and its description were created from data gathered from DBpedia.
The description for this term is indebted to Dr. L. Kip Wheeler of Carson-Newman University.

URI: http://sparql.cwrc.ca/ontologies/genre#utopia
Tag: genre:utopia
cwrc:contraryTo: genre:dystopia
prov:wasDerivedFrom: dbpedia:Utopia http://web.cn.edu/kwheeler/lit_terms_u.html
rdf:type: genre:LiteraryGenre skos:Concept
skos:broaderTransitive: genre:fiction
skos:inScheme: genre:LiteraryGenre

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verse novel

"A verse novel is a type of narrative poetry in which a novel-length narrative is told through the medium of poetry rather than prose. Either simple or complex stanzaic verse-forms may be used, but there will usually be a large cast, multiple voices, dialogue, narration, description, and action in a novelistic manner." (DBpedia, 2017)

Comment: The description for this term is indebted to DBpedia.

URI: http://sparql.cwrc.ca/ontologies/genre#verseNovel
Tag: genre:verseNovel
prov:wasDerivedFrom: dbpedia:Verse_novel
rdf:type: genre:LiteraryGenre skos:Concept
skos:broaderTransitive: genre:fiction genre:novel genre:poetry
skos:inScheme: genre:LiteraryGenre

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vignette

"In theatrical script writing, sketch stories, and poetry, a vignette is a short impressionistic scene that focuses on one moment or gives a trenchant impression about a character, idea, setting, or object.[citation needed] This type of scene is more common in recent postmodern theater, where less emphasis is placed on adhering to the conventions of theatrical structure and story development. Vignettes have been particularly influenced by contemporary notions of a scene as shown in film, video and television scripting. It is also a part of something bigger than itself: for example, a vignette about a house belonging to a collection of vignettes or a whole story, such as The House On Mango Street, by Sandra Cisneros. A blog can provide a form of vignette." (DBpedia, 2017)

Comment: This term and its description were created from data gathered from DBpedia.
The description for this term is indebted to DBpedia.

URI: http://sparql.cwrc.ca/ontologies/genre#vignette
Tag: genre:vignette
prov:wasDerivedFrom: dbpedia:Vignette_(literature)
rdf:type: genre:LiteraryGenre skos:Concept
skos:inScheme: genre:LiteraryGenre

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villanelle

"A versatile genre of poetry consisting of nineteen lines--five tercets and a concluding quatrain. The form requires that whole lines be repeated in a specific order, and that only two rhyming sounds occur in the course of the poem. A number of English poets, including Oscar Wilde, W. E. Henley, and W. H. Auden have experimented with it. Here is an example of an opening stanza to one poem by W. E. Henley: Probably the most famous English villanelle is Dylan Thomas's "Do Not Go Gentle Into That Good Night." (L. K Wheeler, 2017)

Comment: This term and its description were created from data gathered from DBpedia.
The description for this term is indebted to Dr. L. Kip Wheeler of Carson-Newman University.

URI: http://sparql.cwrc.ca/ontologies/genre#villanelle
Tag: genre:villanelle
prov:wasDerivedFrom: dbpedia:Villanelle http://web.cn.edu/kwheeler/lit_terms_v.html
rdf:type: genre:LiteraryGenre skos:Concept
skos:broaderTransitive: genre:poetry
skos:inScheme: genre:LiteraryGenre

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young adult writing

Writing aimed at a young adult audience.

[skos:altLabel: young adult ]

URI: http://sparql.cwrc.ca/ontologies/genre#youngAdultWriting
Tag: genre:youngAdultWriting
rdf:type: genre:LiteraryGenre skos:Concept
skos:broaderTransitive: genre:childrensLiterature
skos:inScheme: genre:LiteraryGenre

3. Deprecated Terms

Global Cross Reference of Deprecated Terms

Deprecated Terms:
genreAbridgement, genreAclef, genreAcrostic, genreAdaptation, genreAdventurewriting, genreAdvertisingcopy, genreAfterpiece, genreAfterword, genreAgitprop, genreAllegory, genreAnagram, genreAnnotation, genreAnswer, genreAnthem, genreAnthology, genreAntiromance, genreAphorism, genreApology, genreArtcriticism, genreAutobiography, genreBallade, genreBalladopera, genreBallet, genreBergamasque, genreBestiary, genreBiblicalparaphrase, genreBildungsroman, genreBiographicaldictionary, genreBiography, genreBisexualfiction, genreBlackcomedy, genreBoutsrimes, genreBroadside, genreBurletta, genreCabaret, genreCaptivitynarrative, genreCatechism, genreChapbook, genreCharacter, genreCharade, genreChildrensLiterature, genreClerihew, genreClosetdrama, genreColouringbook, genreComedy, genreComedyofintrigue, genreComedyofmanners, genreComedyofmenace, genreComicbook, genreComingout, genreCommonplacebook, genreCompanion, genreComputerprogram, genreConditionofenglandnovel, genreConductliterature, genreCookbook, genreCourtshipfiction, genreCriminology, genreDedication, genreDetective, genreDevotional, genreDialogueofthedead, genreDialogueordebate, genreDiary, genreDictionary, genreDidactic, genreDirectory, genreDissertation, genreDocumentary, genreDomestic, genreDrama, genreDramaticmonologue, genreDreamvision, genreDystopia, genreEclogue, genreElegy, genreEncyclopaedia, genreEpic, genreEpigram, genreEpilogue, genreEpistle, genreEpistolary, genreEpitaph, genreEpithalamium, genreEpyllion, genreEroticapornography, genreEssay, genreEulogy, genreExhibitioncatalogue, genreFable, genreFabliau, genreFairytale, genreFantasy, genreFarce, genreFeminist, genreFeministtheory, genreFiction, genreFilmtvscript, genreFolksong, genreGardeningbook, genreGenealogy, genreGeorgic, genreGhoststory, genreGiftbook, genreGothic, genreGovernmentreport, genreGrammar, genreGraveyardpoetry, genreGuidebook, genreHagiography, genreHaiku, genreHarlequinade, genreHeroic, genreHistorical, genreHistory, genreHymn, genreImitation, genreIndustrialnovel, genreIntroduction, genreJournalism, genreJuvenilia, genreKitchensinkdrama, genreKunstlerroman, genreLais, genreLampoon, genreLegalwriting, genreLegendFolktale, genreLesbian, genreLetter, genreLettersfromthedeadtotheliving, genreLibretto, genreLiteraryCriticism, genreLiturgy, genreLove, genreLyric, genreMagicrealist, genreManifesto, genreManual, genreMap, genreMasque, genreMedicalwriting, genreMelodrama, genreMixedmedia, genreMockforms, genreMonologue, genreMoralitymysteryplay, genreMultimedia, genreMusicology, genreMystery, genreMyth, genreNarrativepoetry, genreNationaltale, genreNotebook, genreNovel, genreNovella, genreNurseryrhyme, genreObituary, genreOccasionalpoetry, genreOde, genreOneactplay, genreOpera, genreOratorio, genreOriental, genrePageant, genrePanegyric, genrePantomime, genreParable, genreParatexts, genreParody, genrePastoral, genrePedagogy, genrePerformancepoetry, genrePeriodical, genrePetition, genrePhilosophical, genrePhilosophy, genrePicaresque, genrePindaric, genrePoetry, genrePolemic, genrePoliticalwriting, genrePopular, genrePrayer, genrePrefatorypiece, genreProletarianwriting, genrePrologue, genrePropaganda, genreProphecy, genrePsalm, genrePsychoanalytical, genreQuiz, genreRadiodrama, genreRealist, genreRegional, genreReligious, genreReview, genreRevue, genreRiddle, genreRomance, genreSagewriting, genreSatire, genreScholarship, genreSchoolfiction, genreSciencefiction, genreScientificwriting, genreScrapbook, genreSensationnovel, genreSentimental, genreSequel, genreSermon, genreSexualawakeningfiction, genreShortstory, genreSilverforknovel, genreSketch, genreSketchbook, genreSlavenarrative, genreSocialscience, genreSong, genreSonnet, genreSpeech, genreTestimony, genreTextbook, genreTheatreofcruelty, genreTheatreoftheabsurd, genreTheology, genreThesaurus, genreThriller, genreTopographicalpoetry, genreTractpamphlet, genreTragedy, genreTragicomedy, genreTranslation, genreTravelwriting, genreTreatise, genreUtopia, genreVersenovel, genreVignette, genreVillanelle, genreYoungadultwriting,

Terms and details

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genre:genreAbridgement

URI: http://sparql.cwrc.ca/ontologies/genre#genreAbridgement

abridgement

"Versions of written works produced by condensation and omission but with retention of the general meaning and manner of presentation of the original, often prepared by someone other than the author of the original." (Getty, 2017)

Comment: Deprecated in favour of instance abridgement.

Replaced by: genre:abridgement

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genre:genreAclef

URI: http://sparql.cwrc.ca/ontologies/genre#genreAclef

à clef

"A novel in which the characters and plots are fictionalized, but can actually be recognized as real people and events in disguise. French for "novel with a key." (DBpedia, 2017)

Comment: Deprecated in favour of instance [http://sparql.cwrc.ca/ontologies/genre#àClef].

Replaced by: genre:àClef

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genre:genreAcrostic

URI: http://sparql.cwrc.ca/ontologies/genre#genreAcrostic

acrostic

"Short poems or prose compositions in which text is arranged so that the first letters of each line form a word, phrase, or motto." (Getty, 2017)

Comment: The description for this term is indebted to the Getty Art & Architecture Thesaurus.

Replaced by: genre:acrostic

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genre:genreAdaptation

URI: http://sparql.cwrc.ca/ontologies/genre#genreAdaptation

adaptation

Written works or works derived from written works, where the second work is an alteration or amendment a text to make it suitable for another purpose. An example of an adaptation is a version of an earlier text made to better agree with a philosophy other than that intended by the original. Other examples are written works adapted for another medium, such as film, broadcasting, or stage production. For visual works adapted from another work, use "adaptations (derivative objects)."

Comment: The description for this term is indebted to the Getty Art & Architecture Thesaurus.

Replaced by: genre:adaptation

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genre:genreAdventurewriting

URI: http://sparql.cwrc.ca/ontologies/genre#genreAdventurewriting

adventure writing

"Action-filled fiction in which a protagonist is removed from her or his ordinary life to undertake some sort of journey or quest. Along the way, the protagonist is exposed to extraordinary events and physical dangers that put his or her virtues, such as bravery, to the test." (Oxford, 2015)

Comment: This term and its description were created from data gathered from the Oxford Dictionary of Literary Terms, 4th ed.

Replaced by: genre:adventureWriting

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genre:genreAdvertisingcopy

URI: http://sparql.cwrc.ca/ontologies/genre#genreAdvertisingcopy

advertising copy

"The text of an advertisement for any type of medium. Typically short, and full of attention-grabbing, persuasive language that aims to quickly convince a consumer to make a purchase." (WebFinance Inc., 2017)

Comment: This term and its description were created from data gathered from DBpedia.

Replaced by: genre:advertisingCopy

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genre:genreAfterpiece

URI: http://sparql.cwrc.ca/ontologies/genre#genreAfterpiece

afterpiece

"A short drama performed after a main play, popularized in the 1700s as justification for a new half-price entrance fee charged to latecomers. Typically a comedic one-act, regardless of the genre of the preceding play." (Penguin, 1999)

Comment: Deprecated in favour of instance afterpiece.

Replaced by: genre:afterpiece

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genre:genreAfterword

URI: http://sparql.cwrc.ca/ontologies/genre#genreAfterword

afterword

"A section that appears towards the end of a book, does not form part of the main body, and often concludes or summarizes." (Oxford, 2015)

Comment: Deprecated in favour of instance afterword.

Replaced by: genre:afterword

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genre:genreAgitprop

URI: http://sparql.cwrc.ca/ontologies/genre#genreAgitprop

agitprop

"Derived from agitation propaganda, meaning intended to inspire political action. With reference to visual art, refers to the specific art movement arising in Soviet Russia following the Bolshevik revolution." (Getty, 2017)

Comment: Deprecated in favour of instance agitprop.

Replaced by: genre:agitprop

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genre:genreAllegory

URI: http://sparql.cwrc.ca/ontologies/genre#genreAllegory

allegory

"Literary works, art works, or other creative works that employ allegory to express complex abstract ideas, for example works that employ symbolic, fictional figures and actions to express truths or generalizations about human conduct or experience." (Getty, 2017)

Comment: The description for this term is indebted to the Getty Art & Architecture Thesaurus.

Replaced by: genre:allegory

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genre:genreAnagram

URI: http://sparql.cwrc.ca/ontologies/genre#genreAnagram

anagram

"Words or phrases made by transposing the letters of other words or phrases." (Getty, 2017)

Comment: The description for this term is indebted to the Getty Art & Architecture Thesaurus.

Replaced by: genre:anagram

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genre:genreAnnotation

URI: http://sparql.cwrc.ca/ontologies/genre#genreAnnotation

annotation

"Notes added as comment or explanation, such as those accompanying an entry in a bibliography, reading list, or catalogue intended to describe, explain, or evaluate the publication referred to." (Getty, 2017)

Comment: Deprecated in favour of instance annotation.

Replaced by: genre:annotation

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genre:genreAnswer

URI: http://sparql.cwrc.ca/ontologies/genre#genreAnswer

answer

A form of intertextuality in which an author writes a response to a work by another writer, typically to argue against the statements of that work. Often takes the form of an essay or letter.

Comment: Deprecated in favour of instance answer.

Replaced by: genre:answer

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genre:genreAnthem

URI: http://sparql.cwrc.ca/ontologies/genre#genreAnthem

anthem

"A song in which the lyrics promote pride in and allegiance to the identity and values of a particular group, such as a nation, sports team, or social cause." (Oxford, 2015)

Comment: Deprecated in favour of instance anthem.

Replaced by: genre:anthem

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genre:genreAnthology

URI: http://sparql.cwrc.ca/ontologies/genre#genreAnthology

anthology

"Collections of choice extracts, from the writings of one author, or various authors, and usually having a common characteristic such as subject matter or literary form." (Getty, 2017)

Comment: The description for this term is indebted to the Getty Art & Architecture Thesaurus.

Replaced by: genre:anthology

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genre:genreAntiromance

URI: http://sparql.cwrc.ca/ontologies/genre#genreAntiromance

anti-romance

A text that rejects in some way the form of the romance novel. Often linked to satirical and picaresque novels.

Comment: Deprecated in favour of instance anti-romance.

Replaced by: genre:antiRomance

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genre:genreAphorism

URI: http://sparql.cwrc.ca/ontologies/genre#genreAphorism

aphorism

"Short, pithy statements of principle or precepts, often of known authorship; distinguished from "proverbs" which are statements repeated colloquially and which often embody the folk wisdom of a group or nation." (Getty, 2017)

Comment: Deprecated in favour of instance aphorism.

Replaced by: genre:aphorism

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genre:genreApology

URI: http://sparql.cwrc.ca/ontologies/genre#genreApology

apology

"A text in which a writer defends the possibly controversial opinions contained in his or her writing." (Oxford, 2015)

Comment: This term and its description were created from data gathered from DBpedia.

Replaced by: genre:apology

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genre:genreArtcriticism

URI: http://sparql.cwrc.ca/ontologies/genre#genreArtcriticism

art criticism

"The study or practice of the analytical description, interpretation, and evaluation of visual art works and exhibitions." (Getty, 2017)

Comment: This term and its description were created from data gathered from the Getty Art & Architecture Thesaurus.

Replaced by: genre:artCriticism

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genre:genreAutobiography

URI: http://sparql.cwrc.ca/ontologies/genre#genreAutobiography

autobiography

"Documents of any type that are biographies of individuals written by themselves. For the overall genre, use "autobiography (genre).""(Getty, 2017)

Comment: The description for this term is indebted to the Getty Art & Architecture Thesaurus.

Replaced by: genre:autobiography

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genre:genreBallade

URI: http://sparql.cwrc.ca/ontologies/genre#genreBallade

ballade

"A ballade (from French ballade, [baˈlad], and German Ballade, [baˈlaːdə], both being words for "ballad"), in classical music since the late 18th century, refers to a setting of a literary ballad, a narrative poem, in the musical tradition of the Lied, or to a one-movement instrumental piece with lyrical and dramatic narrative qualities reminiscent of such a song setting, especially a piano ballad." (DBpedia, 2017)

Comment: This term and its description were created from data gathered from DBpedia.

Replaced by: genre:ballade

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genre:genreBalladopera

URI: http://sparql.cwrc.ca/ontologies/genre#genreBalladopera

ballad opera

"A drama combining song and spoken dialogue, popularized in the 1700s by John Gay’s The Beggar’s Opera. It can be seen as a precursor to the modern musical." (Penguin, 1999)

Comment: Deprecated in favour of instance ballad opera.

Replaced by: genre:balladOpera

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genre:genreBallet

URI: http://sparql.cwrc.ca/ontologies/genre#genreBallet

ballet

"Dramatic entertainments consisting of dance and mime performed to music. Ballets are characterized by stylized poses and steps that are combined with light and flowing figures and movements, such as leaps and turns; often combined with music, scenery, costume, and sometimes pantomime or speech to convey a story, theme, or atmosphere to the audience." (Getty, 2017)

Comment: This term and its description were created from data gathered from DBpedia.

Replaced by: genre:ballet

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genre:genreBergamasque

URI: http://sparql.cwrc.ca/ontologies/genre#genreBergamasque

bergamasque

"A folk dance originating in Bergamo, Italy, in the 16th century, but often included in theatre productions unrelated to Italian culture." (Merriam-Webster, 2017)

Comment: Deprecated in favour of instance bergamasque.

Replaced by: genre:bergamasque

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genre:genreBestiary

URI: http://sparql.cwrc.ca/ontologies/genre#genreBestiary

bestiary

"Collections of moralized fables, especially as written in the Middle Ages, about actual or mythical animals." (Getty, 2017)

Comment: Deprecated in favour of instance bestiary.

Replaced by: genre:bestiary

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genre:genreBiblicalparaphrase

URI: http://sparql.cwrc.ca/ontologies/genre#genreBiblicalparaphrase

biblical paraphrase

A work that rewords the text of the Bible, often to improve clarity or to make it accessible to a wider audience.

Comment: Deprecated in favour of instance biblical paraphrase.

Replaced by: genre:biblicalParaphrase

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genre:genreBildungsroman

URI: http://sparql.cwrc.ca/ontologies/genre#genreBildungsroman

bildungsroman

"Novels of a traditional German genre that focuses on the spiritual development or formative years of an individual. Now in broad use to refer to this type of novel written in any language or in any culture." (Getty, 2017)

Comment: The description for this term is indebted to the Getty Art & Architecture Thesaurus.

Replaced by: genre:bildungsroman

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genre:genreBiographicaldictionary

URI: http://sparql.cwrc.ca/ontologies/genre#genreBiographicaldictionary

biographical dictionary

A reference text containing biographical entries on multiple people, often with a common link between them (for example, a biographical dictionary of women), and typically arranged alphabetically.

Comment: Deprecated in favour of instance biographical dictionary.

Replaced by: genre:biographicalDictionary

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genre:genreBiography

URI: http://sparql.cwrc.ca/ontologies/genre#genreBiography

biography

"The genre of nonfiction that concerns accounts of the lives of individuals. For examples of this genre, prefer "biographies (documents)." (Getty, 2017)

Comment: Deprecated in favour of instance biography.

Replaced by: genre:biography

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genre:genreBisexualfiction

URI: http://sparql.cwrc.ca/ontologies/genre#genreBisexualfiction

bisexual fiction

Fiction dealing with bisexuality.

Comment: Deprecated in favour of instance bisexual fiction.

Replaced by: genre:bisexualFiction

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genre:genreBlackcomedy

URI: http://sparql.cwrc.ca/ontologies/genre#genreBlackcomedy

black comedy

"A black comedy (or dark comedy) is a comic work that employs morbid humor, which, in its simplest form, is humor that makes light of subject matter usually considered taboo. Black humor corresponds to the earlier concept of gallows humor. Black comedy is often controversial due to its subject matter." (DBpedia, 2017)

Comment: Deprecated in favour of instance black comedy.

Replaced by: genre:blackComedy

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genre:genreBoutsrimes

URI: http://sparql.cwrc.ca/ontologies/genre#genreBoutsrimes

bouts-rimés

"The result of a game popularized in 17th-century France in which a poet must write a logical poem using a list of random rhyming words written by someone else." (Oxford, 2015)

Comment: Deprecated in favour of instance bouts-rimés.

Replaced by: genre:boutsRimés

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genre:genreBroadside

URI: http://sparql.cwrc.ca/ontologies/genre#genreBroadside

broadside

"Large sheets of paper with a poem or song, especially a ballad, printed on only one side." (Oxford, 2015)

Comment: Deprecated in favour of instance broadside.

Replaced by: genre:broadside

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genre:genreBurletta

URI: http://sparql.cwrc.ca/ontologies/genre#genreBurletta

burletta

"A form of comic drama set to music, first popularized in the 1700s." (Penguin, 1999)

Comment: Deprecated in favour of instance burletta.

Replaced by: genre:burletta

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genre:genreCabaret

URI: http://sparql.cwrc.ca/ontologies/genre#genreCabaret

cabaret

"Various forms of entertainment, often involving dancing, singing, or comedy acts, performed at a venue such as a nightclub in which the audience is seated at tables. Live music played in restaurants or public houses would not usually be considered cabaret without an additional component." (Oxford, 2015)

Comment: Deprecated in favour of instance cabaret.

Replaced by: genre:cabaret

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genre:genreCaptivitynarrative

URI: http://sparql.cwrc.ca/ontologies/genre#genreCaptivitynarrative

captivity narrative

"Captivity narratives are usually stories of people captured by enemies whom they consider uncivilized, or whose beliefs and customs they oppose. The best-known captivity narratives are those concerning the indigenous peoples of North America. These narratives (and questions about their accuracy) have an enduring place in literature, history, ethnography, and the study of Native peoples. However, captivity narratives have also come to play a major role in the study of contemporary religious movements, thanks to scholars of religion like David G. Bromley and James R. Lewis. In this article, both main types of captivity narratives are considered. Traditionally, historians have made limited use of certain captivity narratives. They have regarded the genre with suspicion because of its ideological underpinnings. As a result of new scholarly approaches, historians with a more certain grasp of Native American cultures are distinguishing between plausible statements of fact and value-laden judgements in order to study the narratives as rare sources from "inside" Native societies. Contemporary historians such as Linda Colley and anthropologists such as Pauline Turner Strong have also found the narratives useful in analyzing how the colonists constructed the "other", as well as what the narratives reveal about the settlers' sense of themselves and their culture, and the experience of crossing the line to another. Colley has studied the long history of English captivity in other cultures, both the Barbary pirate captives who preceded those in North America, and British captives in cultures such as India, after the North American experience. Certain North American captivity narratives involving Native peoples were published from the 18th through the 19th centuries, but they reflected a well-established genre in English literature. There had already been English accounts of captivity by Barbary pirates, or in the Middle East, which established some of the major elements of the form. Following the American experience, additional accounts were written after British people were captured during exploration and settlement in India and East Asia. Other types of captivity narratives, such as those recounted by apostates from religious movements (i.e. "cult survivor" tales), have remained an enduring feature of modern media, and currently appear in books, periodicals, film, and television. The unifying factor in most captivity narratives, whether they stem from geopolitical or religious conflicts, is that the captive portrays the captors' way of life as alien, undesirable, and incompatible with the captive's own (typically dominant) culture. This underscores the utility of captivity narratives in garnering support for social control measures, such as removing Native Americans to "reservations", or stigmatizing participation in religious movements – whether Catholicism in the nineteenth century, or ISKCON in the twentieth. Captivity narratives tend to be culturally chauvinistic, viewing an "alien" culture through the lens of the narrator's preferred culture, thus making (possibly unfair) value judgements like "Puritans good, Indians bad." (DBpedia, 2017)

Comment: The description for this term is indebted to DBpedia.

Replaced by: genre:captivityNarrative

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genre:genreCatechism

URI: http://sparql.cwrc.ca/ontologies/genre#genreCatechism

catechism

"Manuals or guides for instructing through a series of questions and answers, especially for religious instruction." (Getty, 2017)

Comment: The description for this term is indebted to the Getty Art & Architecture Thesaurus.

Replaced by: genre:catechism

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genre:genreChapbook

URI: http://sparql.cwrc.ca/ontologies/genre#genreChapbook

chapbook

"Small books or pamphlets, usually cheaply printed and containing such texts as popular tales, treatises, ballads, or nursery rhymes, formerly peddled by chapmen." (Getty, 2017)

Comment: Deprecated in favour of instance chapbook.

Replaced by: genre:chapbook

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genre:genreCharacter

URI: http://sparql.cwrc.ca/ontologies/genre#genreCharacter

character

"Any representation of an individual being presented in a dramatic or narrative work through extended dramatic or verbal representation. The reader can interpret characters as endowed with moral and dispositional qualities expressed in what they say (dialogue) and what they do (action)." (L. K Wheeler, 2017)

Comment: Deprecated in favour of instance character sketch.

Replaced by: genre:character

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genre:genreCharade

URI: http://sparql.cwrc.ca/ontologies/genre#genreCharade

charade

"A form of riddle in which clues are given about each syllable of a word so that the entire word may be guessed. Originally, these riddles were written, often in the form of a poem, but it soon gained popularity as a parlour game in which the clues were mimed rather than written in verse." (Encyclopædia Britannica, 2017)

Comment: This term and its description were created from data gathered from the DVLF (Dictionnaire Vivant de la Langue Française).

Replaced by: genre:charade

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genre:genreChildrensLiterature

URI: http://sparql.cwrc.ca/ontologies/genre#genreChildrensLiterature

childrens literature

"Literature written and published for children." (Getty, 2017)

Comment: Deprecated in favour of instance childrens literature.

Replaced by: genre:childrensLiterature

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genre:genreClerihew

URI: http://sparql.cwrc.ca/ontologies/genre#genreClerihew

clerihew

"A clerihew is a whimsical, four-line biographical poem invented by Edmund Clerihew Bentley. The first line is the name of the poem's subject, usually a famous person put in an absurd light. The rhyme scheme is AABB, and the rhymes are often forced. The line length and metre are irregular. Bentley invented the clerihew in school and then popularized it in books." (DBpedia, 2017)

Comment: Deprecated in favour of instance clerihew.

Replaced by: genre:clerihew

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genre:genreClosetdrama

URI: http://sparql.cwrc.ca/ontologies/genre#genreClosetdrama

closet drama

"A drama, often written in verse and frequently with extensive stage directions, that is meant to be read in private rather than performed for an audience." (Oxford, 2015)

Comment: Deprecated in favour of instance closet drama.

Replaced by: genre:closetDrama

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genre:genreColouringbook

URI: http://sparql.cwrc.ca/ontologies/genre#genreColouringbook

colouring book

"Books containing outline drawings, for coloring in with crayons, watercolor, colored pencils, or other media, usually intended for use by children." (Getty, 2017)

Comment: The description for this term is indebted to the Getty Art & Architecture Thesaurus.

Replaced by: genre:colouringBook

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genre:genreComedy

URI: http://sparql.cwrc.ca/ontologies/genre#genreComedy

comedy

"Genre encompassing forms of theatre, literature, and improvisation with the basic objective to amuse, humor, and induce laughter. In general, it is often contrasted with tragedy and can be applied in the form of social criticism through satire and political or intellectual wit or applied in the form of pure spectacle through farce or burlesque." (Getty, 2017)

Comment: Deprecated in favour of instance comedy.

Replaced by: genre:comedy

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genre:genreComedyofintrigue

URI: http://sparql.cwrc.ca/ontologies/genre#genreComedyofintrigue

comedy of intrigue

"A dramatic form popularized in the 16th century in which the comedy depends on complex plots, surprising twists, and ridiculous situations. The characters and their development tend to be secondary to plot in importance." (Penguin, 1999)

Comment: Deprecated in favour of instance comedy of intrigue.

Replaced by: genre:comedyOfIntrigue

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genre:genreComedyofmanners

URI: http://sparql.cwrc.ca/ontologies/genre#genreComedyofmanners

comedy of manners

"The comedy of manners is an entertainment form which satirizes the manners and affectations of a social class or of multiple classes, often represented by stereotypical stock characters. For example, the miles gloriosus ("boastful soldier") in ancient times, the fop and the rake during the English Restoration, or an old person pretending to be young. Restoration comedy is used as a synonym for "comedy of manners". The plot of the comedy, often concerned with scandal, is generally less important than its witty dialogue. A great writer of comedies of manners was Oscar Wilde, his most famous play being The Importance of Being Earnest. The comedy of manners was first developed in the new comedy of the Ancient Greek playwright Menander. His style, elaborate plots, and stock characters were imitated by the Roman playwrights Plautus and Terence, whose comedies were widely known and copied during the Renaissance. The best-known comedies of manners, however, may well be those of the French playwright Molière, who satirized the hypocrisy and pretension of the ancien régime in such plays as L'École des femmes (The School for Wives, 1662), Le Misanthrope (The Misanthrope, 1666), and most famously Tartuffe (1664)." (DBpedia, 2017)

Comment: Deprecated in favour of instance comedy of manners.

Replaced by: genre:comedyOfManners

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genre:genreComedyofmenace

URI: http://sparql.cwrc.ca/ontologies/genre#genreComedyofmenace

comedy of menace

"A type of comedic drama in which the dark humour stems from the main characters’ fear, irrational or not, that some dark force threatens them." (Penguin, 1999)

Comment: Deprecated in favour of instance comedy of menace.

Replaced by: genre:comedyOfMenace

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genre:genreComicbook

URI: http://sparql.cwrc.ca/ontologies/genre#genreComicbook

comicbook

"Sequence of illustrations containing a story or stories (called "comics," because some are humorous), often serialized, published in booklet form." (Getty, 2017)

Comment: Deprecated in favour of instance comicbook.

Replaced by: genre:comicbook

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genre:genreComingout

URI: http://sparql.cwrc.ca/ontologies/genre#genreComingout

coming out

Pertaining to the process of coming out sexually.

Comment: Deprecated in favour of instance coming out.

Replaced by: genre:autobiography

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genre:genreCommonplacebook

URI: http://sparql.cwrc.ca/ontologies/genre#genreCommonplacebook

common place book

"Books in which noteworthy literary passages, cogent quotations, poems, comments, recipes, prescriptions, and other miscellaneous document types are written." (Getty, 2017)

Comment: Deprecated in favour of instance common place book.

Replaced by: genre:commonPlaceBook

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genre:genreCompanion

URI: http://sparql.cwrc.ca/ontologies/genre#genreCompanion

companion

An authoritative and often academic handbook or collection providing a guide to and overview of a subject field, composed of short entries or longer essays, and generally encycopedic in scope or structure.

Comment: Deprecated in favour of instance companion.

Replaced by: genre:companion

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genre:genreComputerprogram

URI: http://sparql.cwrc.ca/ontologies/genre#genreComputerprogram

computer program

"A compilation of coded instructions or sequence of code that, when run, achieves a certain task in a mechanism, usually a computer." (Getty, 2017)

Comment: Deprecated in favour of instance computer program.

Replaced by: genre:computerProgram

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genre:genreConditionofenglandnovel

URI: http://sparql.cwrc.ca/ontologies/genre#genreConditionofenglandnovel

condition of england novel

A form of narrative fiction, named for a phrase from Thomas Carlyle's “Chartism” (1839), that addresses Victorian social and political issues with a focus on political unrest and class conflict, and typically seeks to instill empathy for the poor and understanding of social iniquities and injustices. Closely related to the industrial novel because of its interest in the impact of the industrial revolution.

Comment: Deprecated in favour of instance condition of england novel.

Replaced by: genre:conditionOfEnglandNovel

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genre:genreConductliterature

URI: http://sparql.cwrc.ca/ontologies/genre#genreConductliterature

conduct literature

"Prescriptive literature, usually directed to a specific gender, that outlines the rules of appropriate behaviour according to the gender roles and societal norms prevalent at the time of writing. Conduct books became very popular in the 18th century." (Penguin, 1999)

Comment: Deprecated in favour of instance conduct literature.

Replaced by: genre:conductLiterature

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genre:genreCookbook

URI: http://sparql.cwrc.ca/ontologies/genre#genreCookbook

cookbook

"Reference publications containing collections of recipes with ancillary content on selection of ingredients or the broader context of the types of cooking presented. Contemporary cookbooks may focus on cultural or regional themes." (Getty, 2017)

Comment: Deprecated in favour of instance cookbook.

Replaced by: genre:cookbook

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genre:genreCourtshipfiction

URI: http://sparql.cwrc.ca/ontologies/genre#genreCourtshipfiction

courtship fiction

Fiction in which courtship is a major part of the plot.

Comment: Deprecated in favour of instance courtship fiction.

Replaced by: genre:courtshipFiction

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genre:genreCriminology

URI: http://sparql.cwrc.ca/ontologies/genre#genreCriminology

criminology

Scholarship, typically non-fiction, dealing with the study of crime, criminals, and criminal justice.

Comment: Deprecated in favour of instance criminology.

Replaced by: genre:criminology

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genre:genreDedication

URI: http://sparql.cwrc.ca/ontologies/genre#genreDedication

dedication

"A short bit of text conventionally appearing before the start of a novel or poem in which the author or poet addresses some individual, invoking his or her gratitude or thanks to that individual. Frequently, the dedication is to a spouse, friend, loved one, child, mentor, or individual who inspired the work. Several of the Inklings dedicated specific fictional works to each other (or in the case of C.S. Lewis, to children of fellow Inklings). Among scholars, one of the most significant types of dedications is a festschrift. A festschrift is a collection of essays or studies in book form, dedicated to a former teacher or professor in his or her advanced age. The individual scholarly writings come from his or her students, who typically collaborate to organize the work and contact the publisher, and they present the collection to the teacher upon its publication." (L. K Wheeler, 2017)

Comment: Deprecated in favour of instance dedication.

Replaced by: genre:dedication

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genre:genreDetective

URI: http://sparql.cwrc.ca/ontologies/genre#genreDetective

detective

Detective fiction is a subgenre of crime fiction and mystery fiction in which an investigator or a detective—either professional or amateur—investigates a crime, often murder.

Comment: Deprecated in favour of instance detective.

Replaced by: genre:detective

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genre:genreDevotional

URI: http://sparql.cwrc.ca/ontologies/genre#genreDevotional

devotional

"Christian devotional literature (also called devotionals or Christian living literature) is religious writing that is neither doctrinal nor theological, but designed for individuals to read for their personal edification and spiritual formation. Theologian Karl Holl has suggested that devotional literature came into full development at the time of Pietism during the second half of the 17th century." (DBpedia, 2017)

Comment: Deprecated in favour of instance devotional.

Replaced by: genre:devotional

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genre:genreDialogueofthedead

URI: http://sparql.cwrc.ca/ontologies/genre#genreDialogueofthedead

dialogue of the dead

"A popular style of fiction in the 17th and 18th centuries featuring conversations between the ghosts of well-known figures. Based on the satirical Dialogues of the Dead by Lucian (120-around 180 CE), but not necessarily satirical themselves." (Mazella, 2007)

Comment: This term and its description were created from data gathered from data.bnf.fr.

Replaced by: genre:dialogueOfTheDead

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genre:genreDialogueordebate

URI: http://sparql.cwrc.ca/ontologies/genre#genreDialogueordebate

dialogue or debate

"A text made up of a conversation between two or more characters, often in which the characters take up opposing sides of an argument." (Oxford, 2015)

Comment: This term and its description were created from data gathered from data.bnf.fr.

Replaced by: genre:dialogueOrDebate

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genre:genreDiary

URI: http://sparql.cwrc.ca/ontologies/genre#genreDiary

diary

"Refers to books containing the daily, personal accounts of the writer's own experiences, attitudes, and observations. Use "journals (accounts)" when referring to an individual's or an organization's account of occurrences or transactions." (Getty, 2017)

Comment: Deprecated in favour of instance diary.

Replaced by: genre:diary

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genre:genreDictionary

URI: http://sparql.cwrc.ca/ontologies/genre#genreDictionary

dictionary

"Reference sources containing alphabetical lists of words with information given for each word; generally including meanings, pronunciation, etymology, and often usage guidance." (Getty, 2017)

Comment: The description for this term is indebted to the Getty Art & Architecture Thesaurus.

Replaced by: genre:dictionary

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genre:genreDidactic

URI: http://sparql.cwrc.ca/ontologies/genre#genreDidactic

didactic

"Writing that is "preachy" or seeks overtly to convince a reader of a particular point or lesson. Medieval homilies and Victorian moral essays are often held up as examples of didactic literature, but one might argue that all literature is didactic to one extent or another since the written word frequently implies or suggests an authorial attitude. Sometimes, the lesson is overtly religious, as in the case of sermons or in literature like Milton's Paradise Lost, which seeks to "justify God's ways to men." In a more subtle way, much of Romantic literature hints at a critique of urbanized and mechanized life in 19th-century London." (L. K Wheeler, 2017)

Comment: Deprecated in favour of instance didactic.

Replaced by: genre:didactic

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genre:genreDirectory

URI: http://sparql.cwrc.ca/ontologies/genre#genreDirectory

directory

"Enumerations of names, addresses, and other data about specific groups of persons or organizations; may appear in alphabetic or graphic format." (Getty, 2017)

Comment: Deprecated in favour of instance directory.

Replaced by: genre:directory

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genre:genreDissertation

URI: http://sparql.cwrc.ca/ontologies/genre#genreDissertation

dissertation

"Written treatises, or the records of a discourse on a subject, usually prepared and presented as the final requirement for a degree or diploma and typically based on independent research and giving evidence of the candidate's mastery of the subject and of scholarly method." (Getty, 2017)

Comment: Deprecated in favour of instance dissertation.

Replaced by: genre:dissertation

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genre:genreDocumentary

URI: http://sparql.cwrc.ca/ontologies/genre#genreDocumentary

documentary

"Written, oral, sound, or photographic recordings, or presentations in other media that explain or re-create actual events, eras, life stories, or other factual information in a manner purporting to be objective and accurate." (Getty, 2017)

Comment: Deprecated in favour of instance documentary.

Replaced by: genre:documentary

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genre:genreDomestic

URI: http://sparql.cwrc.ca/ontologies/genre#genreDomestic

domestic

"Domestic realism normally refers to the genre of nineteenth-century novels popular with women readers. This body of writing is also known as "sentimental fiction" or "woman's fiction". The genre is mainly reflected in the novel though short-stories and non-fiction works such as Harriet Beecher Stowe's "Our Country Neighbors" and The New Housekeeper's Manual written by Stowe and her sister-in-law Catharine Beecher are works of domestic realism. The style's particular characteristics are: "1. Plot focuses on a heroine who embodies one of two types of exemplar: the angel and the practical woman (Reynolds) who sometimes exist in the same work. Baym says that this heroine is contrasted with the passive woman (incompetent, cowardly, ignorant; often the heroine's mother is this type) and the "belle," who is deprived of a proper education. 2. The heroine struggles for self-mastery, learning the pain of conquering her own passions (Tompkins, Sensational Designs, 172). 3. The heroine learns to balance society's demands for self-denial with her own desire for autonomy, a struggle often addressed in terms of religion. 4. She suffers at the hands of abusers of power before establishing a network of surrogate kin. 5. The plots "repeatedly identify immersion in feeling as one of the great temptations and dangers for a developing woman. They show that feeling must be controlled. . . " (Baym 25). Frances Cogan notes that the heroines thus undergo a full education within which to realize feminine obligations (The All-American Girl). 6. The tales generally end with marriage, usually one of two possible kinds: A. Reforming the bad or "wild" male, as in Augusta Evans's St. Elmo (1867) B. Marrying the solid male who already meets her qualifications.Examples: Maria Cummins, The Lamplighter (1854) and Susan Warner, The Wide, Wide World (1850) 7. The novels may use a "language of tears" that evokes sympathy from the readers. 8. Richard Brodhead (Cultures of Letters) sees class as an important issue, as the ideal family or heroine is poised between a lower-class family exemplifying poverty and domestic disorganization and upper-class characters exemplifying an idle, frivolous existence (94)." An example of this style of novel is Jane Smiley's A Thousand Acres in which the main character's confinement is emphasized in such a way. Some early exponents of the genre of domestic realism were Jane Austen and Elizabeth Barrett Browning." (DBpedia, 2017)

Comment: Deprecated in favour of instance domestic.

Replaced by: genre:domestic

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genre:genreDrama

URI: http://sparql.cwrc.ca/ontologies/genre#genreDrama

drama

"A composition in prose or verse presenting, in pantomime and dialogue, a narrative involving conflict between a character or characters and some external or internal force (see conflict). Playwrights usually design dramas for presentation on a stage in front of an audience. Aristotle called drama "imitated human action." Drama may have originated in religious ceremonies. Thespis of Attica (sixth century BCE) was the first recorded composer of a tragedy. Tragedies in their earliest stage were performed by a single actor who interacted with the chorus. The playwright Aeschylus added a second actor on the stage (deuteragonist) to allow additional conflict and dialogue. Sophocles and Euripides added a third (tritagonist). Medieval drama may have evolved independently from rites commemorating the birth and death of Christ. During the late medieval period and the early Renaissance, drama gradually altered to the form we know today. The mid-sixteenth century in England in particular was one of the greatest periods of world drama. In traditional Greek drama, as defined by Aristotle, a play was to consist of five acts and follow the three dramatic unities. In more recent drama (i.e., during the last two centuries), plays have frequently consisted of three acts, and playwrights have felt more comfortable disregarding the confines of Aristotelian rules involving verisimilitude. See also unities, comedy, tragedy, revenge play, miracle play, morality play, and mystery play. An individual work of drama is called a play. DRAMATIC CONVENTION: See convention. DRAMATIC IRONY: See irony. DRAMATIC" (L. K Wheeler, 2017)

Comment: The description for this term is indebted to Dr. L. Kip Wheeler of Carson-Newman University.

Replaced by: genre:drama

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genre:genreDramaticmonologue

URI: http://sparql.cwrc.ca/ontologies/genre#genreDramaticmonologue

dramatic monologue

"Dramatic monologue, also known as a persona poem, is a type of poetry written in the form of a speech of an individual character. M.H. Abrams notes the following three features of the dramatic monologue as it applies to poetry." (DBpedia, 2017)

Comment: Deprecated in favour of instance dramatic monologue.

Replaced by: genre:dramaticMonologue

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genre:genreDreamvision

URI: http://sparql.cwrc.ca/ontologies/genre#genreDreamvision

dream vision

"Literature, typically a poem and frequently an allegory or symbolic tale, in which the plot is a dream recounted by a narrator who dreamed it." (Oxford, 2015)

Comment: This term and its description were created from data gathered from the Oxford Dictionary of Literary Terms, 4th ed.

Replaced by: genre:dreamVision

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genre:genreDystopia

URI: http://sparql.cwrc.ca/ontologies/genre#genreDystopia

dystopia

"(from Greek, dys topos, "bad place"): The opposite of a utopia, a dystopia is an imaginary society in fictional writing that represents, as M. H. Abrams puts it, "a very unpleasant imaginary world in which ominous tendencies of our present social, political, and technological order are projected in some disastrous future culmination" (Glossary 218). For instance, while a utopia presents readers with a place where all the citizens are happy and ruled by a virtuous, efficient, rational government, a dystopia presents readers with a world where all citizens are universally unhappy, manipulated, and repressed by a sinister, sadistic totalitarian state. This government exists at best to further its own power and at worst seeks actively to destroy its own citizens' creativity, health, and happiness. Examples of fictional dystopias include Aldous Huxley's Brave New World, George Orwell's 1984, Margaret Atwood's The Handmaid's Tale, and Ursula Le Guin's The Dispossessed." (L. K Wheeler, 2017)

Comment: Deprecated in favour of instance dystopia.

Replaced by: genre:dystopia

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genre:genreEclogue

URI: http://sparql.cwrc.ca/ontologies/genre#genreEclogue

eclogue

"An eclogue is a poem in a classical style on a pastoral subject. Poems in the genre are sometimes also called bucolics." (DBpedia, 2017)

Comment: The description for this term is indebted to DBpedia.

Replaced by: genre:eclogue

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genre:genreElegy

URI: http://sparql.cwrc.ca/ontologies/genre#genreElegy

elegy

"Mournful, melancholy, or plaintive poems, especially funeral songs or laments for the dead." (Getty, 2017)

Comment: The description for this term is indebted to DBpedia.

Replaced by: genre:elegy

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genre:genreEncyclopaedia

URI: http://sparql.cwrc.ca/ontologies/genre#genreEncyclopaedia

encyclopaedia

"Books, set of books, or disks, containing informational articles on subjects in every field of knowledge, or limited to a special field or subject, usually arranged in alphabetical order." (Getty, 2017)

Comment: Deprecated in favour of instance encyclopaedia.

Replaced by: genre:encyclopaedia

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genre:genreEpic

URI: http://sparql.cwrc.ca/ontologies/genre#genreEpic

epic

"Meaning extended from "epic poetry," in modern usage refers to literary art forms, such as prose, poetry, plays, films, and other works where the story has a theme of grandeur and heroism." (Getty, 2017)

Comment: The description for this term is indebted to the Getty Art & Architecture Thesaurus.

Replaced by: genre:epic

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genre:genreEpigram

URI: http://sparql.cwrc.ca/ontologies/genre#genreEpigram

epigram

"Refers to short satiric poems or any similar pointed sayings." (Getty, 2017)

Comment: The description for this term is indebted to the Getty Art & Architecture Thesaurus.

Replaced by: genre:epigram

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genre:genreEpilogue

URI: http://sparql.cwrc.ca/ontologies/genre#genreEpilogue

epilogue

"A conclusion added to a literary work such as a novel, play, or long poem. It is the opposite of a prologue. Often, the epilogue refers to the moral of a fable. Sometimes, it is a speech made by one of the actors at the end of a play asking for the indulgence of the critics and the audience. Shakespeare's A Midsummer Night's Dream contains one of the most famous epilogues. Contrast with prologue. Do not confuse the term with eclogue." (L. K Wheeler, 2017)

Comment: The description for this term is indebted to Dr. L. Kip Wheeler of Carson-Newman University.

Replaced by: genre:epilogue

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genre:genreEpistle

URI: http://sparql.cwrc.ca/ontologies/genre#genreEpistle

epistle

"Literary genre taking the form of letters, usually of a literary, formal, or public nature. Examples are the epistles in the Biblical New Testament." (Getty, 2017)

Comment: The description for this term is indebted to DBpedia.

Replaced by: genre:epistle

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genre:genreEpistolary

URI: http://sparql.cwrc.ca/ontologies/genre#genreEpistolary

epistolary

"Novels written by using the device of a series of letters, diary entries, newspaper clippings, or other documents." (Getty, 2017)

Comment: Deprecated in favour of instance epistolary.

Replaced by: genre:epistolary

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genre:genreEpitaph

URI: http://sparql.cwrc.ca/ontologies/genre#genreEpitaph

epitaph

Comment: Deprecated in favour of instance epitaph.

Replaced by: genre:epitaph

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genre:genreEpithalamium

URI: http://sparql.cwrc.ca/ontologies/genre#genreEpithalamium

epithalamium

"An epithalamiumLatin form of Greek ἐπιθαλάμιον epithalamion from ἐπί epi "upon," and θάλαμος thalamos nuptial chamber) is a poem written specifically for the bride on the way to her marital chamber. This form continued in popularity through the history of the classical world; the Roman poet Catullus wrote a famous epithalamium, which was translated from or at least inspired by a now-lost work of Sappho. According to Origen, Song of Songs, might be an epithalamium on the marriage of Solomon with Pharaoh’s daughter." (DBpedia, 2017)

Comment: The description for this term is indebted to DBpedia.

Replaced by: genre:epithalamium

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genre:genreEpyllion

URI: http://sparql.cwrc.ca/ontologies/genre#genreEpyllion

epyllion

"Brief narrative poems in dactylic hexameter of ancient Greece, imitated by Romans and others. Usually dealing with mythological and romantic themes. They are characterized by lively description, miniaturistic attitude, scholarly allusion, and an elevated tone similar to that of the elegy." (Getty, 2017)

Comment: The description for this term is indebted to the Getty Art & Architecture Thesaurus.

Replaced by: genre:epyllion

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genre:genreEroticapornography

URI: http://sparql.cwrc.ca/ontologies/genre#genreEroticapornography

erotica pornography

"Literature, graphic art, or moving images in which much or all of the content is of a sexual nature. While pornography tends to be exclusively intended to arouse the reader or viewer, erotica typically uses sexual content to express the beauty of the human body as a form of art." (Encyclopædia Britannica, 2017)

Comment: This term and its description were created from data gathered from the Encyclopædia Britannica.

Replaced by: genre:eroticaPornography

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genre:genreEssay

URI: http://sparql.cwrc.ca/ontologies/genre#genreEssay

essay

"Short literary compositions on single subjects, often presenting the personal view of the author." (Getty, 2017)

Comment: The description for this term is indebted to DBpedia.

Replaced by: genre:essay

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genre:genreEulogy

URI: http://sparql.cwrc.ca/ontologies/genre#genreEulogy

eulogy

A eulogy (from εὐλογία, eulogia, Classical Greek for "praise") is a speech or writing in praise of a person(s) or thing(s), especially one who recently died or retired or as a term of endearment. Eulogies may be given as part of funeral services. They take place in a funeral home during or after a wake. However, some denominations either discourage or do not permit eulogies at services to maintain respect for traditions. Eulogies can also praise people who are still alive. This normally takes place on special occasions like birthdays, office parties, retirement celebrations, etc. Eulogies should not be confused with elegies, which are poems written in tribute to the dead; nor with obituaries, which are published biographies recounting the lives of those who have recently died; nor with obsequies, which refer generally to the rituals surrounding funerals. Catholic priests are prohibited by the rubrics of the Mass from presenting a eulogy for the deceased in place of a homily during a funeral Mass. The modern use of the word eulogy was first documented in the 15th century and came from the Medieval Latin term “eulogium” (Merriam-Webster 2012). “Eulogium” at that time has since turned into the shorter “eulogy” of today. Eulogies are usually delivered by a family member or a close family friend in the case of a dead person. For a living eulogy given in such cases as a retirement, a senior colleague could perhaps deliver it. On occasions, eulogies are given to those who are severely ill or elderly in order to express words of love and gratitude before they die. Eulogies are not limited to merely people, however; Places or things can also be given eulogies (which anyone can deliver), but these are less common than those delivered to people, whether living or deceased.

Comment: The description for this term is indebted to DBpedia.

Replaced by: genre:eulogy

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genre:genreExhibitioncatalogue

URI: http://sparql.cwrc.ca/ontologies/genre#genreExhibitioncatalogue

exhibition catalogue

"Publications that document the works displayed in an exhibition." (Getty, 2017)

Comment: The description for this term is indebted to the Getty Art & Architecture Thesaurus.

Replaced by: genre:exhibitionCatalogue

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genre:genreFable

URI: http://sparql.cwrc.ca/ontologies/genre#genreFable

fable

"A brief story illustrating human tendencies through animal characters. Unlike the parables, fables often include talking animals or animated objects as the principal characters. The interaction of these animals or objects reveals general truths about human nature, i.e., a person can learn practical lessons from the fictional antics in a fable. However, unlike a parable, the lesson learned is not necessarily allegorical. Each animal is not necessarily a symbol for something else. Instead, the reader learns the lesson as an exemplum--an example of what one should or should not do. The sixth century (BCE) Greek writer Aesop is most credited as an author of fables, but Phaedrus and Babrius in the first century (CE) expanded on his works to produce the tales we know today. A famous collection of Indian fables was the Sanskrit Bidpai (circa 300 CE), and in the medieval period, Marie de France (c. 1200 CE) composed 102 fables in verse. After the 1600s, fables increasingly became common as a form of children's literature. See also allegory, beast fable, and parable. Click here for a PDF handout discussing the difference between fables and parables." (L. K Wheeler, 2017)

Comment: The description for this term is indebted to the Getty Art & Architecture Thesaurus.

Replaced by: genre:fable

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genre:genreFabliau

URI: http://sparql.cwrc.ca/ontologies/genre#genreFabliau

fabliau

"A humorous, frequently ribald or "dirty" narrative popular with French poets, who traditionally wrote the story in octosyllabic couplets. The tales frequently revolve around trickery, practical jokes, sexual mishaps, scatology, mistaken identity, and bodily humor. Chaucer included several fabliaux in The Canterbury Tales, including the stories of the Shipman, the Friar, the Miller, the Reeve, and the Cook. Examples from French literature include Les Quatre Souhais Saint Martin, Audigier, and Beranger au Long Cul (Beranger of the Long Ass)." (L. K Wheeler, 2017)

Comment: The description for this term is indebted to Dr. L. Kip Wheeler of Carson-Newman University.

Replaced by: genre:fabliau

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genre:genreFairytale

URI: http://sparql.cwrc.ca/ontologies/genre#genreFairytale

fairytale

"Fairytale fantasy is distinguished from other subgenres of fantasy by the works' heavy use of motifs, and often plots, from folklore." (DBpedia, 2017)

Comment: Deprecated in favour of instance fairytale.

Replaced by: genre:fairytale

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genre:genreFantasy

URI: http://sparql.cwrc.ca/ontologies/genre#genreFantasy

fantasy

"Literary genre in which works are of a whimsical or visionary nature, having suppositions that are speculation or resting on no solid grounds." (Getty, 2017)

Comment: Deprecated in favour of instance fantasy.

Replaced by: genre:fantasy

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genre:genreFarce

URI: http://sparql.cwrc.ca/ontologies/genre#genreFarce

farce

"(from Latin Farsus, "stuffed"): A farce is a form of low comedy designed to provoke laughter through highly exaggerated caricatures of people in improbable or silly situations. Traits of farce include (1) physical bustle such as slapstick, (2) sexual misunderstandings and mix-ups, and (3) broad verbal humor such as puns. Many literary critics (especially in the Victorian period) have tended to view farce as inferior to "high comedy" that involves brilliant dialogue. Many of Shakespeare's early works, such as The Taming of the Shrew, are considered farces. Contrast with comedy of manners." (L. K Wheeler, 2017)

Comment: This term and its description were created from data gathered from DBpedia.

Replaced by: genre:farce

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genre:genreFeminist

URI: http://sparql.cwrc.ca/ontologies/genre#genreFeminist

feminist

"Writing concerned with the unique experience of being a woman or alternatively writing designed to challenge existing preconceptions of gender. Examples of feminist writings include Christine de Pisan's medieval work, The City of Ladies; Aemilia Lanyer's Renaissance treatise, Salve Deus, Rex Judaeorum (which presented the then-shocking idea that Adam was just as much to blame for the fall of man as Eve was in the Genesis account); Mary Wollstonecraft's Vindication, and Susan B. Anthony's nineteenth-century essays (which presented the equally shocking idea that women in America and Canada should have the right to vote). Many female students in my class preface their discussions of feminist writings by stating, "I'm not a feminist, but ..." This tendency always puzzled me, since it implies that feminism is something negative, radical, or always liberal. Worse yet, it implies that it's bad for women to want crazy, misguided things like education, equal health insurance, similar pay to what men earn in similar professions, freedom from harassment, and funding for medical problems concerning women, such as breast and uterine cancer research, which are the primary concerns of feminism. Somewhere toward the end of the twentieth-century, detractors of such writers have caricatured these demands as "man-hating" or "anti-family." As an antidote to such thinking, keep in mind the broader definition: a feminist is anyone who thinks that women are people too." (L. K Wheeler, 2017)

Comment: Deprecated in favour of instance feminist.

Replaced by: genre:feminist

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genre:genreFeministtheory

URI: http://sparql.cwrc.ca/ontologies/genre#genreFeministtheory

feminist theory

"Feminist theory is the extension of feminism into theoretical, fictional, or philosophical discourse. It aims to understand the nature of gender inequality. It examines women's and men's social roles, experience, interests, chores, and feminist politics in a variety of fields, such as anthropology and sociology, communication, psychoanalysis, home economics, literature, education, and philosophy." (DBpedia, 2017)

Comment: This term and its description were created from data gathered from DBpedia.

Replaced by: genre:feministTheory

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genre:genreFiction

URI: http://sparql.cwrc.ca/ontologies/genre#genreFiction

fiction

"Genre that refers to works evoked from the imagination of the writer and not conferred as fact. In literature, fiction generally refers to the novel, novella, short story, and poetic forms." (Getty, 2017)

Comment: The description for this term is indebted to the Getty Art & Architecture Thesaurus.

Replaced by: genre:fiction

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genre:genreFilmtvscript

URI: http://sparql.cwrc.ca/ontologies/genre#genreFilmtvscript

film tv script

"Written texts of stage plays, screenplays, and radio or television broadcasts." (Getty, 2017)

Comment: This term and its description were created from data gathered from the Getty Art & Architecture Thesaurus.

Replaced by: genre:filmTvScript

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genre:genreFolksong

URI: http://sparql.cwrc.ca/ontologies/genre#genreFolksong

folk song

"A song recorded or transcribed after being preserved for generations by a particular culture through an oral tradition, or more recent songs composed in the style of that tradition." (Oxford, 2015)

Comment: This term and its description were created from data gathered from the Oxford Dictionary of Literary Terms, 4th ed.

Replaced by: genre:folkSong

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genre:genreGardeningbook

URI: http://sparql.cwrc.ca/ontologies/genre#genreGardeningbook

gardening

A text, typically non-fiction, dealing with the subject of gardening.

Comment: Deprecated in favour of instance gardening.

Replaced by: genre:gardeningBook

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genre:genreGenealogy

URI: http://sparql.cwrc.ca/ontologies/genre#genreGenealogy

genealogy

"Accounts or histories of the descent of persons, families, or other groups, from an ancestor or ancestors; enumerations of ancestors and their descendants in the natural order of succession." (Getty, 2017)

Comment: The description for this term is indebted to the Getty Art & Architecture Thesaurus.

Replaced by: genre:genealogy

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genre:genreGeorgic

URI: http://sparql.cwrc.ca/ontologies/genre#genreGeorgic

georgic

"Poetry about rural life that gives practical advice on the subject of agriculture. Unlike pastoral poetry, it does not portray the countryside as an idyllic escape, but rather focuses on the necessity of outdoor labour." (Oxford, 2015)

Comment: Deprecated in favour of instance georgic.

Replaced by: genre:georgic

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genre:genreGhoststory

URI: http://sparql.cwrc.ca/ontologies/genre#genreGhoststory

ghost story

"Prose tales of the supernatural in which the living encounter manifestations of the spirits of the dead." (Getty, 2017)

Comment: Deprecated in favour of instance ghost story.

Replaced by: genre:ghostStory

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genre:genreGiftbook

URI: http://sparql.cwrc.ca/ontologies/genre#genreGiftbook

giftbook

"Books, usually illustrated literary anthologies, intended to be given as gifts and often published annually; popular in the 19th century. For works produced to mark an occasion, use "keepsakes (books)." (Getty, 2017)

Comment: Deprecated in favour of instance giftbook.

Replaced by: genre:giftbook

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genre:genreGothic

URI: http://sparql.cwrc.ca/ontologies/genre#genreGothic

gothic

"Romantic fictions having a prevailing atmosphere of mystery and terror, often combined with a love story. The genre was introduced in England ca. 1765, but soon became popular elsewhere in Europe, reaching its heyday in the 1790s. The genre has undergone frequent revivals in subsequent centuries. It is called "Gothic" because the early examples were often set in part among medieval buildings and ruins, such as castles or monasteries." (Getty, 2017)

Comment: Deprecated in favour of instance gothic.

Replaced by: genre:gothic

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genre:genreGovernmentreport

URI: http://sparql.cwrc.ca/ontologies/genre#genreGovernmentreport

government report

An official government publication covering any of a wide variety of subjects.

Comment: Deprecated in favour of instance government report.

Replaced by: genre:governmentReport

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genre:genreGrammar

URI: http://sparql.cwrc.ca/ontologies/genre#genreGrammar

grammar

"GRAMMAR: Another term for transformational grammar." (L. K Wheeler, 2017)

Comment: This term and its description were created from data gathered from DBpedia.

Replaced by: genre:grammar

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genre:genreGraveyardpoetry

URI: http://sparql.cwrc.ca/ontologies/genre#genreGraveyardpoetry

graveyard poetry

"An 18th-century poetic form dealing with the subjects of death and immortality. The name originates from the setting typical of these poems: the graveyard." (Oxford, 2015)

Comment: Deprecated in favour of instance graveyard poetry.

Replaced by: genre:graveyardPoetry

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genre:genreGuidebook

URI: http://sparql.cwrc.ca/ontologies/genre#genreGuidebook

guidebook

"Handbooks for the guidance of strangers or visitors in a district, town, building, etc., giving a description of the roads, places, or objects of interest to be found there." (Getty, 2017)

Comment: Deprecated in favour of instance guidebook.

Replaced by: genre:guidebook

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genre:genreHagiography

URI: http://sparql.cwrc.ca/ontologies/genre#genreHagiography

hagiography

Biographies of saints, usually written, but includes oral or visual works as well.

Comment: The description for this term is indebted to DBpedia.

Replaced by: genre:hagiography

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genre:genreHaiku

URI: http://sparql.cwrc.ca/ontologies/genre#genreHaiku

haiku

"(plural: haiku, from archaic Japanese): The term haiku is a fairly late addition to Japanese poetry. The poet Shiki coined the term in the nineteenth century from a longer, more traditional phrase, haikai renga no hokku ("the introductory lines of light linked verse"). To understand the haiku's history as a genre, peruse the vocabulary entries for its predecessors, the hokku and the haikai renga or renku. The haiku follows several conventions: Many Japanese poets have used the form, the two acknowledged masters being Bashó (a nom de plume for Matsuo Munefusa, 1644-94); and Kobayashi Issa (a nom de plume for Kobayashi Nobuyuki). The Imagist Movement in 20th century English literature has been profoundly influenced by haiku. The list of poets who attempted the haiku or admired the genre includes Ezra Pound, Amy Lowell, Robert Frost, Conrad Aiken, and W. B. Yeats. Contrast haiku with the tanka and the senryu. See also hokku, below, and haikai, above. See also kigo and imagism. You can click here to download a PDF handout summarizing this discussion of haiku, or you can click here to download PDF samples of haiku." (L. K Wheeler, 2017)

Comment: This term and its description were created from data gathered from DBpedia.

Replaced by: genre:haiku

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genre:genreHarlequinade

URI: http://sparql.cwrc.ca/ontologies/genre#genreHarlequinade

harlequinade

"Books popular in the 18th and 19th centuries, originally often depicting harlequins, in which folded parts of pages are lifted to reveal new pictures, fitted neatly onto the remaining parts of the previous pictures." (Getty, 2017)

Comment: This term and its description were created from data gathered from the Getty Art & Architecture Thesaurus.

Replaced by: genre:harlequinade

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genre:genreHeroic

URI: http://sparql.cwrc.ca/ontologies/genre#genreHeroic

heroic

"Form of poetry comprising long narratives celebrating on a grand scale the adventures and deeds of one or more heroic figures, ordinarily concerning a serious subject significant to a culture or nation. Classical epic poetry employs dactylic hexameter and recounts a journey." (Getty, 2017)

Comment: The description for this term is indebted to the Getty Art & Architecture Thesaurus.

Replaced by: genre:heroic

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genre:genreHistorical

URI: http://sparql.cwrc.ca/ontologies/genre#genreHistorical

historical writing

"Refers to maps that indicate political administrative boundaries or other characteristics of a region at periods of time before the present. They typically include historical names for places, historical population dispositions, and the historical state of physical features." (Getty, 2017)

Comment: Deprecated in favour of instance historical writing.

Replaced by: genre:historical

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genre:genreHistory

URI: http://sparql.cwrc.ca/ontologies/genre#genreHistory

history

"Chronological records of significant events, as of the life or development of a people, country, or institution, often with an explanation of the causes." (Getty, 2017)

Comment: The description for this term is indebted to the Getty Art & Architecture Thesaurus.

Replaced by: genre:history

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genre:genreHymn

URI: http://sparql.cwrc.ca/ontologies/genre#genreHymn

hymn

"A religious song consisting of one or more repeating rhythmical stanzas. In classical Roman literature, hymns to Minerva and Jupiter survive. The Greek poet Sappho wrote a number of hymns to Aphrodite. More recently a vast number of hymns appear in Catholic and Protestant religious lyrics. A particularly vibrant tradition of hymn-writing comes from the South's African-American population during the nineteenth century. In the realm of fiction, C.S. Lewis creates hymns for the Solid Ones in The Great Divorce, and Tolkien creates Elvish hymns such as "O Elbereth" in The Lord of the Rings, typically with quatrain structure alternating with couplet stanzas. In the example of "O Elbereth," the hymn honors one of the Maiar spirits. See also paean." (L. K Wheeler, 2017)

Comment: The description for this term is indebted to Dr. L. Kip Wheeler of Carson-Newman University.

Replaced by: genre:hymn

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genre:genreImitation

URI: http://sparql.cwrc.ca/ontologies/genre#genreImitation

imitation

"A form of intertextuality in which a writer intentionally adopts the style of another writer or borrows important elements of someone else's work." (Penguin, 1999)

Comment: Deprecated in favour of instance imitation.

Replaced by: genre:imitation

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genre:genreIndustrialnovel

URI: http://sparql.cwrc.ca/ontologies/genre#genreIndustrialnovel

industrial novel

"A novel that exposes the living or working conditions of the 19th century-working class as a result of the industrial revolution. The shocking circumstances—extreme poverty, deplorable factory conditions, widespread disease, over-crowded housing, etc.—are typically described in great detail. Solutions are often proposed, but the main goal of an industrial novel is to make the plight of the lower class known to the middle and upper classes in order to promote social change." (Penguin, 1999)

Comment: Deprecated in favour of instance industrial novel.

Replaced by: genre:industrialNovel

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genre:genreIntroduction

URI: http://sparql.cwrc.ca/ontologies/genre#genreIntroduction

introduction

"The opening section of a text, often in the form of an essay, that usually provides an overview of the text's subject matter and explains the author's reason for writing." (Penguin, 1999)

Comment: Deprecated in favour of instance introduction.

Replaced by: genre:introduction

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genre:genreJournalism

URI: http://sparql.cwrc.ca/ontologies/genre#genreJournalism

journalism

"Content prepared for a newspaper, magazine, news website, or other form of news media, typically with the purpose of recording facts about a person or event." (Merriam-Webster, 2017)

Comment: This term and its description were created from data gathered from DBpedia.

Replaced by: genre:journalism

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genre:genreJuvenilia

URI: http://sparql.cwrc.ca/ontologies/genre#genreJuvenilia

juvenilia

"Literary or artistic works produced by persons in their childhood or youth; usually used to set those works apart from later, mature works." (Getty, 2017)

Comment: Deprecated in favour of instance juvenilia.

Replaced by: genre:juvenilia

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genre:genreKitchensinkdrama

URI: http://sparql.cwrc.ca/ontologies/genre#genreKitchensinkdrama

kitchen sink drama

"Originating in Britain in the 1950s, realistic drama centred on the domestic lives of working-class characters." (Oxford, 2015)

Comment: This term and its description were created from data gathered from the Oxford Dictionary of Literary Terms, 4th ed.

Replaced by: genre:kitchenSinkDrama

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genre:genreKunstlerroman

URI: http://sparql.cwrc.ca/ontologies/genre#genreKunstlerroman

kunstlerroman

"German for “artist-novel.” A novel in which an artist is the main character, often following the development of his or her life and artistic growth, as in a bildungsroman." (Oxford, 2015)

Comment: This term and its description were created from data gathered from the Oxford Dictionary of Literary Terms, 4th ed.

Replaced by: genre:kunstlerroman

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genre:genreLais

URI: http://sparql.cwrc.ca/ontologies/genre#genreLais

lais

"A laisse is a type of stanza, of varying length, found in medieval French literature, specifically medieval French epic poetry (the chanson de geste), such as The Song of Roland. In early works, each laisse was made up of (mono) assonanced verses, although the appearance of (mono) rhymed laisses was increasingly common in later poems. Within a poem, the length of each separate laisse is variable (whereas the metric length of the verses is invariable, each verse having the same syllable length, typically decasyllables or, occasionally, alexandrines. The laisse is characterized by stereotyped phrases and formulas and frequently repeated themes and motifs, including repetitions of material from one laisse to another. Such repetitions and formulaic structures are common of orality and oral-formulaic composition. When medieval poets repeated content (with different wording or assonance/rhyme) from one laisse to another, such "similar" laisses are called laisses similaires in French." (DBpedia, 2017)

Comment: The description for this term is indebted to DBpedia.

Replaced by: genre:lais

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genre:genreLampoon

URI: http://sparql.cwrc.ca/ontologies/genre#genreLampoon

lampoon

"A coarse or crude satire ridiculing the appearance or character of another person." (L. K Wheeler, 2017)

Comment: Deprecated in favour of instance lampoon.

Replaced by: genre:lampoon

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genre:genreLegalwriting

URI: http://sparql.cwrc.ca/ontologies/genre#genreLegalwriting

legal writing

"Legal writing is a type of technical writing used by lawyers, judges, legislators, and others in law to express legal analysis and legal rights and duties. Legal writing in practice is used to advocate for or to express the resolution of a client's legal matter." (DBpedia, 2017)

Comment: Deprecated in favour of instance legal writing.

Replaced by: genre:legalWriting

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genre:genreLegendFolktale

URI: http://sparql.cwrc.ca/ontologies/genre#genreLegendFolktale

legend folktale

"Stories that have been maintained over time, usually by a particular culture through an oral tradition. Often understood within originating cultures as historical accounts although they differ from Western record-keeping." (Getty, 2017)

Comment: Deprecated in favour of instance legend folktale.

Replaced by: genre:legendFolktale

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genre:genreLesbian

URI: http://sparql.cwrc.ca/ontologies/genre#genreLesbian

lesbian

"Azalea: A Magazine by Third World Lesbians was a quarterly periodical for black, Asian, Latina, and Native American lesbians published between 1977 and 1983 by the Salsa Soul Sisters, Third World Wimmin Inc Collective. The Collective also published the Salsa Soul Sisters/Third World Women's Gay-zette (c. 1982)." (DBpedia, 2017)

Comment: Deprecated in favour of instance lesbian writing.

Replaced by: genre:lesbian

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genre:genreLetter

URI: http://sparql.cwrc.ca/ontologies/genre#genreLetter

letter

"Pieces of correspondence that are somewhat more formal than memoranda or notes, usually on paper and delivered." (Getty, 2017)

Comment: Deprecated in favour of instance letter.

Replaced by: genre:letter

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genre:genreLettersfromthedeadtotheliving

URI: http://sparql.cwrc.ca/ontologies/genre#genreLettersfromthedeadtotheliving

letters from the dead to the living

Moralised case-histories in the form of letters in which the dead strive to reclaim the living beloved by persuading them to repent and reform. Often include features of lively fiction: character-drawing, narrative, suspense, surprise, humour, and love-situations including transgression of all kinds.

Comment: Deprecated in favour of instance [http://sparql.cwrc.ca/ontologies/genre#lettersFromTheDeadToTheLiving].

Replaced by: genre:lettersFromTheDeadToTheLiving

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genre:genreLibretto

URI: http://sparql.cwrc.ca/ontologies/genre#genreLibretto

libretto

"Books or booklets containing the text or words of an opera or similar extended musical composition." (Getty, 2017)

Comment: Deprecated in favour of instance libretto.

Replaced by: genre:libretto

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genre:genreLiteraryCriticism

URI: http://sparql.cwrc.ca/ontologies/genre#genreLiteraryCriticism

literary criticism

Writing that analyzes or critiques a literary work, often through the use of a particular literary theory, and typically in the form of an essay.

Comment: This term and its description were created from data gathered from DBpedia.

Replaced by: genre:literaryCriticism

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genre:genreLiturgy

URI: http://sparql.cwrc.ca/ontologies/genre#genreLiturgy

liturgy

"Writing, typically in the form of a prayer or a song, to be used by a particular religious community for the purpose of worship." (Getty, 2017)

Comment: This term and its description were created from data gathered from the Getty Art & Architecture Thesaurus.

Replaced by: genre:liturgy

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genre:genreLove

URI: http://sparql.cwrc.ca/ontologies/genre#genreLove

love

Generic modifier for a representation that deals primarily with the subject of love.

Comment: Deprecated in favour of instance love.

Replaced by: genre:love

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genre:genreLyric

URI: http://sparql.cwrc.ca/ontologies/genre#genreLyric

lyric

"Lyric Essay is a subgenre of essay writing, which combines qualities of poetry, essay, memoir, and research writing. The lyric essay is considered high art, and often requires work and association on behalf of the reader. Proponents of the lyric essay classification insist it differs from prose poetry in its reliance on association rather than line breaks and juxtaposition." (DBpedia, 2017)

Comment: The description for this term is indebted to DBpedia.

Replaced by: genre:lyric

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genre:genreMagicrealist

URI: http://sparql.cwrc.ca/ontologies/genre#genreMagicrealist

magic realist

"A style of fiction popularized in Latin-American writing from the mid-twentieth century, in which magical or fantastical elements are not treated as unusual, but rather occur alongside realistic elements as a natural part of the narrative." (Encyclopædia Britannica, 2017)

Comment: Deprecated in favour of instance magic realist.

Replaced by: genre:magicRealist

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genre:genreManifesto

URI: http://sparql.cwrc.ca/ontologies/genre#genreManifesto

manifesto

"Formal written declarations, promulgated by a sovereign or by the executive authority of a state or nation, such as to proclaim its reasons and motives for declaring a war, or other international action; also public declarations or proclamations of political, social, artistic, or other principles." (Getty, 2017)

Comment: Deprecated in favour of instance manifesto.

Replaced by: genre:manifesto

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genre:genreManual

URI: http://sparql.cwrc.ca/ontologies/genre#genreManual

manual

"Books or treatises, often compendious, containing rules or instructions needed to perform tasks, operations, processes, occupations, arts, or studies, and intended to be used as reference while the task or study is performed." (Getty, 2017)

Comment: Deprecated in favour of instance manual.

Replaced by: genre:manual

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genre:genreMap

URI: http://sparql.cwrc.ca/ontologies/genre#genreMap

map

"Refers to graphic or photogrammetric representations of the Earth's surface or a part of it, including physical features and political boundaries, where each point corresponds to a geographical or celestial position according to a definite scale or projection. The term may also refer to similar depictions of other planets, suns, other heavenly bodies, or areas of the heavens. Maps are typically depicted on a flat medium, such as on paper, a wall, or a computer screen." (Getty, 2017)

Comment: This term and its description were created from data gathered from the Getty Art & Architecture Thesaurus.

Replaced by: genre:map

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genre:genreMasque

URI: http://sparql.cwrc.ca/ontologies/genre#genreMasque

masque

"Not to be confused with a masquerade, a masque is a type of elaborate court entertainment popular in the times of Queen Elizabeth I, King James I, and Charles I--i.e., the early 17th Century after Queen Elizabeth's death. The masque as a performance grew out of medieval plays, but it was more spectacle than drama proper. The content was suitable for amateur actors rather than professional performers. The masques tended to use long speeches and little action. They combined poetic drama, singing, dancing, music, and splendid costumes and settings. The imagery was influential on later poets and poems, such as Andrew Marvell, who makes use of masque-imagery in "Upon Appleton House." (L. K Wheeler, 2017)

Comment: Deprecated in favour of instance masque.

Replaced by: genre:masque

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genre:genreMedicalwriting

URI: http://sparql.cwrc.ca/ontologies/genre#genreMedicalwriting

medical writing

Writing, typically of a scientific nature, relating to the field of medicine.

Comment: Deprecated in favour of instance medical writing.

Replaced by: genre:medicalWriting

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genre:genreMelodrama

URI: http://sparql.cwrc.ca/ontologies/genre#genreMelodrama

melodrama

"A dramatic form characterized by excessive sentiment, exaggerated emotion, sensational and thrilling action, and an artificially happy ending. Melodramas originally referred to romantic plays featuring music, singing, and dancing, but by the eighteenth century they connoted simplified and coincidental plots, bathos, and happy endings. These melodramatic traits are present in Gothic novels, western stories, popular films, and television crime shows, to name but a few more recent examples." (L. K Wheeler, 2017)

Comment: Deprecated in favour of instance melodrama.

Replaced by: genre:melodrama

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genre:genreMixedmedia

URI: http://sparql.cwrc.ca/ontologies/genre#genreMixedmedia

mixed media

"Visual works created using multiple media." (Getty, 2017)

Comment: Deprecated in favour of instance mixed media.

Replaced by: genre:mixedMedia

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genre:genreMockforms

URI: http://sparql.cwrc.ca/ontologies/genre#genreMockforms

mock forms

Writing that uses the conventions of a specific genre satirically in order to mock or parody that genre.

Comment: Deprecated in favour of instance mock forms.

Replaced by: genre:mockForms

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genre:genreMonologue

URI: http://sparql.cwrc.ca/ontologies/genre#genreMonologue

monologue

"In theatre, a monologue (from Greek μονόλογος from μόνος mónos, "alone, solitary" and λόγος lógos, "speech") is a speech presented by a single character, most often to express their mental thoughts aloud, though sometimes also to directly address another character or the audience. Monologues are common across the range of dramatic media (plays, films, etc.), as well as in non-dramatic media such as poetry. Monologues share much in common with several other literary devices including soliloquies, apostrophes, and aside. There are, however, distinctions between each of these devices." (DBpedia, 2017)

Comment: The description for this term is indebted to DBpedia.

Replaced by: genre:monologue

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genre:genreMoralitymysteryplay

URI: http://sparql.cwrc.ca/ontologies/genre#genreMoralitymysteryplay

morality or mystery play

"Religious dramas or pageants, typically written anonymously, that were popular in medieval Europe. Mystery plays represent one or more scenes from the Bible, and were first performed in the 13th century, often using a wagon as a stage to allow a performance to take place in various locations, . Morality plays were first popularized in the 15th century, and are allegorical rather than directly representational works in which personified vices and virtues compete to win a human soul for eternity." (Oxford, 2015)

Comment: Deprecated in favour of instance morality or mystery play.

Replaced by: genre:moralityOrMysteryPlay

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genre:genreMultimedia

URI: http://sparql.cwrc.ca/ontologies/genre#genreMultimedia

multimedia

"Contemporary works of art that employ several distinct art forms, such as sculpture and music or painting and light art." (Getty, 2017)

Comment: Deprecated in favour of instance multimedia.

Replaced by: genre:multimedia

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genre:genreMusicology

URI: http://sparql.cwrc.ca/ontologies/genre#genreMusicology

musicology

"Writing dealing with the scientific study of music." (Getty, 2017)

Comment: Deprecated in favour of instance musicology.

Replaced by: genre:musicology

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genre:genreMystery

URI: http://sparql.cwrc.ca/ontologies/genre#genreMystery

mystery

"A novel focused on suspense and solving a mystery--especially a murder, theft, kidnapping, or some other crime. The protagonist faces inexplicable events, threats, assaults, and unknown forces or antagonists. Conventionally, the hero is a keenly observant individual (such as Sherlock Holmes) and the police are depicted as incompetent or incapable of solving the crime by themselves. Many of the works of Sir Arthur Conan Doyle, Edgar Allan Poe, and Agatha Christie are mystery novels." (L. K Wheeler, 2017)

Comment: The description for this term is indebted to Dr. L. Kip Wheeler of Carson-Newman University.

Replaced by: genre:mystery

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genre:genreMyth

URI: http://sparql.cwrc.ca/ontologies/genre#genreMyth

myth

"Legendary stories without a determinable basis of fact or natural explanation, typically concerning a being, hero, deity, or event and explains some practice, rite, or phenomenon of nature." (Getty, 2017)

Comment: The description for this term is indebted to the Getty Art & Architecture Thesaurus.

Replaced by: genre:myth

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genre:genreNarrativepoetry

URI: http://sparql.cwrc.ca/ontologies/genre#genreNarrativepoetry

narrative poetry

"Narrative poetry is a form of poetry that tells a story, often making use of the voices of a narrator and characters as well; the entire story is usually written in metred verse. Narrative poems do not have to follow rhythmic patterns. The poems that make up this genre may be short or long, and the story it relates to may be complex. It is usually well it normally dramatic, with objectives, diverse characters, and metre. Narrative poems include epics, ballads, idylls, and lays. Some narrative poetry takes the form of a novel in verse. An example of this is The Ring and the Book by Robert Browning. In terms of narrative poetry, a romance is a narrative poem that tells a story of chivalry. Examples include the Romance of the Rose or Tennyson's Idylls of the King. Although these examples use medieval and Arthurian materials, romances may also tell stories from classical mythology. Shorter narrative poems are often similar in style to the short story. Sometimes these short narratives are collected into interrelated groups, as with Chaucer's The Canterbury Tales. Some literatures contain prose naose narratives, and the Old Norse sagas include both incidental poetry and the biographies of poets. An example is "The Cremation of Sam McGee" by Robert Service." (DBpedia, 2017)

Comment: The description for this term is indebted to DBpedia.

Replaced by: genre:narrativePoetry

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genre:genreNationaltale

URI: http://sparql.cwrc.ca/ontologies/genre#genreNationaltale

national tale

"A romantic genre developed in early nineteenth-century, particularly associated with Ireland and Scotland, in which historical content is woven into narratives treating such subjects as the formation or defence of a nation, political conflict with a bearing on nationhood, and national identity or culture." (Foster, 2006)

Comment: Deprecated in favour of instance national tale.

Replaced by: genre:nationalTale

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genre:genreNotebook

URI: http://sparql.cwrc.ca/ontologies/genre#genreNotebook

notebook

"Notebook is a style of writing where people jot down what they have thought or heard at the spur of moment. The contents of a notebook are unorganized, and the number of subjects covered in a notebook are unlimited: a paragraph of autobiography can be followed immediately by one on astronomy or one on history. Some famous authors are also famous for the notebooks they left. The Italian poet Giacomo Leopardi kept a notebook, called Zibaldone, from 1817 to 1832. The idea of keeping that, which contains no fewer than 4,526 pages, was possibly suggested by a priest who fled from the French Revolution and came to live in the poet's hometown. The priest suggested that "every literary man should have a written chaos such as this: notebook containing sottiseries, adrersa, excerpta, pugillares, commentaria... the store-house out of which fine literature of every kind may come, as the sun, moon, and stars issued out of chaos." There are writers who earned their posthumous fame solely by their notebooks, such as the German scientist and humorous writer Georg Lichtenberg. He called his notebooks "waste book," using the English book-keeping term. He explains the purpose of his "waste book" in his notebook E: The notebooks of scientists, such as those of Michael Faraday and Charles Darwin, can reveal the development of their scientific theories. On the other hand, the notebooks used by scientists for recording their experiments are called lab notebooks. The notebooks used by artists are usually referred as sketchbooks, which may contain more than sketches. Leonardo da Vinci's notebooks contain his writings on painting, sculpture, architecture, anatomy, mining, inventions and music, as well as his sketches, his grocery lists and the names of people who owed him money. In Chinese literature, "notebook" or biji is a distinct genre, and has a broader meaning." (DBpedia, 2017)

Comment: This term and its description were created from data gathered from CRHQ CNRS.

Replaced by: genre:notebook

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genre:genreNovel

URI: http://sparql.cwrc.ca/ontologies/genre#genreNovel

novel

"Invented prose narratives of considerable length and a certain complexity that deal imaginatively with human experience through a connected sequence of events involving a group of persons in a specific setting." (Getty, 2017)

Comment: Deprecated in favour of instance novel.

Replaced by: genre:novel

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genre:genreNovella

URI: http://sparql.cwrc.ca/ontologies/genre#genreNovella

novella

"Short prose tales popular in the Renaissance and for later prose narratives intermediate between novels and short stories." (Getty, 2017)

Comment: Deprecated in favour of instance novella.

Replaced by: genre:novella

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genre:genreNurseryrhyme

URI: http://sparql.cwrc.ca/ontologies/genre#genreNurseryrhyme

nursery rhyme

"Tales in rhymed verse for children." (Getty, 2017)

Comment: Deprecated in favour of instance nursery rhyme.

Replaced by: genre:nurseryRhyme

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genre:genreObituary

URI: http://sparql.cwrc.ca/ontologies/genre#genreObituary

obituary

"Obituary poetry, in the broad sense, includes any poem that commemorates a person or group of people's death: an elegy. In its stricter sense, though, it refers to a genre of popular verse or folk poetry that had its greatest popularity in the nineteenth century, especially in the United States of America. The genre consists largely of sentimental narrative verse that tells the story of the demise of its typically named subjects, and seeks to console their mourners with descriptions of their happy afterlife. The genre achieved its peak of popularity in the decade of the 1870s. While usually full chiefly of conventional pious sentiments, the obituary poets in one sense continue the program of meditations on death begun by the eighteenth-century graveyard poets, such as Edward Young's Night Thoughts, and as such continue one of the themes that went into literary Romanticism." (DBpedia, 2017)

Comment: The description for this term is indebted to DBpedia.

Replaced by: genre:obituary

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genre:genreOccasionalpoetry

URI: http://sparql.cwrc.ca/ontologies/genre#genreOccasionalpoetry

occasional poetry

Occasional poetry is poetry composed for a particular occasion. In the history of literature, it is often studied in connection with orality, performance, and patronage.

Comment: The description for this term is indebted to DBpedia.

Replaced by: genre:occasionalPoetry

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genre:genreOde

URI: http://sparql.cwrc.ca/ontologies/genre#genreOde

ode

"Lyric poems of exalted emotion devoted to the praise or celebration of its subject; often employing complex or irregular metrical form." (Getty, 2017)

Comment: The description for this term is indebted to the Getty Art & Architecture Thesaurus.

Replaced by: genre:ode

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genre:genreOneactplay

URI: http://sparql.cwrc.ca/ontologies/genre#genreOneactplay

one-act play

"A theatre production of only one act, typically under an hour in length and with a very small cast." (Penguin, 1999)

Comment: This term and its description were created from data gathered from the Penguin Dictionary of Literary Terms & Literary Theory, 4th ed.

Replaced by: genre:oneActPlay

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genre:genreOpera

URI: http://sparql.cwrc.ca/ontologies/genre#genreOpera

opera

"Dramatic musical performances in which most roles are sung with instrumental accompanyment, usually including arias, recitives, and choruses. Typically, they are intended to be staged with costumes, sets, and dramatic movement." (Getty, 2017)

Comment: This term and its description were created from data gathered from DBpedia.

Replaced by: genre:opera

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genre:genreOratorio

URI: http://sparql.cwrc.ca/ontologies/genre#genreOratorio

oratorio

"A lengthy musical composition for voice and orchestra, typically narrative and religious in nature. Unlike an opera, it is not a theatrical performance and does not include costumes or sets." (Oxford, 2015)

Comment: This term and its description were created from data gathered from DBpedia.

Replaced by: genre:oratorio

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genre:genreOriental

URI: http://sparql.cwrc.ca/ontologies/genre#genreOriental

oriental

"Writing about the East by Western writers and with a Western perspective, encompassing everything from fiction to scientific writing. In Oriental writing, even if not looked down upon as inferior, Eastern cultures are represented as foreign and exotic, and in need of translation, interpretation, or explanation." (Penguin, 1999)

Comment: This term and its description were created from data gathered from the Penguin Dictionary of Literary Terms & Literary Theory, 4th ed.

Replaced by: genre:oriental

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genre:genrePageant

URI: http://sparql.cwrc.ca/ontologies/genre#genrePageant

pageant

"Entertainments, frequently held in the open air, illustrating themes by means of spectacle rather than by consecutive narrative and dramatic characterization." (Getty, 2017)

Comment: Deprecated in favour of instance pageant.

Replaced by: genre:pageant

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genre:genrePanegyric

URI: http://sparql.cwrc.ca/ontologies/genre#genrePanegyric

panegyric

"A speech or poem designed to praise another person or group. In ancient Greek and Roman rhetoric, it was one branch of public speaking, with established rules and conventions found in the works of Menander and Hermogenes. Famous examples include Pliny's eulogy on Emperor Trajan and Isocrates' oration on the Olympic games of 380." (L. K Wheeler, 2017)

Comment: The description for this term is indebted to Dr. L. Kip Wheeler of Carson-Newman University.

Replaced by: genre:panegyric

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genre:genrePantomime

URI: http://sparql.cwrc.ca/ontologies/genre#genrePantomime

pantomime

"Pantomime (informally panto) is a type of musical comedy stage production, designed for family entertainment. It was developed in England and is still performed there, generally during the Christmas and New Year season and, to a lesser extent, in other English-speaking countries. Modern pantomime includes songs, slapstick comedy and dancing, employs gender-crossing actors, and combines topical humour with a story loosely based on a well-known fairy tale, fable or folk tale. It is a participatory form of theatre, in which the audience is expected to sing along with certain parts of the music and shout out phrases to the performers." (DBpedia, 2017)

Comment: This term and its description were created from data gathered from DBpedia.

Replaced by: genre:pantomime

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genre:genreParable

URI: http://sparql.cwrc.ca/ontologies/genre#genreParable

parable

"Short, fictitious stories that illustrate a moral attitude or religious principle." (Getty, 2017)

Comment: The description for this term is indebted to DBpedia.

Replaced by: genre:parable

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genre:genreParatexts

URI: http://sparql.cwrc.ca/ontologies/genre#genreParatexts

paratext

"Text surrounding the main body of a written work that contains supplementary information about the body, such as a preface, afterword, footnote, or glossary." (Oxford, 2015)

Comment: This term and its description were created from data gathered from the Oxford Dictionary of Literary Terms, 4th ed.

Replaced by: genre:paratext

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genre:genreParody

URI: http://sparql.cwrc.ca/ontologies/genre#genreParody

parody

"A parody (/ˈpærədi/; also called spoof, send-up, take-off or lampoon), in use, is a work created to imitate, make fun of, or comment on an original work, its subject, author, style, or some other target, by means of satiric or ironic imitation. As the literary theorist Linda Hutcheon puts it, "parody … is imitation, not always at the expense of the parodied text." Another critic, Simon Dentith, defines parody as "any cultural practice which provides a relatively polemical allusive imitation of another cultural production or practice."Parody may be found in art or culture, including literature, music (although "parody" in music has an earlier, somewhat different meaning than for other art forms), animation, gaming and film. The writer and critic John Gross observes in his Oxford Book of Parodies, that parody seems to flourish on territory somewhere between pastiche ("a composition in another artist's manner, without satirical intent") and burlesque (which "fools around with the material of high literature and adapts it to low ends"). Meanwhile, the Encyclopédie of Denis Diderot distinguishes between the parody and the burlesque, "A good parody is a fine amusement, capable of amusing and instructing the most sensible and polished minds; the burlesque is a miserable buffoonery which can only please the populace." Historically, when a formula grows tired, as in the case of the moralistic melodramas in the 1910s, it retains value only as a parody, as demonstrated by the Buster Keaton shorts that mocked that genre. In his 1960 anthology of parody from the 14th through 20th centuries, critic Dwight Macdonald offered this metaphor: "Parody is making a new wine that tastes like the old but has a slightly lethal effect." (DBpedia, 2017)

Comment: Deprecated in favour of instance parody.

Replaced by: genre:parody

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genre:genrePastoral

URI: http://sparql.cwrc.ca/ontologies/genre#genrePastoral

pastoral

"Genre that depicts or evokes idyllic life in the country; in works of pictorial art, often scenes of shepherds and shepherdesses in idealized arcadian landscapes." (Getty, 2017)

Comment: The description for this term is indebted to the Getty Art & Architecture Thesaurus.

Replaced by: genre:pastoral

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genre:genrePedagogy

URI: http://sparql.cwrc.ca/ontologies/genre#genrePedagogy

pedagogy

"Writing dealing with the theory and practice of teaching." (Oxford, 2015)

Comment: Deprecated in favour of instance pedagogy.

Replaced by: genre:pedagogy

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genre:genrePerformancepoetry

URI: http://sparql.cwrc.ca/ontologies/genre#genrePerformancepoetry

performance poetry

"Performance poetry is poetry that is specifically composed for or during a performance before an audience. During the 1980s, the term came into popular usage to describe poetry written or composed for performance rather than print distribution." (DBpedia, 2017)

Comment: The description for this term is indebted to DBpedia.

Replaced by: genre:performancePoetry

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genre:genrePeriodical

URI: http://sparql.cwrc.ca/ontologies/genre#genrePeriodical

periodical

"Publications issued at regular intervals, but not daily, containing articles on various subjects by different authors for the general reader." (Getty, 2017)

Comment: The description for this term is indebted to the Getty Art & Architecture Thesaurus.

Replaced by: genre:periodical

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genre:genrePetition

URI: http://sparql.cwrc.ca/ontologies/genre#genrePetition

petition

"Includes any written requests and lists of signatures submitted to an authority to appeal for the performance of specific action." (Getty, 2017)

Comment: Deprecated in favour of instance petition.

Replaced by: genre:petition

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genre:genrePhilosophical

URI: http://sparql.cwrc.ca/ontologies/genre#genrePhilosophical

philosophical

Writing engaging in philosophical questions, that may or may not be considered philosophy per se.

Comment: Deprecated in favour of instance philosophical.

Replaced by: genre:philosophical

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genre:genrePhilosophy

URI: http://sparql.cwrc.ca/ontologies/genre#genrePhilosophy

philosophy

"(Greek, "Love of wisdom"): The methodical and systematic exploration of what we know, how we know it, and why it is important that we know it. Too frequently, students use the term somewhat nebulously. They often mistakenly state, "My philosophy about X is . . ." when they really mean, "My opinion about X is . . ." or "My attitude toward X is . . ." Traditional areas of Western philosophic inquiry include the following areas." (L. K Wheeler, 2017)

Comment: This term and its description were created from data gathered from DBpedia.

Replaced by: genre:philosophy

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genre:genrePicaresque

URI: http://sparql.cwrc.ca/ontologies/genre#genrePicaresque

picaresque

"The picaresque novel (Spanish: "picaresca," from "pícaro," for "rogue" or "rascal") is a genre of prose fiction which depicts the adventures of a roguish hero of low social class who lives by his wits in a corrupt society. Picaresque novels typically adopt a realistic style, with elements of comedy and satire. This style of novel originated in 16th-century Spain and flourished throughout Europe in the 17th and 18th centuries. It continues to influence modern literature. According to the traditional view of Thrall and Hibbard (first published in 1936), seven qualities distinguish the picaresque novel or narrative form, all or some of which may be employed for effect by the author. (1) A picaresque narrative is usually written in first person as an autobiographical account. (2) The main character is often of low character or social class. He or she gets by with wit and rarely deigns to hold a job. (3) There is no plot. The story is told in a series of loosely connected adventures or episodes. (4) There is little if any character development in the main character. Once a picaro, always a picaro. His or her circumstances may change but they rarely result in a change of heart. (5) The picaro's story is told with a plainness of language or realism. (6) Satire might sometimes be a prominent element. (7) The behavior of a picaresque hero or heroine stops just short of criminality. Carefree or immoral rascality positions the picaresque hero as a sympathetic outsider, untouched by the false rules of society. However, Trall and Hibbert's thesis has been questioned by scholars[specify] interested in how genre functions, rather than how it looks on the surface." (DBpedia, 2017)

Comment: Deprecated in favour of instance picaresque.

Replaced by: genre:picaresque

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genre:genrePindaric

URI: http://sparql.cwrc.ca/ontologies/genre#genrePindaric

pindaric

"Pindarics (alternatively Pindariques or Pindaricks) was a term for a class of loose and irregular odes greatly in fashion in England during the close of the 17th and the beginning of the 18th century. Abraham Cowley, who published fifteen Pindarique Odes in 1656, was the poet most identified with the form though many others had composed irregular verses before him. The term is derived from the name of a Greek archaic poet, Pindar, but is based on a misconception since Pindar's odes were in fact very formal, obeying a triadic structure, in which the form of the first stanza (strophe) was repeated in the second stanza (antistrophe), followed by a third stanza (epode) that introduced variations but whose form was repeated by other epodes in subsequent triads." (DBpedia, 2017)

Comment: This term and its description were created from data gathered from DBpedia.

Replaced by: genre:pindaric

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genre:genrePoetry

URI: http://sparql.cwrc.ca/ontologies/genre#genrePoetry

poetry

"Poetry is a form of literature that uses aesthetic and rhythmic qualities of language—such as phonaesthetics, sound symbolism, and metre—to evoke meanings in addition to, or in place of, the prosaic ostensible meaning." (DBpedia, 2017)

Comment: The description for this term is indebted to DBpedia.

Replaced by: genre:poetry

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genre:genrePolemic

URI: http://sparql.cwrc.ca/ontologies/genre#genrePolemic

polemic

"Aggressive, forcefully presented arguments, often disputing a policy or opinion." (Getty, 2017)

Comment: The description for this term is indebted to DBpedia.

Replaced by: genre:polemic

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genre:genrePoliticalwriting

URI: http://sparql.cwrc.ca/ontologies/genre#genrePoliticalwriting

political writing

Writing on the subject of politics, often persuasive in tone and written in favour of a particular political party or cause.

Comment: Deprecated in favour of instance political writing.

Replaced by: genre:politicalWriting

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genre:genrePopular

URI: http://sparql.cwrc.ca/ontologies/genre#genrePopular

popular

"Visual arts produced by or for the general public, often reflecting fads and as a response to the daily environment; works produced for mass audiences as distinct from fine art and folk art." (Getty, 2017)

Comment: Deprecated in favour of instance popular.

Replaced by: genre:popular

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genre:genrePrayer

URI: http://sparql.cwrc.ca/ontologies/genre#genrePrayer

prayer

"Reverent petitions, usually in verse or prose, to a deity or other spiritual entity." (Getty, 2017)

Comment: This term and its description were created from data gathered from the Getty Art & Architecture Thesaurus.

Replaced by: genre:prayer

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genre:genrePrefatorypiece

URI: http://sparql.cwrc.ca/ontologies/genre#genrePrefatorypiece

prefatory piece

"Texts preceding the main literary work and containing comments about such matters as the reason for or circumstances of the author's writing the work, or comments by another about the author or the work." (Getty, 2017)

Comment: This term and its description were created from data gathered from the Getty Art & Architecture Thesaurus.

Replaced by: genre:prefatoryPiece

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genre:genreProletarianwriting

URI: http://sparql.cwrc.ca/ontologies/genre#genreProletarianwriting

proletarian writing

Writing by members of the working-classes or poor, including that by those who consider themselves members of the proletariat, and sometimes also writing produced to raise awareness of poor economic or labour conditions.

Comment: Deprecated in favour of instance proletarian writing.

Replaced by: genre:proletarianWriting

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genre:genrePrologue

URI: http://sparql.cwrc.ca/ontologies/genre#genrePrologue

prologue

"(1) In original Greek tragedy, the prologue was either the action or a set of introductory speeches before the first entry (parados) of the chorus. Here, a single actor's monologue or a dialogue between two actors would establish the play's background events. (2) In later literature, a prologue is a section of any introductory material before the first chapter or the main material of a prose work, or any such material before the first stanza of a poetic work." (L. K Wheeler, 2017)

Comment: The description for this term is indebted to Dr. L. Kip Wheeler of Carson-Newman University.

Replaced by: genre:prologue

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genre:genrePropaganda

URI: http://sparql.cwrc.ca/ontologies/genre#genrePropaganda

propaganda

"(Latin, "things that must be sent forth"): In its original use, the term referred to a committee of cardinals the Roman Catholic church founded in 1622 (the Congregatio de propaganda fide). This group established specific educational materials to be sent with priests-in-training for foreign missions . The term is today used to refer to information, rumors, ideas, and artwork spread deliberately to help or harm another specific group, movement, belief, institution, or government. The term's connotations are mostly negative. When literature or journalism is propaganda and when it is not is hotly debated. For instance, the Roman Emperor Augustus commissioned Virgil to write The Aeneid for specific goals. He wanted Virgil to glorify Rome's greatness, instill public pride in Rome's past, and cultivate traditional Roman virtues such as loyalty to the family, the Empire, and the gods. Is this propaganda? Or patriotism? Typically, readers claim a work is propaganda when it sets forth an argument with which they personally disagree. In other cases, readers will call a work propagandistic if they can perceive that the characters or the author advances particular doctrines or principles. Harry Shaw notes: "Propaganda is attacked by most critics and general readers because it is an attempt to influence opinions and actions deliberately, but by this definition all education and most literature are propagandistic" (220)." (L. K Wheeler, 2017)

Comment: Deprecated in favour of instance propaganda.

Replaced by: genre:propaganda

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genre:genreProphecy

URI: http://sparql.cwrc.ca/ontologies/genre#genreProphecy

prophecy

"Prophecy involves a process in which one or more messages allegedly communicated to a prophet are then communicated to other people. Such messages typically involve] inspiration, interpretation, or revelation of events to come (compare divine knowledge). Historically, clairvoyance has been used[by whom?] as an adjunct to prophecy." (DBpedia, 2017)

Comment: Deprecated in favour of instance prophecy.

Replaced by: genre:prophecy

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genre:genrePsalm

URI: http://sparql.cwrc.ca/ontologies/genre#genrePsalm

psalm

"Sacred songs that may be sung or recited in religious worship, particularly those contained in the Book of Psalms in the Old Testament and Hebrew Scriptures." (Getty, 2017)

Comment: This term and its description were created from data gathered from the Dictionnaire Vivant de la Langue Française.

Replaced by: genre:psalm

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genre:genrePsychoanalytical

URI: http://sparql.cwrc.ca/ontologies/genre#genrePsychoanalytical

psychoanalytical

Writing related to the field of psychology or psychiatry, particularly in connection with Sigmund Freud’s theories of psychoanalysis.

Comment: Deprecated in favour of instance psychoanalytical.

Replaced by: genre:psychoanalytical

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genre:genreQuiz

URI: http://sparql.cwrc.ca/ontologies/genre#genreQuiz

quiz

A brief, interactive text that poses questions for the reader to answer, often as an assessment of knowledge in the form of questionnaire.

Comment: Deprecated in favour of instance quiz.

Replaced by: genre:quiz

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genre:genreRadiodrama

URI: http://sparql.cwrc.ca/ontologies/genre#genreRadiodrama

radio drama

"Radio drama (or audio drama, audio play, radio play, radio theater, or audio theater) is a dramatized, purely acoustic performance, broadcast on radio. With no visual component, radio drama depends on dialogue, music and sound effects to help the listener imagine the characters and story." (DBpedia, 2017)

Comment: Deprecated in favour of instance radio drama.

Replaced by: genre:radioDrama

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genre:genreRealist

URI: http://sparql.cwrc.ca/ontologies/genre#genreRealist

realist

"Fiction that attempts to capture life as it is, rejecting idealism in favour of exposing in detail the realities, including the flaws, of its characters and their lives." (Oxford, 2015)

Comment: Deprecated in favour of instance realist.

Replaced by: genre:realist

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genre:genreRegional

URI: http://sparql.cwrc.ca/ontologies/genre#genreRegional

regional

Comment: Encyclopédie du Canada

Replaced by: genre:regional

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genre:genreReligious

URI: http://sparql.cwrc.ca/ontologies/genre#genreReligious

religious

Writing dealing with religion or spirituality.

Comment: Deprecated in favour of instance religious.

Replaced by: genre:religious

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genre:genreReview

URI: http://sparql.cwrc.ca/ontologies/genre#genreReview

review

"Periodicals, reports, or essays giving critical estimates and appraisals of art, a performance, or event." (Getty, 2017)

Comment: Deprecated in favour of instance review.

Replaced by: genre:review

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genre:genreRevue

URI: http://sparql.cwrc.ca/ontologies/genre#genreRevue

revue

"Periodicals, reports, or essays giving critical estimates and appraisals of art, a performance, or event. For other critical descriptions and analyses, prefer "criticism." (Getty, 2017)

Comment: The description for this term is indebted to the Getty Art & Architecture Thesaurus.

Replaced by: genre:revue

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genre:genreRiddle

URI: http://sparql.cwrc.ca/ontologies/genre#genreRiddle

riddle

"(from Old English roedel, from roedan meaning "to give council" or "to read"): A universal form of literature in which a puzzling question or a conundrum is presented to the reader. The reader is often challenged to solve this enigma, which requires ingenuity in discovering the hidden meaning. A riddle may involve puns, symbolism, synecdoche, personification (especially prosopopoeia), or unusual imagery. For instance, a Norse riddle asks, "Tell me what I am. Thirty white horses round a red hill. First they champ. Then they stamp. Now they stand still." The answer is the speaker's teeth; these thirty white horses circle the "red hill" of the tongue; they champ and stamp while the riddler speaks, but stand still at the end of his riddle. Another famous example is the riddle of the sphinx from Sophocles' Oedipus Trilogy. The sphinx asks Oedipus, "What goes on four feet, on two feet, and then three. But the more feet it goes on, the weaker is he?" The answer is a human being, which crawls as an infant, walks erect on two feet as an adult, and totters on a staff (the third leg) in old age. The earliest known English riddles are recorded in the Exeter Book, and they probably date back to the 8th century. Examples, however, can be found in Greek, Sanskrit, Hebrew, Arabic, Persian, and Chinese, and many other languages. Authors of Anglo-Latin riddles include Aldhelm of Sherborne, Archbishop Tatwine of Canterbury, and Abbot Eusebius of Wearmouth. A large Renaissance collection can also be found in Nicolas Reusner's Aenigmatographia (1602)." (L. K Wheeler, 2017)

Comment: The description for this term is indebted to Dr. L. Kip Wheeler of Carson-Newman University.

Replaced by: genre:riddle

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genre:genreRomance

URI: http://sparql.cwrc.ca/ontologies/genre#genreRomance

romance

"Poetic or prosaic literary forms derived from medieval narratives of love, legendary or heroic adventures, and chivalry. Extends to narratives about important religious figures, or fantastic or supernatural events." (Getty, 2017)

Comment: The description for this term is indebted to the Getty Art & Architecture Thesaurus.

Replaced by: genre:romance

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genre:genreSagewriting

URI: http://sparql.cwrc.ca/ontologies/genre#genreSagewriting

sage writing

"Sage writing was a genre of creative nonfiction popular in the Victorian era. The concept originates with John Holloway's 1953 book The Victorian Sage: Studies in Argument. Sage writing is a development from ancient wisdom literature in which the writer chastises and instructs the reader about contemporary social issues, often utilizing discourses of philosophy, history, politics, and economics in non-technical ways. Prominent examples of the genre include writings by Thomas Carlyle, Matthew Arnold, John Ruskin, and Henry David Thoreau. Some 20th-century writers, such as Joan Didion and New Journalists such as Norman Mailer and Tom Wolfe, have also been identified as sage writers." (DBpedia, 2017)

Comment: The description for this term is indebted to DBpedia.

Replaced by: genre:sageWriting

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genre:genreSatire

URI: http://sparql.cwrc.ca/ontologies/genre#genreSatire

satire

"Literary compositions in verse or prose, or ideas expressed as the subjects of art works, in which human folly and vice are held up to scorn, derision, or ridicule." (Getty, 2017)

Comment: Deprecated in favour of instance satire.

Replaced by: genre:satire

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genre:genreScholarship

URI: http://sparql.cwrc.ca/ontologies/genre#genreScholarship

scholarship

Writing by a scholar, either amateur or professional, typically focused on a specific field or topic in which the author is an expert.

Comment: Deprecated in favour of instance scholarly writing.

Replaced by: genre:scholarship

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genre:genreSchoolfiction

URI: http://sparql.cwrc.ca/ontologies/genre#genreSchoolfiction

school fiction

"The school story is a fiction genre centering on older pre-adolescent and adolescent school life, at its most popular in the first half of the twentieth century. While examples do exist in other countries, it is most commonly set in English boarding schools and mostly written in girls' and boys' subgenres, reflecting the single-sex education typical until the 1950s. It focuses largely on friendship, honor and loyalty between pupils. Plots involving sports events, bullies, secrets, rivalry and bravery are often used to shape the school story." (DBpedia, 2017)

Comment: Deprecated in favour of instance school fiction.

Replaced by: genre:schoolFiction

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genre:genreSciencefiction

URI: http://sparql.cwrc.ca/ontologies/genre#genreSciencefiction

science fiction

"Science fiction is a genre of speculative fiction dealing with imaginative concepts such as futuristic settings, futuristic science and technology, space travel, time travel, faster than light travel, parallel universes and extraterrestrial life. Science fiction often explores the potential consequences of scientific and other innovations, and has been called a "literature of ideas." It usually eschews the supernatural, and unlike the related genre of fantasy, historically science fiction stories were intended to have at least a faint grounding in science-based fact or theory at the time the story was created, but this connection has become tenuous or non-existent in much of science fiction." (DBpedia, 2017)

Comment: The description for this term is indebted to DBpedia.

Replaced by: genre:scienceFiction

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genre:genreScientificwriting

URI: http://sparql.cwrc.ca/ontologies/genre#genreScientificwriting

scientific writing

Writing relating to scientific research, often reporting the findings of a particular scientific study.

Comment: Deprecated in favour of instance scientific writing.

Replaced by: genre:scientificWriting

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genre:genreScrapbook

URI: http://sparql.cwrc.ca/ontologies/genre#genreScrapbook

scrapbook

"Blank books or albums designed so that a variety of items may be affixed to the pages, including photographs, clippings, and other memorabilia." (Getty, 2017)

Comment: This term and its description were created from data gathered from the Getty Art & Architecture Thesaurus.

Replaced by: genre:scrapbook

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genre:genreSensationnovel

URI: http://sparql.cwrc.ca/ontologies/genre#genreSensationnovel

sensation novel

"The sensation novel was a literary genre of fiction popular in Great Britain in the 1860s and 1870s, following on from earlier melodramatic novels and the Newgate novels, which focused on tales woven around criminal biographies. It also drew on the gothic and romantic genres of fiction. The sensation novel's appearance notably follows the Industrial Revolution, which made books available on a mass scale for people of all social standings and increased the sensation novel's popularity. Sensation novels used both modes of romance and realism to the extreme where in the past they had traditionally been contradictory modes of literature. The sensation novelists commonly wrote stories that were allegorical and abstract; the abstract nature of the stories gave the authors room to explore scenarios that wrestled with the social anxieties of the Victorian Era. The loss of identity is seen in many sensation fiction stories because this was a common social anxiety; in Britain, there was an increased use in record keeping and therefore people questioned the meaning and permanence of identity. The social anxiety regarding identity is reflected in stories, such as, The Woman in White and Lady Audley's Secret. The genre of sensation fiction was established by the publications of the following novels The Woman in White by Wilkie Collins in 1859; East Lynne by Ellen Wood in 1861; Lady Audley's Secret by Mary Elizabeth Braddon in 1862. Perhaps the earliest use of the term, sensation fiction, as a name for such novels appears in the 1861 edition of the Saunders, Otley, & co.'s Literary Budget. The neo-Victorian novel of New Zealand author Eleanor Catton, The Luminaries, which won the 2013 Man Booker Prize, has been described as being heavily based on sensation literature, with its plot devices of "suspect wills and forged documents, secret marriages, illegitimacy and opium" (DBpedia, 2017)

Comment: The description for this term is indebted to DBpedia.

Replaced by: genre:sensationNovel

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genre:genreSentimental

URI: http://sparql.cwrc.ca/ontologies/genre#genreSentimental

sentimental

"The sentimental novel or the novel of sensibility is an 18th-century literary genre which celebrates the emotional and intellectual concepts of sentiment, sentimentalism, and sensibility. Sentimentalism, which is to be distinguished from sensibility, was a fashion in both poetry and prose fiction beginning in the eighteenth century in reaction to the rationalism of the Augustan Age. Sentimental novels relied on emotional response, both from their readers and characters. They feature scenes of distress and tenderness, and the plot is arranged to advance both emotions and actions. The result is a valorization of "fine feeling," displaying the characters as a model for refined, sensitive emotional effect. The ability to display feelings was thought to show character and experience, and to shape social life and relations." (DBpedia, 2017)

Comment: The description for this term is indebted to DBpedia.

Replaced by: genre:sentimental

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genre:genreSequel

URI: http://sparql.cwrc.ca/ontologies/genre#genreSequel

sequel

"(from Latin sequi, to follow): A literary work complete in itself, but continuing the narrative of an earlier work. It is a new story that extends or develops characters and situations found in an earlier work. Two sequels following an original work (together) are called a trilogy. Three sequels following an original work together are called a tetralogy.Often sequels have a reputation for inferior artistry compared to the original publication since they are often hastily written from the desire to capitalize on earlier financial success. Examples include Mark Twain's Tom Sawyer Abroad, which is a sequel to The Adventures of Tom Sawyer, and Alexandra Ripley's Scarlett, which is a sequel to Mitchell's Gone With the Wind. In the late twentieth century, it became common retroactively to write "prequels," a later book with the same geographic setting or characters, but which takes place in an earlier time." (L. K Wheeler, 2017)

Comment: This term and its description were created from data gathered from DBpedia.

Replaced by: genre:sequel

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genre:genreSermon

URI: http://sparql.cwrc.ca/ontologies/genre#genreSermon

sermon

"A sermon is an oration, lecture, or talk by a member of a religious institution or clergy. Sermons address a Biblical, theological, religious, or moral topic, usually expounding on a type of belief, law or behavior within both past and present contexts. Elements of the sermon often include exposition, exhortation and practical application. In Christianity, a sermon (also known as a homily within some churches) is usually delivered in a place of worship from an elevated architectural feature, variously known as a pulpit, a lectern, or an ambo. The word "sermon" comes from a Middle English word which was derived from Old French, which in turn came from the Latin word sermō meaning "discourse". The word can mean "conversation", which could mean that early sermons were delivered in the form of question and answer, and that only later did it come to mean a monologue. However, the Bible contains many speeches without interlocution, which some take to be sermons: Moses in Deuteronomy 1-33 ; Jesus' sermon on the mount in Matthew 5-7 (though the gospel writers do not specifically call it a sermon; the popular descriptor for Christ's speech there came much later); Peter after Pentecost in Acts 2:14-40 (though this speech was delivered to nonbelievers and as such is not quite parallel to the popular definition of a sermon). In modern language, the word "sermon" is used in secular terms, pejoratively, to describe a lengthy or tedious speech delivered with great passion, by any person, to an uninterested audience. A sermonette is a short sermon (usually associated with television broadcasting, as stations would present a sermonette before signing off for the night)." (DBpedia, 2017)

Comment: The description for this term is indebted to DBpedia.

Replaced by: genre:sermon

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genre:genreSexualawakeningfiction

URI: http://sparql.cwrc.ca/ontologies/genre#genreSexualawakeningfiction

sexual awakening fiction

Fiction in which a character, typically an adolescent, experiences sexual desires for the first time or has a first sexual encounter.

Comment: Deprecated in favour of instance sexual awakening fiction.

Replaced by: genre:sexualAwakeningFiction

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genre:genreShortstory

URI: http://sparql.cwrc.ca/ontologies/genre#genreShortstory

short story

"Relatively brief invented prose narratives." (Getty, 2017)

Comment: The description for this term is indebted to the Getty Art & Architecture Thesaurus.

Replaced by: genre:shortStory

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genre:genreSilverforknovel

URI: http://sparql.cwrc.ca/ontologies/genre#genreSilverforknovel

silver-fork novel

"A mocking term for a popular literary genre depicting life in upper-class British society in the 1820s-1840s." (Oxford, 2015)

Comment: This term and its description were created from data gathered from the Oxford Dictionary of Literary Terms, 4th ed.

Replaced by: genre:silverForkNovel

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genre:genreSketch

URI: http://sparql.cwrc.ca/ontologies/genre#genreSketch

sketch

"Short literary compositions on single subjects, often presenting the personal view of the author." (Getty, 2017)

Comment: This term and its description were created from data gathered from DBpedia.

Replaced by: genre:sketch

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genre:genreSketchbook

URI: http://sparql.cwrc.ca/ontologies/genre#genreSketchbook

sketch book

"Books or pads of blank sheets used or intended for sketching, which are informal or rough drawings." (Getty, 2017)

Comment: This term and its description were created from data gathered from DBpedia.

Replaced by: genre:sketchBook

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genre:genreSlavenarrative

URI: http://sparql.cwrc.ca/ontologies/genre#genreSlavenarrative

slave narrative

"An autobiographical account of the life of an escaped or freed slave. Typically written and published in the Americas and used as a form of protest against the slave trade." (Oxford, 2015)

Comment: Deprecated in favour of instance slave narrative.

Replaced by: genre:slaveNarrative

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genre:genreSocialscience

URI: http://sparql.cwrc.ca/ontologies/genre#genreSocialscience

social science

Writing dealing with the study of human societies and relationships across several fields of scientific study, including anthropology, political science, and sociology.

Comment: Deprecated in favour of instance social science.

Replaced by: genre:socialScience

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genre:genreSong

URI: http://sparql.cwrc.ca/ontologies/genre#genreSong

song

"A lyric poem with a number of repeating stanzas (called refrains), written to be set to music in either vocal performance or with accompaniment of musical instruments." (L. K Wheeler, 2017)

Comment: Deprecated in favour of instance song.

Replaced by: genre:song

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genre:genreSonnet

URI: http://sparql.cwrc.ca/ontologies/genre#genreSonnet

sonnet

"Poems consisting of 14 decasyllabic lines, often in a rhyming scheme. The sonnet form is considered to be of Italian origin, appearing in the 13th century in Sicily, after which it spread to Tuscany, where Petrarch perfected the form with his Canzioniere, a series of 317 sonnets to his idealized love, Laura. The Petrarchian sonnet has historically been the most widely used of the form, although the Elizabethan form (3 quatrains, with a final rhyming couplet) is also common." (Getty, 2017)

Comment: Deprecated in favour of instance sonnet.

Replaced by: genre:sonnet

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genre:genreSpeech

URI: http://sparql.cwrc.ca/ontologies/genre#genreSpeech

speech

"Documents containing the text of any public address or talk" (Getty, 2017)

Comment: The description for this term is indebted to the Getty Art & Architecture Thesaurus.

Replaced by: genre:speech

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genre:genreTestimony

URI: http://sparql.cwrc.ca/ontologies/genre#genreTestimony

testimony

"Solemn declarations, written or verbal; usually made orally by a witness under oath in response to interrogation by a lawyer or authorized public official, then reduced to writing for the record." (Getty, 2017)

Comment: The description for this term is indebted to the Getty Art & Architecture Thesaurus.

Replaced by: genre:testimony

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genre:genreTextbook

URI: http://sparql.cwrc.ca/ontologies/genre#genreTextbook

textbook

"Books used as standard works for the formal study of a particular subject." (Getty, 2017)

Comment: The description for this term is indebted to the Getty Art & Architecture Thesaurus.

Replaced by: genre:textbook

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genre:genreTheatreofcruelty

URI: http://sparql.cwrc.ca/ontologies/genre#genreTheatreofcruelty

theatre of cruelty

"The Theatre of Cruelty (French: Théâtre de la Cruauté) is a form of theatre developed by avant-garde playwright, actor, essayist, and theorist, Antonin Artaud, in The Theatre and its Double. Originally a member of the surrealist movement, Artaud eventually began to develop his own theatrical theories. The Theatre of Cruelty can be seen as break with traditional Western theatre, and a means by which artists assault the senses of the audience, and allow them to feel the unexpressed emotions of the subconscious. While Artaud was only able to produce one play in his lifetime that reflected the tenets of the Theatre of Cruelty, the works of many theatre artists reflect his theories." (DBpedia, 2017)

Comment: Deprecated in favour of instance theatre of cruelty.

Replaced by: genre:theatreOfCruelty

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genre:genreTheatreoftheabsurd

URI: http://sparql.cwrc.ca/ontologies/genre#genreTheatreoftheabsurd

theatre of the absurd

"The Theatre of the Absurd (French: théâtre de l'absurde) is a post–World War II designation for particular plays of absurdist fiction written by a number of primarily European playwrights in the late 1950s, as well as one for the style of theatre which has evolved from their work. Their work focused largely on the idea of existentialism and expressed what happens when human existence has no meaning or purpose and therefore all communication breaks down, in fact alerting their audiences to pursue the opposite. Logical construction and argument gives way to irrational and illogical speech and to its ultimate conclusion, silence." (DBpedia, 2017)

Comment: Deprecated in favour of instance theatre of the absurd.

Replaced by: genre:theatreOfTheAbsurd

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genre:genreTheology

URI: http://sparql.cwrc.ca/ontologies/genre#genreTheology

theology

A branch of religious writing attempting to deal systematically with the study of a deity or deities or religious beliefs; the science of religion.

Comment: This term and its description were created from data gathered from DBpedia.

Replaced by: genre:theology

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genre:genreThesaurus

URI: http://sparql.cwrc.ca/ontologies/genre#genreThesaurus

thesaurus

"A semantic network of unique concepts, including relationships between synonyms, broader and narrower contexts, and other related concepts. Thesauri may be monolingual or multilingual. Thesauri may have the following three relationships between terms: equivalence (synonyms), hierarchical (whole/part), and associative (various types of other relationships)." (Getty, 2017)

Comment: This term and its description were created from data gathered from the Getty Art & Architecture Thesaurus.

Replaced by: genre:thesaurus

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genre:genreThriller

URI: http://sparql.cwrc.ca/ontologies/genre#genreThriller

thriller

"Fiction full of action and suspense in which the protagonist is threatened by some sort of danger, often through the actions of a villain or criminal. The protagonist must usually employ both physical skill and wit to escape danger and outsmart the villain." (Oxford, 2015)

Comment: Deprecated in favour of instance thriller.

Replaced by: genre:thriller

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genre:genreTopographicalpoetry

URI: http://sparql.cwrc.ca/ontologies/genre#genreTopographicalpoetry

topographical poetry

"Topographical poetry or loco-descriptive poetry is a genre of poetry that describes, and often praises, a landscape or place. John Denham's 1642 poem "Cooper's Hill" established the genre, which peaked in popularity in 18th-century England. Examples of topographical verse date, however, to the late classical period, and can be found throughout the medieval era and during the Renaissance. Though the earliest examples come mostly from continental Europe, the topographical poetry in the tradition originating with Denham concerns itself with the classics, and many of the various types of topographical verse, such as river, ruin, or hilltop poems were established by the early 17th century. Alexander Pope's "Windsor Forest" (1713) and John Dyer's "Grongar Hill' (1762) are two other oft-mentioned examples. More recently, Matthew Arnold's "The Scholar Gipsy" (1853) praises the Oxfordshire countryside, and W. H. Auden's "In Praise of Limestone" (1948) uses a limestone landscape as an allegory. Subgenres of topographical poetry include the country house poem, written in 17th-century England to compliment a wealthy patron, and the prospect poem, describing the view from a distance or a temporal view into the future, with the sense of opportunity or expectation. When understood broadly as landscape poetry and when assessed from its establishment to the present, topographical poetry can take on many formal situations and types of places. Kenneth Baker identifies 37 varieties and compiles poems from the 16th through the 20th centuries—from Edmund Spenser to Sylvia Plath—correspondent to each type, from "Walks and Surveys," to "Mountains, Hills, and the View from Above," to "Violation of Nature and the Landscape," to "Spirits and Ghosts." Common aesthetic registers of which topographical poetry make use include pastoral imagery, the sublime, and the picturesque. These latter two registers subsume imagery of rivers, ruins, moonlight, birdsong, and clouds, peasants, mountains, caves, and waterscapes." (DBpedia, 2017)

Comment: The description for this term is indebted to DBpedia.

Replaced by: genre:topographicalPoetry

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genre:genreTractpamphlet

URI: http://sparql.cwrc.ca/ontologies/genre#genreTractpamphlet

tract pamphlet

"Writing printed on a single sheet of paper or in a small booklet, designed to be distributed to the public. The subject matter is typically religious or political, and aims to persuade the reader of a certain point of view." (Getty, 2017)

Comment: This term and its description were created from data gathered from the Getty Art & Architecture Thesaurus.

Replaced by: genre:tractPamphlet

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genre:genreTragedy

URI: http://sparql.cwrc.ca/ontologies/genre#genreTragedy

tragedy

"Literary works of serious and dignified character that reach disastrous or sorrowful conclusions." (Getty, 2017)

Comment: The description for this term is indebted to DBpedia.

Replaced by: genre:tragedy

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genre:genreTragicomedy

URI: http://sparql.cwrc.ca/ontologies/genre#genreTragicomedy

tragicomedy

"Tragicomedy is a literary genre that blends aspects of both tragic and comic forms. Most often seen in dramatic literature, the term can variously describe either a tragic play which contains enough comic elements to lighten the overall mood or a serious play with a happy ending." (DBpedia, 2017)

Comment: The description for this term is indebted to DBpedia.

Replaced by: genre:tragicomedy

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genre:genreTranslation

URI: http://sparql.cwrc.ca/ontologies/genre#genreTranslation

translation

"The act of conveying the meaning of words in one language by attempting to say the same thing in another language, as opposed to paraphrasing, summarizing, and transliteration." (L. K Wheeler, 2017)

Comment: Deprecated in favour of instance translation.

Replaced by: genre:translation

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genre:genreTravelwriting

URI: http://sparql.cwrc.ca/ontologies/genre#genreTravelwriting

travel writing

Writing about time spent abroad, typically containing descriptions of the scenery and culture of places visited. Sometimes includes biographical content, such as travel literature written in the form of a personal journal or diary.

Comment: Deprecated in favour of instance travel writing.

Replaced by: genre:travelWriting

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genre:genreTreatise

URI: http://sparql.cwrc.ca/ontologies/genre#genreTreatise

treatise

"Formal and systematic written expositions of the principles of a subject, generally longer and more detailed than essays." (Getty, 2017)

Comment: The description for this term is indebted to DBpedia.

Replaced by: genre:treatise

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genre:genreUtopia

URI: http://sparql.cwrc.ca/ontologies/genre#genreUtopia

utopia

"An imaginary place or government in which political and social perfection has been reached in the material world as opposed to some spiritual afterlife as discussed in the Christian Bible or the Elysian fields of The Odyssey. The citizens of such utopias are typically universally clean, virtuous, healthy, and happy, or at least those who are criminals are always captured and appropriately punished. A utopian society is one that has cured all social ills. See discussion under Utopian literature, below. Contrast with dystopia. UTOPIAN" (L. K Wheeler, 2017)

Comment: This term and its description were created from data gathered from DBpedia.

Replaced by: genre:utopia

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genre:genreVersenovel

URI: http://sparql.cwrc.ca/ontologies/genre#genreVersenovel

verse novel

"A verse novel is a type of narrative poetry in which a novel-length narrative is told through the medium of poetry rather than prose. Either simple or complex stanzaic verse-forms may be used, but there will usually be a large cast, multiple voices, dialogue, narration, description, and action in a novelistic manner." (DBpedia, 2017)

Comment: The description for this term is indebted to DBpedia.

Replaced by: genre:verseNovel

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genre:genreVignette

URI: http://sparql.cwrc.ca/ontologies/genre#genreVignette

vignette

"In theatrical script writing, sketch stories, and poetry, a vignette is a short impressionistic scene that focuses on one moment or gives a trenchant impression about a character, idea, setting, or object.[citation needed] This type of scene is more common in recent postmodern theater, where less emphasis is placed on adhering to the conventions of theatrical structure and story development. Vignettes have been particularly influenced by contemporary notions of a scene as shown in film, video and television scripting. It is also a part of something bigger than itself: for example, a vignette about a house belonging to a collection of vignettes or a whole story, such as The House On Mango Street, by Sandra Cisneros. A blog can provide a form of vignette." (DBpedia, 2017)

Comment: This term and its description were created from data gathered from DBpedia.

Replaced by: genre:vignette

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genre:genreVillanelle

URI: http://sparql.cwrc.ca/ontologies/genre#genreVillanelle

villanelle

"A versatile genre of poetry consisting of nineteen lines--five tercets and a concluding quatrain. The form requires that whole lines be repeated in a specific order, and that only two rhyming sounds occur in the course of the poem. A number of English poets, including Oscar Wilde, W. E. Henley, and W. H. Auden have experimented with it. Here is an example of an opening stanza to one poem by W. E. Henley: Probably the most famous English villanelle is Dylan Thomas's "Do Not Go Gentle Into That Good Night." (L. K Wheeler, 2017)

Comment: Deprecated in favour of instance villanelle.

Replaced by: genre:villanelle

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genre:genreYoungadultwriting

URI: http://sparql.cwrc.ca/ontologies/genre#genreYoungadultwriting

young adult writing

Writing aimed at a young adult audience.

Comment: Deprecated in favour of instance young adult writing.

Replaced by: genre:youngAdultWriting

4. Version History

  • 0.1 - Ontology separated off from main cwrc ontology.

  • 0.2 - Definitions and translations added.

  • 0.3 - Deprecating of all genre instances and new uris, and instances being typed as Literary Genre.

5. Bibliography

Baldick, C. The Oxford Dictionary Of Literary Terms. no date. 4th ed., Oxford University Press, 2015.[link]
Briet, S. Qu'est-Ce Que La Documentation?. no date. Éditions Documentaires Industrielles et Techniques, 1951.[link]
Cuddon, J. A. The Penguin Dictionary Of Literary Terms And Literary Theory. no date. Edited by C. E. Preston, 4th ed., Penguin Books, 1999.[link]
Dbpedia. Dbpedia. no date. DBpedia, 2017.[link]
Dbpedia. Dbpedia. no date. no date.[link]
Encyclopædia Britannica. Encyclopædia Britannica. no date. Encyclopædia Britannica, Inc., 2017.[link]
Foster, J. W. The Cambridge Companion To The Irish Novel. no date. Cambridge University Press, 2006.[link]
Getty Art And Architecture Thesaurus. Getty Art And Architecture Thesaurus. no date. The J. Paul Getty Trust, 2017.[link]
Gruninger, M., and M. Fox. Methodology For The Design And Evaluation Of Ontologies. no date. University of Toronto, 1995Apr .[link]
Harper, C., and B. Tillett. “Library Of Congress Controlled Vocabularies And Their Application To The Semantic Web”. no date. Cataloging & Classification Quarterly, 2007.[link]
Ifla Study Group On The Functional Requirements For Bibliographic Records. Ifla Study Group On The Functional Requirements For Bibliographic Records. no date. K.G. Saur Verlag, 1998.[link]
L. K. Wheeler Literary Terms. L. K. Wheeler Literary Terms. no date. 2017.[link]
Lester, M. Coincidence Of User Vocabulary And Library Of Congress Subject Headings: Experiments To Improve Subject Access In Academic Libra. no date. no date.[link]
Lu, C., et al. “User Tags Versus Expert-Assigned Subject Terms: A Comparison Of Librarything Tags And Library Of Congress Subject Headings.”. no date. Journal Of Information Science, 2010Nov. .[link]
MazellaMazella, D. D. The Making Of Modern Cynicism. no date. University of Virginia Press, 2007.[link]
Merriam-Webster. Merriam-Webster. no date. Merriam-Webster, Incorporated, 2017.[link]
Michelson, D. “Irreconcilable Differences? Name Authority Control And Humanities Scholarship”. no date. Hanging Together, 2013Mar. .[link]
Miller, C. “Genre As Social Action”. no date. Quarterly Journal Of Speech, 2009June .[link]
Ranganathan, S. R. Prolegomena To Library Classification. no date. Asia Publishing House (New York), 1967.[link]
Richard, K., and P. Gandel. “The Tower, The Cloud, And Posterity.”. no date. The Tower And The Cloud, 2008.[link]
Stevenson, A. The Oxford Dictionary Of English. no date. 3rd ed., Oxford University Press, 2015.[link]
“Advertising Copy”. “Advertising Copy”. no date. Business Dictionary, WebFinance Inc., 2017.[link]